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Displaying 21 to 31 of 31 results for nervous system

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  • Robert Stevens Lab

    The Robert Stevens Lab seeks to generate a comprehensive anatomical and functional map of neural injury and repair following incidents such as trauma, stroke, anoxia and sepsis. Several projects have evaluated the relationship between critical illness and central or peripheral nervous system dysfunction. Ongoing projects deploy quantitative brain mapping to probe recovery of consciousness and cognitive function in patients who have experienced acute neurologic insults from trauma, stroke, cardiac arrest and sepsis.

    Research Areas: anoxia, stroke, trauma, sepsis, neural injury

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Stevens, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ronen Shechter Lab

    The Ronen Shechter Lab is currently investigating a novel treatment for nerve pain induced by chemotherapy. Our previous research has involved studying the role and mechanism of peripheral opioids as well as the use of dorsal column stimulation to treat pain resulting from a condition affecting the nervous system.

    Research Areas: chemotherapy, pain management, nerve pain

  • Seth Blackshaw Lab

    The Seth Blackshaw Lab uses functional genomics and proteomics to rapidly identify the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell specification and survival in both the retina and hypothalamus. We have profiled gene expression in both these tissues, from the start to the end of neurogenesis, characterizing the cellular expression patterns of more than 1,800 differentially expressed transcripts in both tissues. Working together with the lab of Heng Zhu in the Department of Pharmacology, we have also generated a protein microarray comprised of nearly 20,000 unique full-length human proteins, which we use to identify biochemical targets of developmentally important genes of interest.

    Research Areas: retina, central nervous system, biochemistry, hypothalamus, proteomics, genomics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Solomon Snyder Laboratory

    Information processing in the brain reflects communication among neurons via neurotransmitters. The Solomon Snyder Laboratory studies diverse signaling systems including those of neurotransmitters and second messengers as well as the actions of drugs upon these processes. We are interested in atypical neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and the D-isomers of certain amino acids, specifically D-serine and D-aspartate. Our discoveries are leading to a better understanding of how certain drugs for Parkinson's disease and Hungtington's disease interact with cells and proteins. Understanding how other second messengers work is giving us insight into anti-cancer therapies.

    Research Areas: Huntington's disease, amino acids, neurotransmitters, brain, cancer, nitric oxide, drugs, carbon monoxide, Parkinson's disease, nervous system

  • The Calabresi Lab

    The Calabresi Lab is located in the department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Our group investigates why remyelination occasionally fails following central nervous system demyelination in diseases like multiple sclerosis. Our primary focus is on discovering the role of t-cells in promoting or inhibiting myelination by the endogenous glial cells.

    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis, transverse myelitis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Calabresi, M.D.

    Department

    Neurology
    Neurosurgery

  • The Chen Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    The Chen laboratory is interested in understanding the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, developing diagnostic markers and validating therapeutic targets. The laboratory uses an interdisciplinary approach involving Drosophila model to study the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in human central nervous system.

    Research Areas: neurodegenerative diseases

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Liam Chen, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • The Sun Laboratory

    The nervous system has extremely complex RNA processing regulation. Dysfunction of RNA metabolism has emerged to play crucial roles in multiple neurological diseases. Mutations and pathologies of several RNA-binding proteins are found to be associated with neurodegeneration in both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). An alternative RNA-mediated toxicity arises from microsatellite repeat instability in the human genome. The expanded repeat-containing RNAs could potentially induce neuron toxicity by disrupting protein and RNA homeostasis through various mechanisms.

    The Sun Lab is interested in deciphering the RNA processing pathways altered by the ALS-causative mutants to uncover the mechanisms of toxicity and molecular basis of cell type-selective vulnerability. Another major focus of the group is to identify small molecule and genetic inhibitors of neuron toxic factors using various high-throughput screening platforms. Finally, we are also highly i...nterested in developing novel CRISPR technique-based therapeutic strategies. We seek to translate the mechanistic findings at molecular level to therapeutic target development to advance treatment options against neurodegenerative diseases. view more

    Research Areas: ALS, neurodegeneration, RNA

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Shuying Sun, Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Vestibular NeuroEngineering Lab

