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Displaying 1 to 10 of 16 results for pharmacology

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  • Bradley Undem Lab

    Research in the Bradley Undem Lab centers around the hypothesis that the peripheral nervous system is directly involved in the processes of inflammation. This hypothesis is being studied primarily in the central airways and sympathetic ganglia. We are addressing this in a multidisciplinary fashion, using pharmacological, electrophysiological, biochemical and anatomical methodologies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, electrophysiology, inflammation, pharmacology, nervous system

    Principal Investigator

    Bradley Undem, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory

    The long-term goal of the Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory is to develop novel approaches to kill human pathogens, including bacterial pathogens and malaria parasites, with the ultimate objective of developing potential therapeutic agents.

    Toward this goal, we are pursuing studies of bacterial isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes comprising the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway essential in many human pathogens. Studies focus on understanding mechanism and regulation in the pathway toward the development of selective inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Our strategies for creating new anti-infective agents involve interdisciplinary research in the continuum of organic, biological and medicinal chemistry. Molecular biology, protein expression and biochemistry, and synthetic chemistry are key tools for our research.

    Research Areas: bacterial pathogens, biochemistry, enzymes, infectious disease, protein expression, synthetic chemistry, isoprenoid biosynthesis, malaria, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

  • Charles W. Flexner Laboratory

    A. Laboratory activities include the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) techniques to measure intracellular drugs and drugs metabolites. AMS is a highly sensitive method for detecting tracer amounts of radio-labeled molecules in cells, tissues, and body fluids. We have been able to measure intracellular zidovudine triphosphate (the active anabolite of zidovudine) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers given small doses of 14C-zidovudine, and have directly compared the sensitivity of AMS to traditional LC/MS methods carried out in our laboratory.

    B. Clinical research activities investigate the clinical pharmacology of new anti-HIV therapies and drug combinations. Specific drug classes studied include HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, entry inhibitors (selective CCR5 and CXCR4 antagonists), and integrase inhibitors. Scientific objectives of clinical studies include characterization of early drug activity, toxicity, and pharmacok...inetics. Additional objectives are characterization of pathways of drug metabolism, and identification of clinically significant harmful and beneficial drug interactions mediated by hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P450 isoforms. view more

    Research Areas: antiretroviral drugs, infectious disease, HIV protease inhibitors, HIV, drugs, accelerator mass spectrometry

    Principal Investigator

    Charles Flexner, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Craig W. Hendrix Lab

    Research in the Craig W. Hendrix Lab concentrates on the chemoprevention of HIV infection, clinical pharmacology of antiviral drugs, drug interactions, and oral, topical and injectable HIV microbicide development. Our lab conducts small, intensive sampling studies of PK and PD of drugs for HIV prevention with a focus on developing methods to better understand HIV and drug distribution in the male genital tract, female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal tract. We also support numerous HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis development studies from phase I to phase III, largely as leader of the Pharmacology Core Laboratory of both the Microbicide Trial Network and HIV Prevention Trials Network.

    Research Areas: antiretroviral therapies, infectious disease, HIV, drugs

    Principal Investigator

    Craig W. Hendrix, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Dermot Maher Lab

    Research in the Dermot Maher Lab focuses on cancer pain management. We aim to characterize the immunosuppression that occurs with the use of certain pharmacologic pain therapies, including opioids. We also study the relationship between this pharmacologically induced immunosuppression and the rate of manifestation and recurrence of certain types of malignancies. Our goal is to gain a broader understanding of the benefits and side effects of pain medication pharmacology in order to help patients suffering from painful and complex conditions, such as cancer, manage their symptoms more effectively.

