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Displaying 1 to 20 of 26 results for metabolism

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  • Anderson Lab

    Research in the Anderson laboratory focuses on cellular signaling and ionic mechanisms that cause heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, major public health problems worldwide. Primary focus is on the multifunctional Ca2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). The laboratory identified CaMKII as an important pro-arrhythmic and pro-cardiomyopathic signal, and its studies have provided proof of concept evidence motivating active efforts in biotech and the pharmaceutical industry to develop therapeutic CaMKII inhibitory drugs to treat heart failure and arrhythmias.

    Under physiological conditions, CaMKII is important for excitation-contraction coupling and fight or flight increases in heart rate. However, myocardial CaMKII is excessively activated during disease conditions where it contributes to loss of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, membrane hyperexcitability, premature cell death, and hypertrophic and inflammatory transcription. These downstream targets a...ppear to contribute coordinately and decisively to heart failure and arrhythmias. Recently, researchers developed evidence that CaMKII also participates in asthma.

    Efforts at the laboratory, funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, are highly collaborative and involve undergraduate assistants, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty. Key areas of focus are:
    • Ion channel biology and arrhythmias
    • Cardiac pacemaker physiology and disease
    • Molecular physiology of CaMKII
    • Myocardial and mitochondrial metabolism
    • CaMKII and reactive oxygen species in asthma

    Mark Anderson, MD, is the William Osler Professor of Medicine, the director of the Department of Medicine in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and physician-in-chief of The Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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    Research Areas: heart failure, arrhythmia, cardiovascular diseases, sudden cardiac death

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Anderson, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Charles W. Flexner Laboratory

    A. Laboratory activities include the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) techniques to measure intracellular drugs and drugs metabolites. AMS is a highly sensitive method for detecting tracer amounts of radio-labeled molecules in cells, tissues, and body fluids. We have been able to measure intracellular zidovudine triphosphate (the active anabolite of zidovudine) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers given small doses of 14C-zidovudine, and have directly compared the sensitivity of AMS to traditional LC/MS methods carried out in our laboratory.

    B. Clinical research activities investigate the clinical pharmacology of new anti-HIV therapies and drug combinations. Specific drug classes studied include HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, entry inhibitors (selective CCR5 and CXCR4 antagonists), and integrase inhibitors. Scientific objectives of clinical studies include characterization of early drug activity, toxicity, and pharmacok...inetics. Additional objectives are characterization of pathways of drug metabolism, and identification of clinically significant harmful and beneficial drug interactions mediated by hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P450 isoforms. view less

    Research Areas: antiretroviral drugs, infectious disease, HIV protease inhibitors, HIV, drugs, accelerator mass spectrometry

    Principal Investigator

    Charles Flexner, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Courtney Robertson Lab

    Work in the Courtney Robertson Lab is focused on identifying interventions that could minimize the neurological deficits that can persist after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). One study used a preclinical model to examine potential disruption of mitochondrial function and alterations in cerebral metabolism. It was found that a substantial amount of mitochondrial dysfunction is present in the first six hours after TBI. In addition, we are using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to evaluate global and regional alterations in brain metabolism after TBI. We're also collaborating with researchers at the University of Pennsylvania to compare mitochondrial function after head injury in different clinically relevant models.

    Research Areas: traumatic brain injuries, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, pediatrics, mitochondria, pediatric critical care medicine

  • Drug Discovery Group

    Barbara Slusher, M.A.S., Ph.D., leads a 20-member veteran drug discovery team of medicinal chemists, assay developers, pharmacologists, toxicologists and pharmacokinetic/drug metabolism experts, who identify novel drug targets arising from JHU faculty’s research and translate them into new, small molecule drug therapies.

    Her team collaborates extensively with faculty at the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy and leads the BKI immunotherapy drug discovery core, aimed at developing new immune-targeting drug therapies for laboratory and clinical testing at Johns Hopkins.

