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Displaying 31 to 40 of 43 results for infectious disease

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  • Photini Sinnis Lab

    Research in the Photini Sinnis Lab explores the fundamental biology of the pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria. Our team is focused on the sporozoite stage of Plasmodium, which is the infective stage of the malaria parasite, and the liver stages into which they develop. We use classic biochemistry, mutational analysis, and in vitro and in vivo assays to better understand the molecular interactions between the parasite and its mosquito and mammalian hosts. Our goal is to translate our findings to help develop treatments and a vaccine that target the malaria parasite.

    Research Areas: microbiology, biochemistry, infectious disease, parasites, malaria

    Principal Investigator

    Photini Sinnis, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Randall Packard Lab

    The Randall Packard Lab investigates topics in the field of the history of medicine. Our current work seeks to explore the global history of dengue fever. Research is focused on the emergence and global spread of dengue as well as efforts to understand and control the disease. Part of our research involves establishing a better understanding of the complex biological, economic, environmental and social conditions that enabled the disease to rapidly expand worldwide during the 20th century.

    Research Areas: dengue fever, Africa, infectious disease, public health, history of medicine

    Principal Investigator

    Randall Packard, Ph.D.

    Department

    History of Medicine

  • Raymond Reid Lab

    Research in the Raymond Reid Lab focuses on community health and pediatric infectious diseases among Native American populations; epidemiologic studies of enteric infections, Haemophilus influenzae, and pneumococcus; and field testing of vaccines and treatments.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, community health, vaccines, infectious disease, enteric infections

    Principal Investigator

    Raymond Reid, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Richard Chaisson Lab

    Research in the Richard Chaisson Lab primarily examines tuberculosis and HIV infection, with specific focus on global epidemiology, clinical trials, diagnostics and public health interventions. Our recent research has involved evaluating a molecular diagnostic test for tuberculosis in HIV patients; observing TB responses during treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis; and examining antiretroviral therapy adherence, virologic and immunologic outcomes in adolescents compared with adults in Southern Africa.

    Research Areas: global health, epidemiology, infectious disease, AIDS, HIV, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    Richard Chaisson, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Robert Bollinger Lab

    The key research interests in the Robert Bollinger Lab include identifying biological and behavioral risk factors for HIV transmission as well as characterizing the clinical progression and treatment of HIV and related infectious diseases. We also have a long-standing interest in optimizing health care capacity and delivery in settings with limited resources. Our work includes implementing science research projects to explore the effectiveness of initiatives such as task-shifting, clinical education, distance learning and mobile health programs as a way to improve health care in these locations.

    Research Areas: mobile health, international health, infectious disease, HIV, public health, point-of-care diagnostics, tropical medicine, tuberculosis, health care capacity

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Bollinger, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Robert Gilman Lab

    Research in the Robert Gilman Lab focuses on disease control. Our work led to the development of microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility (MODS), a rapid tuberculosis diagnostic technique. We continue to conduct infectious disease research based at Peru’s Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia.

    Research Areas: international health, infectious disease, infections, infection control, parasitic diseases, disease control

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Gilman, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Schneck Lab

    Effective immune responses are critical for control of a variety of infectious disease including bacterial, viral and protozoan infections as well as in protection from development of tumors. Central to the development of an effective immune response is the T lymphocyte which, as part of the adaptive immune system, is central in achieving sterilization and long lasting immunity. While the normal immune responses is tightly regulated there are also notable defects leading to pathologic diseases. Inactivity of tumor antigen-specific T cells, either by suppression or passive ignorance allows tumors to grow and eventually actively suppress the immune response. Conversely, hyperactivation of antigen-specific T cells to self antigens is the underlying basis for many autoimmune diseases including: multiple sclerosis; arthritis; and diabetes. Secondary to their central role in a wide variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic responses my lab takes a broad-based approach to studying T cell re...sponses. view more

    Research Areas: t-cell responses, pathologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, pathology, immune system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Soloski Lab

    The Soloski Lab works to understand how infection can lead to the development of chronic immune-mediated diseases. Our lab studies the role of cellular immune response in controlling infection with gram-negative bacterial pathogens, such as Salmonella typhimurium. Our work has recently focused on the role of the intestinal mucosal immune compartment in controlling oral infection. This effort has identified a new unrecognized subset of T cells residing within the epithelial barrier that expands following infection. Current efforts concentrate on understanding the recognition properties and effector function of this T cell subset and determining if an analogous population exists in the human mucosa. We also strive to understand the human host immune response to infection with Borrelia burgdorfer, the causative agent of Lyme disease.

    Research Areas: bacterial pathogens, immunology, rheumatology, infectious disease, Lyme disease, autoimmune diseases, Salmonella, T cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Soloski, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Tamara O'Connor Lab

    The O'Connor Lab studies the molecular basis of infectious disease using Legionella pneumophila pathogenesis as a model system.

    We are looking at the network of molecular interactions acting at the host-pathogen interface. Specifically, we use L. pneumophila pathogenesis to examine the numerous mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen can establish infection, how it exploits host cell machinery to accomplish this, and how individual proteins and their component pathways coordinately contribute to disease.

    We are also studying the role of environmental hosts in the evolution of human pathogens. Using genetics and functional genomics, we compare and contrast the repertoires of virulence proteins required for growth in a broad assortment of hosts, how the network of molecular interactions differs between hosts, and the mechanisms by which L. pneumophila copes with this variation.

    Research Areas: infectious disease, Legionella pneumophila, genomics, pathogenesis, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Tamara O'Connor, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • The Transplant and Oncology Infectious Diseases (TOID) Center

    The mission of the Transplant and Oncology Infectious Diseases (TOID) Center is to expand institutional expertise in clinical and academic activities focused on infectious complications in transplant (solid organ and stem cell) and oncology patients at Johns Hopkins medical institutions. Key efforts include developing standardized algorithms for the prevention and treatment of infections in these vulnerable patients and to establish an expanded infrastructure to facilitate clinical and translational studies at TOID. Current research projects focus on diagnostics for invasive fungal infections and specialized studies of the pathogenesis of candidiasis and aspergillosis.

    Research Areas: transplants, candidiasis, fungal infections, infectious disease, cancer, aspergillosis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Kieren Marr, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

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