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Displaying 21 to 30 of 38 results for inflammation

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  • Maryam Jahromi Lab

    The Maryam Jahromi Lab researches infectious diseases such as influenza, tuberculosis, endocarditis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, brucellosis, Clostridium difficile and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. We are particularly interested in the impact of the influenza vaccine on systemic inflammation. Recent areas of focus include the relationship between influenza vaccination and cardiovascular outcomes, the emergence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran, and prospects for vaccines and therapies for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    Research Areas: vaccines, infectious disease, patient outcomes, inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, flu, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

    Principal Investigator

    Maryam Keshtkar Jahromi, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Michael Caterina Lab

    The Caterina lab is focused on dissecting mechanisms underlying acute and chronic pain sensation. We use a wide range of approaches, including mouse genetics, imaging, electrophysiology, behavior, cell culture, biochemistry and neuroanatomy to tease apart the molecular and cellular contributors to pathological pain sensation. A few of the current projects in the lab focus on defining the roles of specific subpopulations of neuronal and non-neuronal cells to pain sensation, defining the role of RNA binding proteins in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, and understanding how rare skin diseases known as palmoplantar keratodermas lead to severe pain in the hands and feet.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, inflammation, pain

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Caterina, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurosurgery

  • Nicola Heller Lab

    Research in the Nicola Heller Lab focuses on the immunobiology of macrophages. Our team explores how these cells impact diseases with an inflammatory element, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity. Using a variety of techniques, including molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, mouse models and more, we study the role of IL-4/IL-13 signaling in asthma and allergic disease, as well as the role of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. Currently, we are researching the links between asthma and obesity, with a focus on the roles of gender and race.

    Research Areas: asthma, allergies, immunobiology, inflammation, macrophages

  • Peter Abadir Lab

    Research in the Peter Abadir Lab focuses on the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), a signaling pathway that regulates blood pressure and has been linked independently to both aging and inflammation. We’re particularly interested in changes in RAS that occur with aging. We also study signal transduction and the role of the crosstalk between angiotensin II receptor in aging and are interested in understanding the function of angiotensin II in the process of vascular aging.

    Research Areas: renin-angiotensin system, aging, inflammation, gerontology

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Abadir, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Philip Smith Lab

    Work in the Philip Smith Lab explores several key topics within the field of sleep medicine. We investigate the role of obesity and neural control in sleep-disordered breathing as well as the impact of metabolic function on sleep apnea. We also research the ways in which HIV and its treatments impact a patient’s sleep. Our studies have included the effects of HIV and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on both sleep and daytime function as well as the relationship between systemic inflammation and sleep apnea in men with HIV.

    Research Areas: AIDS, sleep medicine, obesity, HIV, metabolic function, sleep apnea

    Principal Investigator

    Philip Smith, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Qian-Li Xue Lab

    The primary area of statistical expertise in the Qian-Li Xue Lab is the development and application of statistical methods for: (1) handling the truncation of information on underlying or unobservable outcomes (e.g., disability) as a result of screening, (2) missing data, including outcome (e.g., frailty) censoring by a competing risk (e.g., mortality) and (3) trajectory analysis of multivariate outcomes. Other areas of methodologic research interests include multivariate, latent variable models. In Women's Health and Aging Studies, we have closely collaborated with scientific investigators on the design and analysis of longitudinal data relating biomarkers of inflammation, hormonal dysregulation and micronutrient deficiencies to the development and progression of frailty and disability, as well as characterizing the natural history of change in cognitive and physical function over time.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, disabilities, longitudinal data, hormonal dysregulation, women's health, inflammation, frailty, biostatistics, gerontology, latent variables

    Principal Investigator

    Qian-Li Xue, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Rachel Damico Lab

    Work in the Rachel Damico Lab explores topics within the fields of vascular biology and pulmonary medicine, with a focus on acute lung injury and apoptosis in lung diseases. Our studies have included examining idiopathic and scleroderma-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, vascular receptor autoantibodies, and the link between inflammation and the Warburg phenomenon in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. We have also researched the inhibitory factor of macrophage migration and its governing of endothelial cell sensitivity to LPS-induced apoptosis.

    Research Areas: critical care medicine, acute lung injury, lung disease, vascular biology, apoptosis

    Principal Investigator

    Rachel Damico, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Rebecca Manno Lab

    The Rebecca Manno Lab studies the effects of rheumatic diseases, particularly inflammatory arthritis and vasculitis, on older adults’ muscles, strength and function. Other research examines the impact of resistance exercise and nutrition on muscle, strength and inflammation in patients with inflammatory arthritis and vasculitis.

    Research Areas: nutrition, rheumatology, vasculitis, exercise, arthritis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Rebecca Manno, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sandra Gabelli Lab

    The Gabelli lab research is focused on structural, mechanistic and functional aspects of enzyme activation that play a role in the biology of human diseases such as cancer, parasitic infection and cardiovascular disease. Their work seeks to:

    1. Understand how molecular events at the recognition level coordinate and trigger events in the cells
    2. Translate structural and mechanistic information on protein:protein interactions at the cytoplasmic level into preventive and therapeutic treatment for human disease.

    To achieve a comprehensive understanding, they are studying cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions involved in regulation of pathways such as PI3K and Sodium Voltage gated channels. Their research integrates structural biology and chemical biology and it is focused on drug discovery for targeted therapies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, chemical biology, cell biology, structural biology, proteomics, cancer, diarrhea, diabetes, drugs, cellular signaling, inflammation, pharmacology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Sandra Gabelli, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sean Leng Lab

    The Sean Leng Lab studies the biology of healthy aging. Specific projects focus on chronic inflammation in late-life decline; immunosenescence and its relationship to the basic biological and physiological changes related to aging and frailty in the human immune system; and T-cell repertoire analysis.

    Research Areas: immunology, aging, inflammation, gerontology, T cells

    Principal Investigator

    Sean Leng, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

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