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Displaying 1 to 20 of 44 results for infectious disease

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  • Alain Labrique Lab

    The Alain Labrique Lab conducts research on infectious diseases and public health. Our team studies the various factors that lead to maternal and neonatal mortality, particularly in underserved populations in South Asia, using the tools of infectious disease epidemiology, molecular biology and biostatistics. We work to better understand factors such as the interface of micronutrient deficiency and maternal/infant mortality and the prevention of nosocomial infections through mechanistic or nutritional interventions. We also have a longstanding interest in technologies that may enable early detection of disease.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, mobile health, Hepatitis, neonatal, infectious disease, public health, biostatistics, nosocomial infections, molecular biology

  • Amita Gupta Lab

    The Amita Gupta Lab focuses on drug trials to prevent and treat HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and other co-morbidities in adults, including pregnant women and children who reside in low-income settings. We also conduct cohort studies assessing HIV, inflammation and nutrition in international settings; TB in pregnancy; and risk factors for TB in India (CTRIUMPH). We collaborate with several faculty in the Center for TB Research, Division of Infectious Diseases and the School of Public Health.

    Research Areas: global health, nutrition, infectious disease, HIV, inflammation, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    Amita Gupta, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory

    The long-term goal of the Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory is to develop novel approaches to kill human pathogens, including bacterial pathogens and malaria parasites, with the ultimate objective of developing potential therapeutic agents.

    Toward this goal, we are pursuing studies of bacterial isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes comprising the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway essential in many human pathogens. Studies focus on understanding mechanism and regulation in the pathway toward the development of selective inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Our strategies for creating new anti-infective agents involve interdisciplinary research in the continuum of organic, biological and medicinal chemistry. Molecular biology, protein expression and biochemistry, and synthetic chemistry are key tools for our research.

    Research Areas: bacterial pathogens, biochemistry, enzymes, infectious disease, protein expression, synthetic chemistry, isoprenoid biosynthesis, malaria, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

  • Carrie Herzke Lab

    The Carrie Herzke Lab focuses on patient safety and quality improvement. We’re also interested in infectious diseases, particularly infection control, and the education of resident and medical students.

    Research Areas: patient safety, quality improvement, infectious disease

    Principal Investigator

    Carrie Herzke, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research

    In conjunction with the Molecular Imaging Center, the Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research core provides state-of-the art small animal imaging equipment, including PET, SPECT, CT and US, to support the wide range of scientific projects within the diverse research community of the Johns Hopkins University and beyond. Trained technologists assist investigators in the use of these facilities.

    Research Areas: infectious disease, imaging, inflammation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Sanjay Jain, M.B.B.S., M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Charles W. Flexner Laboratory

    A. Laboratory activities include the use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) techniques to measure intracellular drugs and drugs metabolites. AMS is a highly sensitive method for detecting tracer amounts of radio-labeled molecules in cells, tissues, and body fluids. We have been able to measure intracellular zidovudine triphosphate (the active anabolite of zidovudine) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers given small doses of 14C-zidovudine, and have directly compared the sensitivity of AMS to traditional LC/MS methods carried out in our laboratory.

    B. Clinical research activities investigate the clinical pharmacology of new anti-HIV therapies and drug combinations. Specific drug classes studied include HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, entry inhibitors (selective CCR5 and CXCR4 antagonists), and integrase inhibitors. Scientific objectives of clinical studies include characterization of early drug activity, toxicity, and pharmacok...inetics. Additional objectives are characterization of pathways of drug metabolism, and identification of clinically significant harmful and beneficial drug interactions mediated by hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P450 isoforms. view more

    Research Areas: antiretroviral drugs, infectious disease, HIV protease inhibitors, HIV, drugs, accelerator mass spectrometry

    Principal Investigator

    Charles Flexner, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Christine Durand Lab

    Dr. Christine Durand, assistant professor of medicine and oncology and member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, is involved in clinical and translational research focused on individuals infected with HIV and hepatitis C virus who require cancer and transplant therapies. Her current research efforts include looking at outcomes of hepatitis C treatment after solid organ transplant, the potential use of organs from HIV-infected donors for HIV-infected solid organ transplant candidates, and HIV cure strategies including bone marrow transplantation.

