Find a Research Lab

Enter a research interest, principal investigator or keyword

Displaying 1 to 10 of 37 results for inflammation

Show: 10 · 20 · 50

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  • Amita Gupta Lab

    The Amita Gupta Lab focuses on drug trials to prevent and treat HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and other co-morbidities in adults, including pregnant women and children who reside in low-income settings. We also conduct cohort studies assessing HIV, inflammation and nutrition in international settings; TB in pregnancy; and risk factors for TB in India (CTRIUMPH). We collaborate with several faculty in the Center for TB Research, Division of Infectious Diseases and the School of Public Health.

    Research Areas: global health, nutrition, infectious disease, HIV, inflammation, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    Amita Gupta, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Andrew Lane Lab

    The Lane laboratory is focused on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying chronic rhinosinusitis and particularly the pathogenesis of nasal polyps.  Diverse techniques in molecular biology, immunology, physiology, and engineering are utilized to study epithelial cell innate immunity, olfactory loss, the sinus microbiome, and drug delivery to the nose and sinus cavities. Ongoing work explores how epithelial cells participate in the immune response and contribute to chronic sinonasal inflammation. The lab creates and employs transgenic mouse models of chronic sinusitis to support research in this area. Collaborations are in place with the School of Public Health to explore mechanisms of anti-viral immunity in influenza and rhinovirus, and with the University of Maryland to characterize the bacterial microbiome of the nose and sinuses in health and disease.

    Research Areas: nasal polyps, olfaction, cell culture, transgenic mice, chronic rhinosinusitis, innate immunity, molecular biology

  • Ashwin Balagopal Lab

    Research in the Ashwin Balagopal Lab examines innate immunology and hepatic inflammation. Specifically, we explore microbial translocation Kupffer cells in HIV- hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, while also developing in situ liver studies of HIV-HCV pathogenesis. Previous work has focused on antiretroviral therapy, interferon sensitivity and virologic setpoint in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfected patients.

    Research Areas: antiretroviral therapies, infectious disease, AIDS, HIV, hepatitis C

    Principal Investigator

    Ashwin Balagopal, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Becker Lab

    The main focus of the Becker lab has been on the mechanisms and consequences of post-ischemic myocardial inflammation.

    Genomic control of platelet function:

    Aggregation of blood platelets initiates clotting in coronary arteries, the main cause of heart attacks. Our laboratory conducts experiments to understand how genes control platelet function. Through funding by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, we have performed candidate gene analysis, linkage studies, whole genome association studies, and now whole genome sequencing in about 2000 healthy subjects from families with early onset coronary artery disease. The subjects are siblings or offspring of an individual identified with coronary artery disease before age 60 in the GeneSTAR Research Program (Genetic Studies of Atherosclerosis Risk). We have identified a large number of common and rare genetic variants associated with platelet aggregation, and although some variants are located in genes known to be important in... the biology of platelet function, most are in non-protein coding regions of genes (introns) or in intergenic regions of the genome. To understand better how these variants influence platelet function, we created pluripotent stem cells from blood mononuclear cells in 257 genotyped GeneSTAR subjects and then transformed the stem cells to megakaryocytes, the source of platelets in the bone marrow. We have determined the entire transcriptome of these megakaryocytes to measure gene expression levels in an effort to functionally link genetic variation with platelet function. We are also interested in epigenetic effects which regulate the amount of gene transcription and resulting protein formation. We have done similar transcriptomic and proteomic studies in blood platelets as we have in stem cell-derived megakaryocytes.

    Our goal is to identify new therapeutic targets for drug development to control excessive platelet aggregation and reduce the risk of heart attack in susceptible individuals. We also hope to use the genetic information to predict who is at greatest risk for platelet aggregation or bleeding, and tailor treatment to effectively apply individualized precision medicine.

    The Becker laboratory also extends its cardiovascular work well beyond platelet function, as noted on the GeneSTAR Research Program website.
    view more

    Research Areas: post-ischemic myocardial inflammation, effects of mental stress on the heart, cardiology, genetics of premature coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Lewis Becker, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Bradley Undem Lab

    Research in the Bradley Undem Lab centers around the hypothesis that the peripheral nervous system is directly involved in the processes of inflammation. This hypothesis is being studied primarily in the central airways and sympathetic ganglia. We are addressing this in a multidisciplinary fashion, using pharmacological, electrophysiological, biochemical and anatomical methodologies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, electrophysiology, inflammation, pharmacology, nervous system

    Principal Investigator

    Bradley Undem, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research

    In conjunction with the Molecular Imaging Center, the Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research core provides state-of-the art small animal imaging equipment, including PET, SPECT, CT and US, to support the wide range of scientific projects within the diverse research community of the Johns Hopkins University and beyond. Trained technologists assist investigators in the use of these facilities.

    Research Areas: infectious disease, imaging, inflammation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Sanjay Jain, M.B.B.S., M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Center for Nanomedicine

    The Center for Nanomedicine engineers drug and gene delivery technologies that have significant implications for the prevention, treatment and cure of many major diseases facing the world today. Specifically, we are focusing on the eye, central nervous system, respiratory system, women's health, gastrointestinal system, cancer, and inflammation.

    We are a unique translational nanotechnology effort located that brings together engineers, scientists and clinicians working under one roof on translation of novel drug and gene delivery technologies

    Research Areas: central nervous system, respiratory system, nanotechnology, cancer, drugs, women's health, inflammation, eye, gastrointestinal

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Justin Hanes, Ph.D.

    Department

    Ophthalmology

  • Clifton O. Bingham III Lab

    Research in the Clifton O. Bingham III Lab focuses on defining clinical and biochemical disease phenotypes related to therapeutic responses in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; developing rational clinical trial designs to test new treatments; improving patient-reported outcome measures; evaluating novel imaging modalities for arthritis; and examining the role of oral health in inflammatory arthritis.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, imaging, osteoarthritis, clinical trials, inflammation, oral health, rheumatoid arthritis

    Principal Investigator

    Clifton O. Bingham, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Cynthia Sears Laboratory

    Work in the Cynthia Sears Laboratory focuses on the bacterial contributions to the development of human colon cancer and the impact of the microbiome on other cancers and the therapy of cancer. The current work involves mouse and human studies to define how enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pks+ Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium nucleatum, biofilms and the colonic microbiota induce chronic colonic inflammation and colon cancer. Prospective human studies of the microbiome and biofilms in screening colonoscopy are in progress as are studies to determine if and how the microbiome impacts the response of individuals with cancer to immunotherapy and other cancer therapies.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, AIDS, microbiome, colon cancer, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, chronic colonic inflammation

    Principal Investigator

    Cynthia Sears, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Devreotes Laboratory

    The Devreotes Laboratory is engaged in genetic analysis of chemotaxis in eukaryotic cells. Our long-term goal is a complete description of the network controlling chemotactic behavior. We are analyzing combinations of deficiencies to understand interactions among network components and carrying out additional genetic screens to identify new pathways involved in chemotaxis. A comprehensive understanding of this fascinating process should lead to control of pathological conditions such as inflammation and cancer metastasis.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, genomics, inflammation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Devreotes, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4