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Displaying 1 to 5 of 5 results for mitochondria

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  • Bioenergetics Core

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has long been a consistent observation in Parkinson's disease. To understand the consequences of Parkinson's disease causing genetic mutations on the function of mitochondria, the Bioenergetics Core B will provide the following analyses to the projects in the Udall Center at Johns Hopkins: (1) Measuring rates of respiration, oxygen consumption and ATP generation, (2) Measuring calcium dynamics, (3) Measuring reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, (4) Measuring the activity of the electron transport chain enzymes and metabolic enzymes, and (5) Measuring plasma versus mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane permeability

    Research Areas: enzymes, cell biology, bioenergetics, respiration, Parkinson's disease, mitochondria, neurology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Valina Dawson, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • Courtney Robertson Lab

    Work in the Courtney Robertson Lab is focused on identifying interventions that could minimize the neurological deficits that can persist after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). One study used a preclinical model to examine potential disruption of mitochondrial function and alterations in cerebral metabolism. It was found that a substantial amount of mitochondrial dysfunction is present in the first six hours after TBI. In addition, we are using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to evaluate global and regional alterations in brain metabolism after TBI. We're also collaborating with researchers at the University of Pennsylvania to compare mitochondrial function after head injury in different clinically relevant models.

    Research Areas: traumatic brain injuries, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, pediatrics, mitochondria, pediatric critical care medicine

  • Pedersen Laboratory

    The Pedersen Laboratory is interested in cell energetics and the relationship of cell energetics to molecular medicine and disease. Both mitochondrial and glycolytic processes are being studied at the tissue, cell, and molecular level. Also, the relationship of these processes to cancer and heart disease, the two major causes of death in the U.S., is being studied with the objective of discovering and developing new therapies.

    Specific projects in the laboratory that are currently under investigation include: 1) The structure, mechanism, and regulation of the mitochondrial ATP synthase/ATPase complex; 2) The molecular basis of cancer's most common phenotype, i.e., an elevated glucose metabolism; and 3) The regulation of heart function under normal and ischemic conditions as it relates to the mitochondrial ATP synthase/ATPase complex.

    Our team consists of chemists, biologists and clinicians who work together in a highly collaborative environment.

    Research Areas: heart disease, cancer, cell energetics, mitochondria, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Pedersen, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Sesaki Lab

    The Sesaki Lab is interested in the molecular mechanisms and physiological roles of mitochondrial fusion. Mitochondria are highly dynamic and control their morphology by a balance of fusion and fission. The regulation of membrane fusion and fission generates a striking diversity of mitochondrial shapes, ranging from numerous small spheres in hepatocytes to long branched tubules in myotubes. In addition to shape and number, mitochondrial fusion is critical for normal organelle function.

    Research Areas: brain, mitochondrial fusion, mitochondria, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Hiromi Sesaki, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Steven Claypool Lab

    Research in the Claypool Lab is focused on defining how lipids and membrane proteins interact to establish and maintain normal mitochondrial function and how derangements in this complex relationship result in pathophysiology. We have demonstrated that yeast lacking tafazzin recapitulates all of the phospholipid abnormalities observed in human patients and many of the mitochondrial defects.

    Another major project in our lab focuses on the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier that is required for oxidative phosphorylation. Researchers are studying how these novel interactions help establish normal mitochondrial function, the biochemical details of these associations, and whether disturbances in these assemblies can contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, proteomics, lipids, yeast, mitochondria, oxidative phosphorylation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Steven Claypool, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

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