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Displaying 21 to 33 of 33 results for physiology

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  • Peter van Zijl Laboratory

    The Peter van Zijl Laboratory focuses on developing new methodologies for using MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to study brain function and physiology. In addition, we are working to understand the basic mechanisms of the MRI signal changes measured during functional MRI (fMRI) tests of the brain. We are also mapping the wiring of the brain (axonal connections between the brains functional regions) and designing new technologies for MRI to follow where cells are migrating and when genes are expressed. A more recent interest is the development of bioorganic biodegradable MRI contrast agents. Our ultimate goal is to transform these technologies into fast methods that are compatible with the time available for multi-modal clinical diagnosis using MRI.

    Research Areas: brain, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, MRI

  • Platelet Physiology Research Lab

    Dr. Williams' research focuses on platelet physiology particularly as it relates to acute coronary syndromes and depression. Her laboratory specifically examines platelet aggregation, flow cytometric analysis to measure platelet activation, platelet luminescence as a measure of the platelet release reaction, many Elisa preparations in order to measure platelet function, platelet genotyping to determine the presence of certain platelet polymorphisms, and various other assays to distinguish mechanisms of platelet dysfunction. The goal for her cardiovascular platelet laboratory is to identify the etiology of platelet dysfunction in many disease states and apply methods that may improve this dysfunction that can eventually be translated to therapies for patients with cardiovascular disease. Scientific techniques performed in the lab include: flow cytometric analysis, platelet microparticle identification, and protein immunoprecipitation among other techniques.

    Research Areas: platelets, Platelet drug response, Platelet Flow cytometric analysis, Platelet Aggregation

    Principal Investigator

    Marlene Williams, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Pluznick Lab

    The Pluznick Lab is interested in the role that chemosensation plays in regulating physiological processes, particularly in the kidney and the cardiovascular system. We have found that sensory receptors (olfactory receptors, taste receptors, and other G-protein coupled receptors) are expressed in the kidney and in blood vessels, and that individual receptors play functional roles in whole-animal physiology. We are currently working to identify the full complement of sensory receptors found in the kidney, and are working to understand the role that each receptor plays in whole-animal physiology by using a variety of in vitro (receptor localization, ligand screening) and in vivo (whole-animal physiology) techniques.

    Research Areas: sensory receptors, cardiovascular, physiology, chemosensation, renal

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jennifer Pluznick, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Rao Laboratory

    The Rao Laboratory studies the roles of intracellular cation transport in human health and disease using yeast as a model organism. Focus areas include intracellular Na+(K+)/H+ exchange and Golgi CA2+(MN+) ATPases.

    Research Areas: cellular biology, physiology, yeast

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Rajini Rao, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Raymond Koehler Lab

    Research in the Raymond Koehler Lab explores cerebrovascular physiology and cerebral ischemic injury caused by stroke and cardiac arrest, using protein analysis, immunohistochemistry and histology. We also study ischemic preconditioning, neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and the mechanisms of abnormal cerebrovascular reactivity after ischemia. We 're examining ways to improve tissue oxygenation and seek to better understand the mechanisms that connect an increase in cerebral blood flow to neuronal activity.

    Research Areas: cardiac arrest, neurons, cerebrovascular, resuscitation, stroke, oxygen

  • Richard Rivers Lab

    The Richard Rivers Lab researches vascular communication with a focus on microcirculation physiology. Our team seeks to determine how metabolic demands are passed between tissue and the vascular network as well as along the vascular network itself. Our goal is to better understand processes of diseases such as cancer and diabetes, which could lead to the development of more targeted drugs and treatment. We are also working to determine the role for inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir) 2.1 and 6.1 in signaling along the vessel wall as well as the role of gap junctions.