    Dr. Durand is supported by multiple grants:

    • R01 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to study HIV-to-HIV organ transplantation in the US.
    • K23 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to study antiretroviral therapy during bone marrow transplant in HIV-1 infection.
    • U01 from the NIAID to study HIV-to-HIV deceased donor kidney transplantation.
    U01 from the NIAID to study HIV-to-HIV deceased ...donor liver transplantation. view more

    Research Areas: Bone Marrow Transplantation, transplants, infectious disease, AIDS, HIV, Solid Organ Transplantation, hepatitis C

    Principal Investigator

    Christine Durand, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Craig W. Hendrix Lab

    Research in the Craig W. Hendrix Lab concentrates on the chemoprevention of HIV infection, clinical pharmacology of antiviral drugs, drug interactions, and oral, topical and injectable HIV microbicide development. Our lab conducts small, intensive sampling studies of PK and PD of drugs for HIV prevention with a focus on developing methods to better understand HIV and drug distribution in the male genital tract, female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal tract. We also support numerous HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis development studies from phase I to phase III, largely as leader of the Pharmacology Core Laboratory of both the Microbicide Trial Network and HIV Prevention Trials Network.

    Research Areas: antiretroviral therapies, infectious disease, HIV, drugs

    Principal Investigator

    Craig W. Hendrix, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • David Dowdy Lab

    The David Dowdy Lab conducts research in the field of infectious disease epidemiology. We use an interdisciplinary approach that involves infectious disease modeling, health economics, classical epidemiology, and operational and implementation science. Much of our work explores the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. We also have a longstanding interest in “translational epidemiology,” with a goal of developing methods to help medical professionals who use epidemiological data make decisions that are in the best interest of patients and public health.

    Research Areas: health economics, epidemiology, infectious disease, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    David Dowdy, M.D., M.Sc., Ph.D., Sc.M.

    Department

    Medicine

  • David Sack Lab

    Research in the David Sack Lab focuses on enteric infections. Our team has worked to develop laboratory detection methods to better understand the epidemiology of these agents. We also work to create appropriate clinical management strategies, such as antibiotics and rehydration methods, for enteric infections. Our work has included participating in the development of vaccines for a range of bacterial infections, including rotavirus, cholera and enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, international health, cholera, infectious disease, diarrhea, malaria, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    David Sack, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Elizabeth Tucker Lab

    Research in the Elizabeth Tucker Lab aims to find treatments that decrease neuroinflammation and improve recovery, as well as to improve morbidity and mortality in patients with infectious neurological diseases. We are currently working with Drs. Sujatha Kannan and Sanjay Jain to study neuroinflammation related to central nervous system tuberculosis – using an animal model to examine the role of neuroinflammation in this disease and how it can differ in developing brains and adult brains. Our team also is working with Dr. Jain to study noninvasive imaging techniques for use in monitoring disease progression and evaluating treatment responses.

    Research Areas: infectious disease, imaging, neuroinflammation, morbidity, tuberculosis

  • Eric Nuermberger Lab

    Research in the Eric Nuermberger Lab focuses primarily on experimental chemotherapy for tuberculosis. We use proven murine models of active and latent tuberculosis infection to assess the effectiveness of novel antimicrobials. A key goal is to identify new agents to combine with existing drugs to shorten tuberculosis therapy or enable less frequent drug administration. We're also using a flow-controlled in vitro pharmacodynamic system to better understand the pharmacodynamics of drug efficacy and the selection of drug-resistant mutants during exposure to current agents.

    Research Areas: pharmacodynamics, chemotherapy, infectious disease, antimicrobials, drugs, antibiotics, Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumonia, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    Eric Nuermberger, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Erica Johnson Lab

    Research in the Erica Johnson Lab investigates infection control in military deployment environments as well as infections that are associated with combat trauma. We explore topics such as HIV outcomes, gender-based health issues and disparities in care.

    Research Areas: gender-based health issues, infectious disease, combat trauma, HIV, deployment infection control, health disparities

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Erica Johnson, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Graham Mooney Lab

    Work in the Graham Mooney Lab focuses on the history of public health interventions as well as the impact of public health policies on population health outcomes. Our research includes topics such as the history of public health in the United Kingdom and United States during the 19th and 20th centuries, and the historical geographies of health and medicine. We also explore infectious disease surveillance and control and historical epidemiology and demography.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, infectious disease, public health, history of medicine

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Graham Mooney, Ph.D.