    Research Areas: opioids, pain management, cancer, immunosuppression, pharmacology

  • Jun O. Liu Laboratory

    The Jun O. Liu Laboratory tests small molecules to see if they react in our bodies to find potential drugs to treat disease. We employ high-throughput screening to identify modulators of various cellular processes and pathways that have been implicated in human diseases from cancer to autoimmune diseases. Once biologically active inhibitors are identified, they will serve both as probes of the biological processes of interest and as leads for the development of new drugs for treating human diseases. Among the biological processes of interest are cancer cell growth and apoptosis, angiogenesis, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, eukaryotic transcription and translation.

    Research Areas: cancer, autoimmune, eukaryotic cells, drugs, cellular signaling, pharmacology, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, molecular biology, angiogenesis

  • Kelly E. Dooley Laboratory

    Research focuses on clinical pharmacology of new anti-tuberculosis regimens with an emphasis on: (1) Phase I clinical trials of new or existing anti-TB drugs including dose escalation trials and studies of drug-drug interactions between anti-TB agents and antiretrovirals to treat HIV; (2) Use of PK/PD analysis and modelling in Phase II tuberculosis clinical treatment trials to determine concentration-effect relationships that will allow for optimization of dosing; and (3) Evaluation of TB and HIV drug concentrations in special populations, such as pregnant women and children; (4) Evaluation of treatment-shortening regimens for drug-sensitive TB and investigational regimens for treatment of multidrug-resistant TB; and (5) Translational work involving novel animal models of cavitary pulmonary TB disease to understand drug distribution in diseased lung.

    Research Areas: anti-infective drugs, antiretroviral therapies, tuberculosis and HIV treatments, HIV, lung disease, pharmacology, tuberculosis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Kelly Dooley, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kelly Metcalf Pate Lab

    The Kelly Metcalf Pate Lab focuses on the role of platelets in the innate immune response to viral infection, and how modulating the response of platelets to infection alters the course of disease.

    Platelets are known to participate in innate immunity through cytokine signaling and direct interactions with other cells, and the platelet has the potential to significantly influence disease outcomes. However, platelet immunology is still a relatively new discipline, and the downstream effects of platelet interactions with other immune cells have yet to be determined in the context of viral infection.

    Current research in our lab aims to further characterize the platelet-monocyte interaction during acute viral infection with the goals of establishing methods of pharmacologically manipulating this association, and establishing how platelet binding to a monocyte influences the monocyte's susceptibility to lentiviral infection and the monocyte's interactions with endothelium.

    Additio...nally, we are interested in the effect of physiologic stress on the platelet's future immune response to infection, and in the development and optimization of novel in vitro systems that better model in vivo conditions.
    view more

    Research Areas: immunology, platelets, viral infection, pharmacology

    Principal Investigator

    Kelly A. Metcalf Pate, D.V.M., Ph.D.

    Department

    Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology

  • Marshall Shuler Laboratory

    The Marshall Shuler Laboratory aims to understand the means by which brain reward systems convey reward value, expectancy, quality, probability and utility, and the rules by which such activity is used to affect synaptic weight within brain networks to encode stimulus-action associations. We use an interdisciplinary approach combining multisite recordings of neural activity, targeted pharmacological manipulation, viral-mediated gene transfer and behavior to study the neural mechanisms of reward-based interval learning in the primary visual cortex.

    Research Areas: neural circuits, reward-based systems, brain, vision, pharmacology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Marshall Shuler, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory

    The Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory is interested in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental diseases such as schizophrenia and autism. The major focus of our laboratory is to evaluate how adverse environmental factors and vulnerable genes interact to affect brain and behavior development. We address these experimental questions by using methods of cell and molecular biology, neuroimmunology, neurochemistry, psychopharmacology and developmental psychobiology. The current projects in our laboratory are: (1) Genetic risk factors in neuron-astrocyte interaction during neurodevelopment, (2) Gene-environment interplay in the pathogenesis of psychiatric conditions, and (3) The neuroimmune interactions in abnormal neurodevelopment

    Research Areas: autism, immunology, neurobiology, cell biology, neurodevelopment, developmental psychobiology, schizophrenia, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

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