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Displaying 31 to 40 of 42 results for molecular biology

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  • Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory

    The Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory uses the developing spinal cord as our major paradigm to define the mechanisms that maintain an undifferentiated progenitor state and the molecular pathways that trigger their differentiation into neurons and glia. The major focus of the lab is the study of a new family of six-transmembrane proteins (6-TM GDEs) that play key roles in regulating neuronal and glial differentiation in the spinal cord. We recently discovered that the 6-TM GDEs release GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface through cleavage of the GPI-anchor. This discovery identifies 6-TM GDEs as the first vertebrate membrane bound GPI-cleaving enzymes that work at the cell surface to regulate GPI-anchored protein function. Current work in the lab involves defining how the 6-TM GDEs regulate cellular signaling events that control neuronal and glial differentiation and function, with a major focus on how GDE dysfunction relates to the onset and progression of disease. To solve the...se questions, we use an integrated approach that includes in vivo models, imaging, molecular biology, biochemistry, developmental biology, genetics and behavior. view less

    Research Areas: glia, biochemistry, neurons, imaging, developmental biology, genomics, spinal cord, behavior, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Shanthini Sockanathan, D.Phil.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Shigeki Watanabe Lab

    Research in the Shigeki Watanabe Lab focuses on the cellular and molecular characterizations of rapid changes that occur during synaptic plasticity. Our team is working to determine the composition and distribution of proteins and lipids in the synapse as well as understand how the activity alters their distribution. Ultimately, we seek to discover how the misregulation of protein and lipid compositions lead to synaptic dysfunction. Our studies make use of cutting-edge electron microscopy techniques in combination with biochemical and molecular approaches.

    Research Areas: microscopy, cell biology, proteins, lipids, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Shigeki Watanabe, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Steven Beaudry Lab

    Research in the Steven Beaudry Lab aims to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind cardiovascular disease in pregnancy. Our goal is to develop more effective treatments and improve patient outcomes.

    Research Areas: cell biology, cardiovascular diseases, pregnancy, molecular biology

  • Structural Enzymology and Thermodynamics Group

    The Structural Enzymology and Thermodynamics Group uses a combination of molecular biology, biochemistry and structural biology to understand the catalytic mechanisms of several enzyme families. Additionally, researchers in the group are studying protein-ligand interactions using structural dynamics. They are able to apply their knowledge of the mechanisms of these enzymes and of binding energetics to develop targets for drug design.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, enzymes, structural biology, molecular biology

  • Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory

    The research in the Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory is focused on the molecular mechanisms that regulate copper concentration in normal and diseased human cells. Copper is essential for human cell homeostasis. It is required for embryonic development and neuronal function, and the disruption of copper transport in human cells results in severe multisystem disorders, such as Menkes disease and Wilson's disease. To understand the molecular mechanisms of copper homeostasis in normal and diseased human cells, we utilize a multidisciplinary approach involving biochemical and biophysical studies of molecules involved in copper transport, cell biological studies of copper signaling, and analysis of copper-induced pathologies using Wilson's disease gene knock-out mice.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, menkes disease, Wilson's disease, cell biology, multisystem disorders, physiology, copper, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Svetlana Lutsenko, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Tamara O'Connor Lab

    The O'Connor Lab studies the molecular basis of infectious disease using Legionella pneumophila pathogenesis as a model system.

    We are looking at the network of molecular interactions acting at the host-pathogen interface. Specifically, we use L. pneumophila pathogenesis to examine the numerous mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen can establish infection, how it exploits host cell machinery to accomplish this, and how individual proteins and their component pathways coordinately contribute to disease.

    We are also studying the role of environmental hosts in the evolution of human pathogens. Using genetics and functional genomics, we compare and contrast the repertoires of virulence proteins required for growth in a broad assortment of hosts, how the network of molecular interactions differs between hosts, and the mechanisms by which L. pneumophila copes with this variation.

    Research Areas: infectious disease, Legionella pneumophila, genomics, pathogenesis, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Tamara O'Connor, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • The Nauen Lab

    Epilepsy affects 1-3% of the population and can have a profound impact on general health, employment and quality of life. Medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) develops in some patients following head injury or repeated febrile seizures. Those affected may first suffer spontaneous seizures many years after the initial insult, indicating that the neural circuit undergoes a slow pathologic remodeling over the interim. There are currently no methods of preventing the development of MTLE. It is our goal to better understand the process in order to slow, halt, and ultimately reverse it.

    Our laboratory draws on electrophysiology, molecular biology, and morphology to study the contribution of dysregulated neurogenesis and newborn neuron connectivity to the development of MTLE. We build on basic research in stem cell biology, hippocampal development, and synaptic plasticity. We work closely with colleagues in the Institute for Cell Engineering, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Biomedical Engineering..., and Radiology. As physician neuropathologists our grounding is in tissue alterations underlying human neurologic disease; using human iPSC-derived neurons and surgical specimens we focus on the pathophysiological processes as they occur in patients.

    By understanding changes in cell populations and morphologies that affect the circuit, and identifying pathologic alterations in gene expression that lead to the cell-level abnormalities, we hope to find treatment targets that can prevent the remodeling and break the feedback loop of abnormal activity > circuit change > abnormal activity.
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    Research Areas: Medial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    David Nauen, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Theresa Shapiro Laboratory

    The Theresa Shapiro Laboratory studies antiparasitic chemotherapy. On a molecular basis, we are interested in understanding the mechanism of action for existing antiparasitic agents, and in identifying vulnerable metabolic targets for much-needed, new, antiparasitic chemotherapy. Clinically, our studies are directed toward an evaluation, in humans, of the efficacy, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and safety of experimental antiparasitic drugs.

    Research Areas: sleeping sickness, infectious disease, drugs, malaria, pharmacology, antiparasitic chemotherapy, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Theresa Shapiro, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Wei Dong Gao Lab

    Work in the Wei Dong Gao Lab primarily focuses on heart failure and defining molecular and cellular mechanisms of contractile dysfunction. We use molecular biology and proteomic techniques to investigate the changes that myofilament proteins undergo during heart failure and under drug therapy. We're working to determine the molecular nature of nitroxyl (HNO) modification of tropomyosin.

    Research Areas: heart disease, contractile dysfunction, heart failure, cardiovascular diseases, molecular biology

  • William Agnew Laboratory

    The Agnew Laboratory examines the structure, mechanism and regulation of ion channels that mediate the action potential in nerve and muscle, as well as intracellular calcium concentrations. Much of our work has centered on voltage-activated sodium channels responsible for the inward currents of the action potential. These studies encompass biochemical, molecular biological and biophysical studies of Na channel structure, gating and conductance mechanisms, the stages of channel biosynthesis and assembly, and mechanisms linked to channel neuromodulation.

    In recent molecular cloning and expression studies, we have characterized mutations in the human muscle sodium channel that appear to underlie certain inherited myopathies. New studies being pursued in our group also address the questions of structure, receptor properties, and biophysical behavior of intracellular calcium release channels activated by inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate. These channels are expressed at extremely high levels ...in selected cells of the central nervous system, and may play a role in modulating neuronal excitability. view more

    Research Areas: central nervous system, neuronal excitability, biophysiology, biochemistry, sodium channels, ion channels, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    William Agnew, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

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