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Displaying 11 to 16 of 16 results for pathophysiology

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  • Mark Donowitz Lab

    Research in the Mark Donowitz Lab is primarily focused on the development of drug therapy for diarrheal disorders, intestinal salt absorption and the proteins involved including their regulation, and the use of human enteroids to understand intestinal physiology and pathophysiology. We study two gene families initially recognized by this laboratory: mammalian Na/H exchangers and the subgroup of PDZ domain containing proteins present in the brush border of epithelial cells called NHERF family. A major finding is that NHE3 exists simultaneously in different sized complexes in the brush border, which change separately as part of signal transduction initiated by mimics of the digestive process. Relevance to the human intestine is being pursued using mini-human intestine made from Lgr5+ stems cells made from intestinal biopsies and measuring function via two-photon microscopy.

    Research Areas: gastrointestinal system, gastroenterology, pathophysiology, diarrhea, drugs, physiology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Donowitz, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Martin G. Pomper Lab

    Recent advances in molecular and cellular biology, the emergence of more sophisticated animal models of human disease and the development of sensitive, high-resolution imaging systems enable the study of pathophysiology noninvasively in unprecedented detail. The overall goal of our work is to develop new techniques and agents to study human disease through imaging. We concentrate on two areas, i.e., cancer and central nervous system processes. Our work extends from basic chemical and radiochemical synthesis to clinical translation.

    Research Areas: imaging, cancer

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Martin Pomper, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Radiology

  • Robert H. Brown Lab

    Work in the Robert H. Brown Lab explores several topics within pulmonary physiology, with a long-term goal of understanding the structural changes in the lungs that lead to the pathophysiology of lung disease. Our core studies examine the structure-function relationship of pulmonary airways and vessels as well as their role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reactive airway disease. Recent research has involved studying the mechanisms and treatment of COPD progression, new methods for treating asthma, and lung inflation and airway hyperresponsiveness. We are also exploring the impact of HIV infection on the etiology of lung disease and the pathophysiologic consequences of lung distention.

    Research Areas: asthma, HIV, pulmonary physiology, lung disease, COPD, reactive airway disease

  • Seth Margolis Laboratory

    The Seth Margolis Laboratory studies the signaling pathways that regulate synapse formation during normal brain development to try to understand how, when these pathways go awry, human cognitive disorders develop.

    We use Ephexin5 to study the molecular pathways that regulate restriction of excitatory synapse formation and their relevance to the pathophysiology of Angelman syndrome.

    Research Areas: cognition, Angelman syndrome, human development, cellular signaling, synapse formation

    Principal Investigator

    Seth Margolis, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Sheng Wu Laboratory

    The Sheng Wu Laboratory studies the insulin/androgen receptor (AR) actions on the developmental and regulation of the reproductive and metabolic functions. We use multiple animal models (obesity, androgen implantation, and conditional knockout) to investigate the pathophysiology of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and the developmental factors and their target tissues that contribute to PCOS manifestation.

    Research Areas: reproduction, insulin, polycystic ovarian syndrome, endocrinology, androgen receptor

    Principal Investigator

    Sheng Wu, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pediatrics

  • Steven Claypool Lab

    Research in the Claypool Lab is focused on defining how lipids and membrane proteins interact to establish and maintain normal mitochondrial function and how derangements in this complex relationship result in pathophysiology. We have demonstrated that yeast lacking tafazzin recapitulates all of the phospholipid abnormalities observed in human patients and many of the mitochondrial defects.

    Another major project in our lab focuses on the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier that is required for oxidative phosphorylation. Researchers are studying how these novel interactions help establish normal mitochondrial function, the biochemical details of these associations, and whether disturbances in these assemblies can contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, proteomics, lipids, yeast, mitochondria, oxidative phosphorylation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Steven Claypool, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

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