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Research Lab Results for quality of life

Displaying 1 to 15 of 15 results
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  • Alicia Arbaje Lab

    Research in the Alicia Arbaje Lab aims to help older adults maintain dignity and quality of life as they age. We are particularly interested in creating health care systems to improve safety and outcomes for older adults.

    Research Areas: safety, gerontology, health care systems
  • ALS Center

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Nicholas Maragakis, M.D.
    Neurology

    The ALS Center for Cell Therapy and Regeneration Research at Johns Hopkins is committed to identifying the causes of the neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and discovering new and effective treatment options. At the ALS Center, Johns Hopkins researchers work with other investigators, including those at the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins and clinicians within the Johns Hopkins ALS Clinic to aggressively take groundbreaking scientific discoveries and turn them into clinical applications that will improve the quality of life of those diagnosed with ALS.

    Research Areas: ALS
  • Ari Cedars Laboratory

    Principal Investigator:
    Ari Cedars, M.D.
    Medicine

    Ari Cedars, M.D., and his team have three primary research goals. First, the Cedars Lab is interested in patient-centered outcomes in congenital heart disease, which they investigate using a digital tracking system to record participants’ symptoms and quality of life. Second, the Cedars Lab investigates outcomes with mechanical circulatory support and transplant in congenital heart disease, with a focus on those with end-stage heart disease and a Fontan circulation. Third, the Cedars Lab is interested in the biological mechanisms underlying circulatory deterioration and end-organ dysfunction in patients with a Fontan circulation.

    Research Areas: heart disease, congenital heart disease
  • Claire Snyder Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Claire Snyder, M.H.S., Ph.D.
    Medicine

    Researchers in the Claire Snyder Lab study the quality of cancer care, with a special focus on two areas: the quality of life for cancer patients undergoing treatment and the coordination of care between cancer specialists and primary care providers. As part of our quality-of-life research, we're investigating the use of patient-reported outcome questionnaires in routine oncology practice as well as developing a website for collecting the questionnaires and linking them with the electronic medical record. As part of our cancer-survivorship research, we've conducted large database studies to identify the physician specialties involved in the care of cancer survivors and to determine how that relates to survivors receiving recommended follow-up care. We're also working with investigators in the Sydney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center to develop care strategies for breast cancer survivors.

    Research Areas: breast cancer, cancer survivors, cancer, quality of life, care coordination
  • Cynthia Boyd Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Cynthia Boyd, M.D., M.P.H.
    Medicine

    Research in the Cynthia Boyd Lab concentrates on the clinical care of comorbid chronically ill and frail older adults, both chronically and during acute illnesses. Current projects focus on the treatment burden among older adults with multimorbidity, the importance of competing risks in decision-making for the elderly, the effects of guided care on the quality of care and the improvement of clinical practice guidelines for the elderly.

    Research Areas: quality of life, comorbidity, frailty, gerontology
  • Improving Outcomes Following Injury and Illness

    Lab Website

    Led by Stephen Wegener, Ph.D, this research group focuses on projects that have the potential to improve function and quality of life and reduce disability following injury or illness. These projects include research on cognitive, behavioral, psychological and health care system factors that affect outcomes following injury.

    Research Areas: neuropsychology, amputation, patient-provider collaboration, disability, rehabilitation psychology, pain
  • Lilly Engineer Lab

    Research in the Lilly Engineer Lab examines the quality and safety of medical care, with a focus on rural and underserved communities. Our current research evaluates methods for improving immunization rates among inner-city populations of school-aged children. We are also exploring the effect of federal policy changes and health care market forces on rural hospitals in the United States.

    Research Areas: safety, quality of life, rural health care, health disparities
  • Maureen Horton Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Maureen Horton, M.D.
    Medicine

    The Maureen Horton Lab conducts research on pulmonary fibrosis through the use of both preclinical models and human trials. Our studies have helped to develop novel, genetic, tissue-specific models of immune dysfunction, which have aided in defining the immune regulation of fibrosis and in the development of treatment strategies. We have used T-cell skewing immunotherapy to prevent and reverse chemical-induced lung fibrosis and have conducted clinical trials for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which led to one of the first treatments that helped to improve quality of life in IPF patients.

    Research Areas: interstitial lung diseases, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary fibrosis, autoimmune diseases, occupational lung diseases, T cells
  • Neuro-Oncology Surgical Outcomes Laboratory

    Lab Website

    Directed by Debraj “Raj” Mukherjee, MD, MPH, the laboratory focuses on improving access to care, reducing disparities, maximizing surgical outcomes, and optimizing quality of life for patients with brain and skull base tumors.



    The laboratory achieves these aims by creating and analyzing institutional and national databases, developing and validating novel patient-centered quality of life instruments, leveraging machine learning and artificial intelligence platforms to risk-stratify vulnerable patient populations, and designing novel surgical trials to push the boundaries of neurosurgical innovation.



    Our research also investigates novel approaches to improve neurosurgical medical education including studying the utility of video-based surgical coaching and the design of new operative instrumentation.

