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Displaying 1 to 10 of 33 results for nervous system

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  • Albert Lau Lab

    The Lau Lab uses a combination of computational and experimental approaches to study the atomic and molecular details governing the function of protein complexes involved in intercellular communication. We study ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. iGluRs are important in synaptic plasticity, which underlies learning and memory. Receptor dysfunction has been implicated in a number of neurological disorders.

    Research Areas: central nervous system, synaptic plasticity, computational biology, intracellular communication, ionotropic glutamate receptors, neurological disorders

  • Alex Kolodkin Laboratory

    Research in the Alex Kolodkin Laboratory is focused on understanding how neuronal connectivity is established during development. Our work investigates the function of extrinsic guidance cues and their receptors on axonal guidance, dendritic morphology and synapse formation and function. We have investigated how neural circuits are formed and maintained through the action of guidance cues that include semaphorin proteins, their classical plexin and neuropilin receptors, and also novel receptors. We employ a cross-phylogenetic approach, using both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems, to understand how guidance cues regulate neuronal pathfinding, morphology and synaptogenesis. We also seek to understand how these signals are transduced to cytosolic effectors. Though broad in scope, our interrogation of the roles played by semaphorin guidance cues provides insight into the regulation of neural circuit assembly and function. Our current work includes a relatively new interest in ...understanding the origins of laminar organization in the central nervous system. view less

    Research Areas: central nervous system, neural circuits, neurodevelopment, neuronal connectivity, laminar organization

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Alex Kolodkin, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Allan Gottschalk Lab

    Research in the Allan Gottschalk Lab focuses on the mechanisms behind neuropathic pain, chronic pain related to nerve injury. We are investigating biophysical models of the impact of general anesthesia on the central nervous system; informational aspects of sensory perception and the representation of sensory input; nonlinear dynamics of respiratory pattern generation; and acute perioperative pain.

    Research Areas: sensory perception, nerve injury, central nervous system, neuropathy, neuropathic pain, anesthesia, pain

  • Andrew Laboratory: Center for Cell Dynamics

    Researchers in the Center for Cell Dynamics study spatially and temporally regulated molecular events in living cells, tissues and organisms. The team develops and applies innovative biosensors and imaging techniques to monitor dozens of critical signaling pathways in real time. The new tools help them investigate the fundamental cellular behaviors that underlie embryonic development, wound healing, cancer progression, and functions of the immune and nervous systems.

    Research Areas: immunology, cancer, epithelial tube, nervous system, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Deborah Andrew, M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Andrew McCallion Laboratory

    The McCallion Laboratory studies the roles played by cis-regulatory elements (REs) in controlling the timing, location and levels of gene activation (transcription). Their immediate goal is to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) combinations that can predict REs with cell-specific biological control--a first step in developing true regulatory lexicons.

    As a functional genetic laboratory, we develop and implement assays to rapidly determine the biological relevance of sequence elements within the human genome and the pathological relevance of variation therein. In recent years, we have developed a highly efficient reporter transgene system in zebrafish that can accurately evaluate the regulatory control of mammalian sequences, enabling characterization of reporter expression during development at a fraction of the cost of similar analyses in mice. We employ a range of strategies in model systems (zebrafish and mice), as well as analyses in the human population, to illu...minate the genetic basis of disease processes. Our long-term objective is to use these approaches in contributing to improved diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies in patient care. view more

    Research Areas: cell biology, genomics, gene regulation, nervous system

  • Aravinda Chakravarti's Lab

    Aravinda Chakravarti's Lab focuses on the development and applications of genetic, genomic, and computational technologies and perspectives for gene discovery in a variety of complex human diseases.

    Our goal is to assess how genomic information can be used in modern clinical medicine in the era of personalized medicine. Specifically, we use a variety of disease models to infer the features of complex disease gene architecture in birth defects (namely, Hirschsprung disease), cardiovascular disorders (including hypertension and sudden cardiac death) and mental illness (autism, bipolar disease and schizophrenia).

    Research Areas: autism, computational biology, hypertension, cardiovascular, genomics, population genetics, Hirschsprung's Disease, sudden cardiac death, nervous system

    Principal Investigator

    Aravinda Chakravarti, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Bradley Undem Lab

    Research in the Bradley Undem Lab centers around the hypothesis that the peripheral nervous system is directly involved in the processes of inflammation. This hypothesis is being studied primarily in the central airways and sympathetic ganglia. We are addressing this in a multidisciplinary fashion, using pharmacological, electrophysiological, biochemical and anatomical methodologies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, electrophysiology, inflammation, pharmacology, nervous system

    Principal Investigator

    Bradley Undem, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Brain Science Institute (BSi)

    The Brain Science Institute (BSi) brings together both basic and clinical neuroscientists from across the Johns Hopkins campuses. The BSi represents one of the largest and most diverse groups in the university. The BSi's mission is to solve fundamental questions about brain development and function and to use these insights to understand the mechanisms of brain disease. This new knowledge will provide the catalyst for the facilitation and development of effective therapies. The goals of our research are to foster new programs in basic neuroscience discovery; initiate a translational research program that will develop new treatments for brain-based diseases; and encourage collaboration, interdisciplinary teams, and new thinking that will have a global influence on research and treatment of the nervous system.

    Research Areas: brain, neuroscience, neurology, nervous system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jeffrey Rothstein, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • Center for Nanomedicine

    The Center for Nanomedicine engineers drug and gene delivery technologies that have significant implications for the prevention, treatment and cure of many major diseases facing the world today. Specifically, we are focusing on the eye, central nervous system, respiratory system, women's health, gastrointestinal system, cancer, and inflammation.

    We are a unique translational nanotechnology effort located that brings together engineers, scientists and clinicians working under one roof on translation of novel drug and gene delivery technologies

    Research Areas: central nervous system, respiratory system, nanotechnology, cancer, drugs, women's health, inflammation, eye, gastrointestinal

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Justin Hanes, Ph.D.

    Department

    Ophthalmology

  • Computational Neuroscience Laboratory

    In the computational neuroscience Laboratory, we construct quantitative models of biological nervous systems that are firmly based on their neurophysiology, neuroanatomy and behavior, and that are developed in close interaction with experimentalists. Our main interest is neuronal function at the system level, reflecting the interaction of subsystems to generate useful behavior. Modeling is particularly important for understanding this and other system-level functions, since it requires the interaction of several pathways and neural functions.

    One of the functions we study is selective attention--that is, the capability of higher animals to scan sensory input for the most important information and to discard all other. Models of the neuronal basis of visual selective attention are constructed by simulating them on digital computers and comparing the results with data obtained from the visual and somatosensory systems of primates. We pay particular attention to the mechanisms involvi...ng the implementation of neural mechanisms that make use of the temporal structure of neuronal firing, rather than just the average firing rate. view more

    Research Areas: neuronal function, neuroanatomy, selective attention, neurophysiology, nervous system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Ernst Niebur, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

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