    Research in the Vestibular NeuroEngineering Lab (VNEL) focuses on restoring inner ear function through “bionic” electrical stimulation, inner ear gene therapy, and enhancing the central nervous system’s ability to learn ways to use sensory input from a damaged inner ear. VNEL research involves basic and applied neurophysiology, biomedical engineering, clinical investigation and population-based epidemiologic studies. We employ techniques including single-unit electrophysiologic recording; histologic examination; 3-D video-oculography and magnetic scleral search coil measurements of eye movements; microCT; micro MRI; and finite element analysis. Our research subjects include computer models, circuits, animals and humans. For more information about VNEL, click here.
    VNEL is currently recruiting subjects for two first-in-human clinical trials:
    1) The MVI Multichannel Vestibular Implant Trial involves implantation of a “bionic” inner ear stimulator intended to partially restore sensation... of head movement. Without that sensation, the brain’s image- and posture-stabilizing reflexes fail, so affected individuals suffer difficulty with blurry vision, unsteady walking, chronic dizziness, mental fogginess and a high risk of falling. Based on designs developed and tested successfully in animals over the past the past 15 years at VNEL, the system used in this trial is very similar to a cochlear implant (in fact, future versions could include cochlear electrodes for use in patients who also have hearing loss). Instead of a microphone and cochlear electrodes, it uses gyroscopes to sense head movement, and its electrodes are implanted in the vestibular labyrinth. For more information on the MVI trial, click here.
    2) The CGF166 Inner Ear Gene Therapy Trial involves inner ear injection of a genetically engineered DNA sequence intended to restore hearing and balance sensation by creating new sensory cells (called “hair cells”). Performed at VNEL with the support of Novartis and through a collaboration with the University of Kansas and Columbia University, this is the world’s first trial of inner ear gene therapy in human subjects. Individuals with severe or profound hearing loss in both ears are invited to participate. For more information on the CGF166 trial, click here.
    view more

    Research Areas: neuroengineering, audiology, multichannel vestibular prosthesis, balance disorders, balance, vestibular, prosthetics, cochlea, vestibular implant

  • Vikram Chib Lab

    The goals of the Vikram Chib Lab are to understand how the nervous system organizes the control of movement and how incentives motivate our behaviors. To better understand neurobiological control, our researchers are seeking to understand how motivational cues drive our motor actions. We use an interdisciplinary approach that combines robotics with the fields of neuroscience and economics to examine neuroeconomics and decision making, motion and force control, haptics and motor learning, image-guided surgery and soft-tissue mechanics.

    Research Areas: soft-tissue mechanics, robotics, motor learning, neuroeconomics, movement, neurobiological control, neuroscience, image-guided surgery, economics, decision making, nervous system

  • William Agnew Laboratory

    The Agnew Laboratory examines the structure, mechanism and regulation of ion channels that mediate the action potential in nerve and muscle, as well as intracellular calcium concentrations. Much of our work has centered on voltage-activated sodium channels responsible for the inward currents of the action potential. These studies encompass biochemical, molecular biological and biophysical studies of Na channel structure, gating and conductance mechanisms, the stages of channel biosynthesis and assembly, and mechanisms linked to channel neuromodulation.

    In recent molecular cloning and expression studies, we have characterized mutations in the human muscle sodium channel that appear to underlie certain inherited myopathies. New studies being pursued in our group also address the questions of structure, receptor properties, and biophysical behavior of intracellular calcium release channels activated by inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate. These channels are expressed at extremely high levels ...in selected cells of the central nervous system, and may play a role in modulating neuronal excitability. view less

    Research Areas: central nervous system, neuronal excitability, biophysiology, biochemistry, sodium channels, ion channels, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    William Agnew, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Zhou Lab

    In the Zhou Lab, the overall goal of our research is to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying development of the mammalian nervous system. Specifically, we are interested in understanding how neurons generate their complex morphology and form proper circuitries during development and how neurons regenerate to restore connections after brain or spinal cord injuries.

    Research Areas: orthopaedics, morphology, brain, spinal cord, neuroscience, nervous system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Feng-Quan Zhou, Ph.D.

    Department

    Orthopaedic Surgery

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