    Research Areas: medical education, surgical outcomes, neurosurgery, machine learning, access to care, surgical coaching, population health, quality of life, public health, artificial intelligence, oncology, disparities
  • Nicholas Rowan Lab

    Dr. Rowan is actively involved in both outcomes and translational research relating to chronic rhinosinusitis and endoscopic skull base surgery. He has a keen interest patient-reported quality of life outcomes as well as those that pertain to smell and taste. Dr. Rowan is also involved in sinus-related clinical trials, pursuing new medical therapies and technological advancements for the treatment of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Research Areas: clinical trials, smell and taste outcomes, Quality of life outcomes
  • Spinal Oncology Lab

    Lab Website

    The bony skeleton is one of the most common sites of metastatic spread of cancer and a significant source of morbidity in cancer patients, causing pain and pathological fracture, impaired ambulatory ability and poorer quality of life.

    In our continuous investigation of the mechanism of metastasis in spine tumors and of developing animal models and treatments, our team seeks to understand how cancer cells metastasize to the bony spine.

    Our laboratory develops novel techniques to evaluate our animal models of metastatic spine disease.

    Research Areas: spine cancer, spine, cancer
  • The Hackam Lab for Pediatric Surgical, Translational and Regenerative Medicine

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D.
    Pediatrics
    Surgery

    David Hackam’s laboratory focuses on necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating disease of premature infants and the leading cause of death and disability from gastrointestinal disease in newborns.

    The disease strikes acutely and without warning, causing sudden death of the small and large intestines. In severe cases, tiny patients with the disease are either dying or dead from overwhelming sepsis within 24 hours. Surgical treatment to remove most of the affected gut results in lifelong short gut (short bowel) syndrome.

    The Hackam Lab has identified a critical role for the innate immune receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis. The lab has shown that TLR4 regulates the development of the disease by tipping the balance between injury and repair in the stressed intestine of the premature infant. Developing an Artificial Intestine A key goal is to create, in the laboratory, new intestines made from patients’ own cells, which can then ...be implanted into the patient to restore normal digestive function. This innovative design could transform child development and quality of life in necrotizing enterocolitis survivors without the risks of conventional donor transplant. view more

    Research Areas: necrotizing enterocolitis, gut inflammation, stem cell biology, premature infants, TLR4
  • The Nauen Lab

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    David Nauen, M.D., Ph.D.
    Pathology

    Epilepsy affects 1-3% of the population and can have a profound impact on general health, employment and quality of life. Medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) develops in some patients following head injury or repeated febrile seizures. Those affected may first suffer spontaneous seizures many years after the initial insult, indicating that the neural circuit undergoes a slow pathologic remodeling over the interim. There are currently no methods of preventing the development of MTLE. It is our goal to better understand the process in order to slow, halt, and ultimately reverse it.

    Our laboratory draws on electrophysiology, molecular biology, and morphology to study the contribution of dysregulated neurogenesis and newborn neuron connectivity to the development of MTLE. We build on basic research in stem cell biology, hippocampal development, and synaptic plasticity. We work closely with colleagues in the Institute for Cell Engineering, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Biomedical Engineering..., and Radiology. As physician neuropathologists our grounding is in tissue alterations underlying human neurologic disease; using human iPSC-derived neurons and surgical specimens we focus on the pathophysiological processes as they occur in patients.

    By understanding changes in cell populations and morphologies that affect the circuit, and identifying pathologic alterations in gene expression that lead to the cell-level abnormalities, we hope to find treatment targets that can prevent the remodeling and break the feedback loop of abnormal activity > circuit change > abnormal activity.
    view more

    Research Areas: Medial temporal lobe epilepsy
  • Tsapkini Language Neuromodulation Lab

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Kyrana Tsapkini, Ph.D.
    Neurology

    We are exploring whether anodal tDCS when administered in combination with spelling, naming, or working memory therapy can improve language performance of PPA and MCI participants at least in the short term more than behavioral therapy alone. We are also investigating whether and how tDCS alters the neuropeptide signature in participants with PPA and MCI. We use proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to monitor neuropeptide concentrations at the areas of stimulation. We hypothesize that tDCS will stabilize the decline of specific neuropeptides, but only in those areas of the brain where tDCS effectively results in more efficient gains in language compared to language therapy alone (with sham tDCS). Study results may help optimize future intervention in individuals with PPA and MCI by providing treatment alternatives in a neurodegenerative condition with no proven effective treatment. A better understanding of the therapeutic and neuromodulatory effects of tDCS in PPA and MCI w...ill offer insight into ways of impeding neurodegeneration that may improve quality of life for individuals with PPA and MCI and may provide insights into the mechanisms of this treatment for augmenting therapy for stroke as well. view more

    Research Areas: cognitive neuroscience, dementia
  • Vestibular Neurophysiology Laboratory

    Lab Website

    The mission of the laboratory of vestibular neurophysiology is to advance the understanding of how the body perceives head motion and maintains balance - a complex and vital function of everyday life. Although much is known about the vestibular part of the inner ear, key aspects of how the vestibular receptors perceive, process and report essential information are still mysterious. Increasing our understanding of this process will have tremendous impact on quality of life of patients with vestibular disorders, who often suffer terrible discomfort from dizziness and vertigo.

    The laboratory group's basic science research focuses on the vestibulo-ocular reflexes - the reflexes that move the eyes in response to motions of the head. They do this by studying the vestibular sensors and nerve cells that provide input to the reflexes; by studying eye movements in humans and animals with different vestibular disorders, by studying effects of electrical stimulation of vestibular sensors, and b...y using mathematical models to describe these reflexes. Researchers are particularly interested in abnormalities of the brain's inability to compensate for vestibular disorders.

    view more

    Research Areas: vestibular disorders, vertigo, balance, dizziness
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