    Research Areas: cancer, potassium, diabetes, vascular biology, vascular, microcirculation

  • Robert Fitzgerald Laboratory

    The Robert Fitzgerald Laboratory studies cardiopulmonary physiology, especially cardiopulmonary control. We have focused in particular on the operation of the carotid body and the role of acetylcholine in its functioning. We have also examined the reflex effects of carotid body stimulation in various organs as well as the reflex response of ACTH and adrenal cortical hormones to hypoxic peripheral arterial chemoreceptor stimulation. We are currently interested in the spleen, as it is the only organ other than the lung that demonstrates increased vascular resistance in response to local hypoxia.

    Research Areas: acetylcholine, carotid body, cardiopulmonary diseases, lung disease, hypoxia

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Fitzgerald, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Robert H. Brown Lab

    Work in the Robert H. Brown Lab explores several topics within pulmonary physiology, with a long-term goal of understanding the structural changes in the lungs that lead to the pathophysiology of lung disease. Our core studies examine the structure-function relationship of pulmonary airways and vessels as well as their role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reactive airway disease. Recent research has involved studying the mechanisms and treatment of COPD progression, new methods for treating asthma, and lung inflation and airway hyperresponsiveness. We are also exploring the impact of HIV infection on the etiology of lung disease and the pathophysiologic consequences of lung distention.

    Research Areas: asthma, HIV, pulmonary physiology, lung disease, COPD, reactive airway disease

  • Ronald Schnaar Lab

    The Ronald Schnaar Lab is involved in the rapidly expanding field of glycobiology, which studies cell surface glycans, lectins, and their roles in cell physiology.

    Current projects in our lab study include (1) Glycans and glycan-binding proteins in inflammatory lung diseases, (2) Ganglioside function in the brain, and (3) HIV-Tat and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Research Areas: cell physiology, HIV, neurocognitive disorders, glycobiology

  • Sensorimotor Adaptation - Vestibular and Oculomotor

    Research in the Sensorimotor Adaptation--Vestibular and Oculomotor group focuses on sensorimotor adaptation to space flight and fractal statistics in physiology. Our projects aim to understand sensory processing for motor control with an emphasis on adaptive capabilities and mathematical modeling.

    Research Areas: sensorimotor adaptation, physiology, space flight, fractal statistics

  • Sleep Apnea Pathogenesis

    Our research laboratory is staffed by a dedicated and experienced team of sleep scientists, fellows, technicians, engineers, and students. Currently, we are focused on the following areas:

    -Novel treatments for sleep apnea using electrical and nerve stimulation and chemogenetic techniques

    -Cardiovascular and metabolic effects of sleep apnea and hypoxia

    -Leptin and its impact on breathing and cardiovascular physiology

    -Sleep disordered breathing at high altitude

    -Dietary impacts on asthma

    Research Areas: hypoxia, sleep apnea

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Vsevolod Polotsky, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory

    The research in the Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory is focused on the molecular mechanisms that regulate copper concentration in normal and diseased human cells. Copper is essential for human cell homeostasis. It is required for embryonic development and neuronal function, and the disruption of copper transport in human cells results in severe multisystem disorders, such as Menkes disease and Wilson's disease. To understand the molecular mechanisms of copper homeostasis in normal and diseased human cells, we utilize a multidisciplinary approach involving biochemical and biophysical studies of molecules involved in copper transport, cell biological studies of copper signaling, and analysis of copper-induced pathologies using Wilson's disease gene knock-out mice.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, menkes disease, Wilson's disease, cell biology, multisystem disorders, physiology, copper, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Svetlana Lutsenko, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Swallowing Investigation in Physiology (SIP) Lab

    The SIP Lab studies the mechanisms of normal and disordered swallowing. The team conducts research in the areas of swallowing rehabilitation after stroke, effects of aging on swallowing and measurement of swallowing physiology.

    Research Areas: deglutition, swallowing disorders, dysphagia, neurophysiology, stroke, aging, 320-row area detector, MRI, swallowing, physiology, videofluoroscopy, rehabilitation

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