    Research Areas: glutamine antagonist, drug discovery, cancer, immunotherapy, cancer metabolism

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Barbara Slusher, M.A.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Foster Lab

    The Foster Lab uses the tools of protein biochemistry and proteomics to tackle fundamental problems in the fields of cardiac preconditioning and heart failure. Protein networks are perturbed in heart disease in a manner that correlates only weakly with changes in mRNA transcripts. Moreover, proteomic techniques afford the systematic assessment of post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of proteins responsible for every aspect of heart function from electrical excitation to contraction and metabolism. Understanding the status of protein networks in the diseased state is, therefore, key to discovering new therapies.

    D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, and serves as Director of the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


    Research Areas: proteomics, protein biochemistry, heart failure, cardiology, cardiac preconditioning, cardiomyopathy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    D. Brian Foster, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Frederick Anokye-Danso Lab

    The Frederick Anokye-Danso Lab investigates the biological pathways at work in the separation of human pluripotent stem cells into adipocytes and pancreatic beta cells. We focus in particular on determinant factors of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, such as the P72R polymorphism of p53. We also conduct research on the reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells using miRNAs.

    Research Areas: stem cells, obesity, metabolism, biology

    Principal Investigator

    Frederick Anokye-Danso, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Guang William Wong Lab

    The Wong Lab seeks to understand mechanisms employed by cells and tissues to maintain metabolic homeostasis. We are currently addressing how adipose- and skeletal muscle-derived hormones (adipokines and myokines), discovered in our lab, regulate tissue crosstalk and signaling pathways to control energy metabolism. We use transgenic and knockout mouse models, as well as cell culture systems, to address the role of the CTRP family of hormones in physiological and disease states. We also aim to identify the receptors that mediate the biological functions of CTRPs.

    Research Areas: energy metabolism, insulin resistance, hormones, diabetes, metabolic homeostasis

    Principal Investigator

    Guang Wong, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Haughey Lab: Neurodegenerative and Neuroinfectious Disease

    Dr. Haughey directs a disease-oriented research program that address questions in basic neurobiology, and clinical neurology. The primary research interests of the laboratory are:

    1. To identify biomarkers markers for neurodegenerative diseases including HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders, Multiple Sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. In these studies, blood and cerebral spinal fluid samples obtained from ongoing clinical studies are analyzed for metabolic profiles through a variety of biochemical, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic techniques. These biomarkers can then be used in the diagnosis of disease, as prognostic indicators to predict disease trajectory, or as surrogate markers to track the effectiveness of disease modifying interventions.
    2. To better understand how the lipid components of neuronal, and glial membranes interact with proteins to regulate signal transduction associated with differentiation, motility, inflammatory signaling, survival, and neuronal excitab...ility.
    3. To understand how extracellular vesicles (exosomes) released from brain resident cells regulate neuronal excitability, neural network activity, and peripheral immune responses to central nervous system damage and infections.
    4. To develop small molecule therapeutics that regulate lipid metabolism as a neuroprotective and restorative strategy for neurodegenerative conditions.
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    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis, PTSD, HAND, HIV

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Norman Haughey, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology
    Neurosurgery

  • James Barrow Laboratory

    The James Barrow Laboratory studies drug discovery at the Lieber Institute. He leads research related to medicinal chemistry, biology, and drug metabolism, with the goal of validating novel mechanisms and advancing treatments for disorders of brain development.