    Department

    History of Medicine

  • IndoUS Clinical Research

    Our IndoUS team, based both in Baltimore and in India, specializes in international clinical research (cohort studies and clinical trials), public health implementation science and education in infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB), vaccine preventable illnesses, antimicrobial resistant infections, and more recently COVID. Since 2003, our work has been focused primarily on India, where we are engaged in several Indo-JHU and international research collaborations. We partner with several leading medical and research institutions in India (e.g. BJGMC, DY Patil, Hinduja Hospital, KEM, Bharati Vidyapeeth, NIRT, JIPMER, CMC, Medanta, IISER, YRG, IIT), as well as others in sub-Saharan Africa, US and Brazil. We are actively involved in the following consortia: 1) Indo-US Vaccine Action Program sponsored RePORT India TB research consortium, which is funded by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the government of India, Department of Biotechnology. 2) RePORT International T...B Research Consortium, a multilateral global consortia for TB research, 3) US NIH funded multi-country HIV and TB trials consortia of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) and the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Trials Network (IMPAACT) Network, 4) NIH and AmFAR funded IeDea HIV/TB Working Group and the Treat Asia-IeDEA HIV and TB epidemiology databases, and 5) CDC SHEPHERD AMR studies.

    Our group has been awarded research grants from the US NIH, US CDC, UNITAID, Indian government, and several philanthropic foundations to investigate infectious diseases of importance to India and beyond.
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    Research Areas: international health, infectious disease, antimicrobial resistance, HIV, COVID in adults including pregnant women and children, tuberculosis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Amita Gupta, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Joel Blankson Lab

    Work in the Joel Blankson Lab explores the mechanism of control of HIV-1 replication in a cohort of patients known as elite controllers or elite suppressors. These patients are HIV-1 seropositive but maintain levels of viremia that are below the limit of detection of standard clinical assays. We feel that elite suppressors represent a potential model for a therapeutic HIV vaccine. Our central hypothesis is that many of these patients are infected with fully replication-competent HIV-1 isolates that are held in check by the immune system. To test this hypothesis, we are studying many different host and viral factors in these patients.

    Research Areas: vaccines, infectious disease, HIV, pathogenesis, elite suppressors

    Principal Investigator

    Joel Blankson, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jonathan Golub Lab

    Research in the Jonathan Golub Lab focuses primarily on the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB), specifically in patients infected with HIV. We work with the CDC to explore potential delays in TB diagnoses as well as the risk factors that contribute to death from TB in the United States. Our research also includes ongoing studies of HIV and TB patients in Brazil and South Africa.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, infectious disease, AIDS, HIV, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Golub, M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Joseph Cofrancesco Jr. Lab

    Research in the Joseph Cofrancesco Jr. Lab focuses primarily on health care for HIV-positive patients. Our recent studies have explored topics such as HIV antiretroviral treatments, HIV resistance and the long-term complications of HIV treatment. In addition, we are part of the U.S. Fat Redistribution and Metabolism (FRAM) study and have had a long-standing involvement in projects that examine metabolic and fat complications in Thailand.

    Research Areas: antiretroviral therapies, infectious disease, AIDS, disease resistance, metabolism, HIV

    Principal Investigator

    Joseph Cofrancesco, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Justin Bailey Lab

    Research in the Justin Bailey Lab explores immune responses against hepatitis C virus (HCV), particularly neutralizing antibody responses, with the goal of guiding vaccine development against the virus. Recent studies have demonstrated that early and broad neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses against HCV are associated with HCV clearance, suggesting a key role for nAb in limiting HCV replication. The findings of this research will enhance understanding of how HIV infection may contribute to the lower rate of HCV clearance in HCV/HIV coinfected individuals, and the results could have implications for persistence of other viruses commonly occurring as coinfections with HIV.

    Research Areas: humoral immune response, vaccines, infectious disease, AIDS, HIV, hepatitis C

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Justin Bailey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

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