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Displaying 1 to 6 of 6 results for multiple sclerosis

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  • Haughey Lab: Neurodegenerative and Neuroinfectious Disease

    Dr. Haughey directs a disease-oriented research program that address questions in basic neurobiology, and clinical neurology. The primary research interests of the laboratory are:

    1. To identify biomarkers markers for neurodegenerative diseases including HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders, Multiple Sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. In these studies, blood and cerebral spinal fluid samples obtained from ongoing clinical studies are analyzed for metabolic profiles through a variety of biochemical, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic techniques. These biomarkers can then be used in the diagnosis of disease, as prognostic indicators to predict disease trajectory, or as surrogate markers to track the effectiveness of disease modifying interventions.
    2. To better understand how the lipid components of neuronal, and glial membranes interact with proteins to regulate signal transduction associated with differentiation, motility, inflammatory signaling, survival, and neuronal excitab...ility.
    3. To understand how extracellular vesicles (exosomes) released from brain resident cells regulate neuronal excitability, neural network activity, and peripheral immune responses to central nervous system damage and infections.
    4. To develop small molecule therapeutics that regulate lipid metabolism as a neuroprotective and restorative strategy for neurodegenerative conditions.
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    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis, PTSD, HAND, HIV

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Norman Haughey, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology
    Neurosurgery

  • Michael Kornberg Lab

    Our laboratory conducts basic and translational research aimed at better understanding the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the role of the immune system in CNS disease, particularly the processes that drive progressive disability such as neurodegeneration and remyelination failure. We currently have three parallel research programs: 1. Metabolism as a modulator of MS: We are studying how basic metabolic pathways regulate the immune system and how these pathways might be exploited to protect neurons and myelin-forming oligodendrocytes from injury. 2. Identifying pathways by which nitric oxide (NO) and other free radicals cause neuronal and axonal damage. Our lab is identifying specific signaling pathways initiated by NO and other free radicals that can be targeted by drugs to produce neuroprotection. 3. Modulating the innate immune system in MS: In collaboration with others at Johns Hopkins, we are studying ways to enhance the reparative functions of microglia while preventi...ng maladaptive responses. This work has identified bryostatin-1 as a potential drug that may be re-purposed for this task. view more

    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis

  • Multiple Sclerosis Rehabilitation Research Program

    Abbey J. Hughes, Ph.D., and Meghan Beier, Ph.D., are clinical psychologists, co-investigators and grant-funded clinical researchers specializing in neurorehabilitation psychology and multiple sclerosis. Dr. Hughes' research focuses on health behaviors and their impact on cognitive dysfunction in people with multiple sclerosis. Dr. Beier's research focuses on characterizing emotional and cognitive symptoms common among people with MS, refining neuropsychological assessment techniques, and developing interventions to ameliorate or slow MS-related cognitive decline.

    Research Areas: neuropsychology, psychology, multiple sclerosis, cognition, behavioral research, sleep medicine, rehabilitation

  • Neuroimmunopathology Lab

    The research activities of the Neuroimmunopathology Laboratory focus on studies of immunological and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Our main areas of research include studies of neurological complications of HIV infection and AIDS, multiple sclerosis, transverse myelitis, autism and epilepsy. We seek to explore and identify immunopathological mechanisms associated with neurological disease that may be the target of potential therapeutic interventions. The laboratory collaborates with other researchers and laboratories at Johns Hopkins and other institutions in projects related with studies of the interaction between the immune and central nervous systems in pathological processes leading to neurological dysfunction.

    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis, autism, epilepsy, HIV, transverse myelitis

    Principal Investigator

    Carlos Pardo-Villamizar, M.D.

    Department

    Neurology
    Neurosurgery

  • Schneck Lab

    Effective immune responses are critical for control of a variety of infectious disease including bacterial, viral and protozoan infections as well as in protection from development of tumors. Central to the development of an effective immune response is the T lymphocyte which, as part of the adaptive immune system, is central in achieving sterilization and long lasting immunity. While the normal immune responses is tightly regulated there are also notable defects leading to pathologic diseases. Inactivity of tumor antigen-specific T cells, either by suppression or passive ignorance allows tumors to grow and eventually actively suppress the immune response. Conversely, hyperactivation of antigen-specific T cells to self antigens is the underlying basis for many autoimmune diseases including: multiple sclerosis; arthritis; and diabetes. Secondary to their central role in a wide variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic responses my lab takes a broad-based approach to studying T cell re...sponses. view more

    Research Areas: t-cell responses, pathologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, pathology, immune system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • The Calabresi Lab

    The Calabresi Lab is located in the department of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Our group investigates why remyelination occasionally fails following central nervous system demyelination in diseases like multiple sclerosis. Our primary focus is on discovering the role of t-cells in promoting or inhibiting myelination by the endogenous glial cells.

    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis, transverse myelitis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Calabresi, M.D.

    Department

    Neurology
    Neurosurgery

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