    Research Areas: brain development, drugs, chemistry, biology

  • Jonathan D. Powell Lab

    The program in cancer and immunometabolism seeks to both understand and target metabolic programming in both the cancer and immune cells in order to enhance immunotherapy for cancer. To this end, in collaboration in with the Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery Program, the lab is developing novel agents that target tumor glutamine metabolism. These compounds not only inhibit tumor growth but render tumors more susceptible to immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade and adoptive cellular therapy. Additionally, the group is dissecting key metabolic pathways that regulate immune cell activation, differentiation and function. By targeting these pathways, they are discovering new ways to both enhance the efficacy of antitumor T cells as well as inhibit T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Research Areas: T cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Powell, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Joseph Cofrancesco Jr. Lab

    Research in the Joseph Cofrancesco Jr. Lab focuses primarily on health care for HIV-positive patients. Our recent studies have explored topics such as HIV antiretroviral treatments, HIV resistance and the long-term complications of HIV treatment. In addition, we are part of the U.S. Fat Redistribution and Metabolism (FRAM) study and have had a long-standing involvement in projects that examine metabolic and fat complications in Thailand.

    Research Areas: antiretroviral therapies, infectious disease, AIDS, disease resistance, metabolism, HIV

    Principal Investigator

    Joseph Cofrancesco, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kristine Glunde Lab

    The Glunde lab is within the Division of Cancer Imaging Research in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. The lab is developing mass spectrometry imaging as part of multimodal molecular imaging workflows to image and elucidate hypoxia-driven signaling pathways in breast cancer. They are working to further unravel the molecular basis of the aberrant choline phospholipid metabolism in cancer. The Glunde lab is developing novel optical imaging agents for multi-scale molecular imaging of lysosomes in breast tumors and discovering structural changes in Collagen I matrices and their role in breast cancer and metastasis.

    Research Areas: breast cancer, mass spectrometry, imaging, cancer, metastasis, metabolism, optical imaging

  • Le Cancer Metabolism Research Lab

    Dr. Anne Le's research primarily focuses on cancer metabolism and metabolic aspects of other diseases. Using metabolomics technologies, her work has led to breakthrough discoveries revealing several characteristic features of the metabolism of cancer. One of these, the dependence of cancer cells on glutamine metabolism, has translated into clinical trials as a novel therapy for cancer patients. Furthermore, her lab tracked the metabolic pathways in the remaining tumor cells after this novel therapy and identified the best-suited drugs for combined synergistic therapy. The depth of Dr. Le's expertise in cancer metabolism, in collaboration with other experts at Johns Hopkins, will lead to improved outcomes for cancer therapy.

    Research Areas: cancer, metabolomics technologies, cancer metabolism

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Anne Le, H.D.R., M.D., M.S.

    Department

    Oncology
    Pathology

  • Marie-France Penet Lab

    The Penet lab is within the Division of Cancer Imaging Research in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. The lab research focuses on using multimodal imaging techniques to better understand the microenvironment and improve cancer early detection, especially in ovarian cancer. By combining MRI, MRS and optical imaging, we are studying the tumor microenvironment to understand the role of hypoxia, tumor vascularization, macromolecular transport and tumor metabolism in tumor progression, metastasis and ascites formation in orthotopic models of cancer. We also are studying the role of tumor-associated macrophages in tumor progression.

    Research Areas: tumor vascularization, prostate cancer, tumor metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, macromolecular transport, optical imaging, pancreatic cancer, MRI, tumor-associated macrophages, hypoxia, ovarian cancer, cancer-induced cachexia, cancer imaging

  • Michael Kornberg Lab

    Our laboratory conducts basic and translational research aimed at better understanding the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the role of the immune system in CNS disease, particularly the processes that drive progressive disability such as neurodegeneration and remyelination failure. We currently have three parallel research programs: 1. Metabolism as a modulator of MS: We are studying how basic metabolic pathways regulate the immune system and how these pathways might be exploited to protect neurons and myelin-forming oligodendrocytes from injury. 2. Identifying pathways by which nitric oxide (NO) and other free radicals cause neuronal and axonal damage. Our lab is identifying specific signaling pathways initiated by NO and other free radicals that can be targeted by drugs to produce neuroprotection. 3. Modulating the innate immune system in MS: In collaboration with others at Johns Hopkins, we are studying ways to enhance the reparative functions of microglia while preventi...ng maladaptive responses. This work has identified bryostatin-1 as a potential drug that may be re-purposed for this task. view more

    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis

  • MR Research Laboratory

    The MR Research Laboratory focuses on developing and applying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and on measuring energy metabolites and metabolic fluxes with phosphorous (31P) and proton (1H) MRS in patients with ischemia, infarction and heart failure.

    Specific studies include: Phosphorus MR studies of myocardial energy metabolism in human heart: We have used spatially localized phosphorus MR spectroscopy (MRS) to noninvasively measure high-energy phosphate metabolites such as ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and phosphocreatine (PCr) in the heart. The PCr/ATP ratio can change during stress-induced ischemia, and a protocol for stress-testing in the MR system has been developed which can detect the changes noninvasively in the anterior wall. Additionally, we've developed methods for noninvasively measuring the creatine kinase (CK) ATP energy supply and used it to measure the CK ATP energy supply in the healthy heart at rest and exercise, in human myocardial infarction, and in ...human heart failure.

    Interventional MRI technology: We are developing an RF dosimeter that measures incident-specific absorption rates applied during MRI independent of the scanner and developing MRI-safe internal detectors for higher field use. Outcomes of this research include the "MRI endoscope" that provides real-time, high-resolution views of vessel anatomy and a radiometric approach to detect any local heating associated with the device.
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    Research Areas: infarction, magnetic resonance, creatine kinase metabolism, heart failure, MRI, ischemic disease, nuclear magnetic resonance

  • Namandje N. Bumpus Lab

    The Bumpus Laboratory uses mass spectrometry and molecular pharmacology-based approaches to study the biotransformation of clinically used drugs by the cytochromes P450s. Specifically, we are studying ways to define a role for cytochrome P450-dependent metabolites in the drug-induced acute liver failure that is associated with certain antiviral drugs used to treat HIV and hepatitis C. Our long-term goal is to gain information that can be used to develop therapies that are devoid of toxic events by preventing the formation of a toxic metabolite or by developing strategies for preventing toxicity using concomitant therapy.

    Research Areas: antiviral therapy, drug metabolism, mass spectrometry, HIV, drugs, cellular signaling, cytochromes P450, pharmacology, molecular pharmacology, hepatitis C, metabolomics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Namandje Bumpus, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Noah Lechtzin Lab

    Research in the Noah Lechtzin Lab investigates several important aspects of cystic fibrosis (CF), including the impact of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in CF patients and new therapy options for individuals with CF. Our research into new CF therapies has included studies on home electronic symptom and lung function monitoring, transbronchial needle aspiration and bedside percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement. We also explore the role of metabolic complications in CF patients by examining how the disease is impacted by factors such as vitamin D deficiency, osteoporosis and testosterone deficiency.

    Research Areas: osteoporosis, cystic fibrosis, pulmonary medicine, metabolism, antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, testosterone

    Principal Investigator

    Noah Lechtzin, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Rita Kalyani Lab

    Research in the Rita Kalyani Lab examines the decreased physical functioning observed in patients with diabetes as they age. Through several ongoing epidemiological cohorts, we are investigating the association of high blood glucose and high insulin levels with accelerated muscle loss, and possible contributions to the physical disability observed in diabetes. We are currently involved in clinical studies that aim to understand the underlying mechanisms for these associations and to facilitate the development of novel strategies to prevent muscle loss and disability in people with diabetes.

    Research Areas: metabolism, insulin, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, endocrinology, blood glucose

    Principal Investigator

    Rita Kalyani, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Suzanne Jan de Beur Lab

    Researchers in the Suzanne Jan de Beur Lab are interested in bone and mineral metabolism, endocrinology and osteoporosis. In addition, we focus on hormonal regulators of phosphate homeostasis, parathyroid hormone signaling and the molecular basis of hypophosphatemic disorders.

    Research Areas: osteoporosis, metabolism, diabetes, endocrinology

    Principal Investigator

    Suzanne Jan De Beur, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

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