Find a Research Lab

Enter a research interest, principal investigator or keyword

Displaying 11 to 20 of 35 results for infections

Show: 10 · 20 · 50

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  • Erica Johnson Lab

    Research in the Erica Johnson Lab investigates infection control in military deployment environments as well as infections that are associated with combat trauma. We explore topics such as HIV outcomes, gender-based health issues and disparities in care.

    Research Areas: gender-based health issues, infectious disease, combat trauma, HIV, deployment infection control, health disparities

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Erica Johnson, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ernesto Freire Laboratory

    The Ernesto Freire Lab studies the use of novel drugs to treat disease. Our research has resulted in the development of a thermodynamic platform for drug discovery and optimization. Our aim is to achieve high binding affinity and selectivity as well as appropriate pharmacokinetics with the platform. We are currently focusing on drug targets such as HIV/-1 protease inhibitors (HIV/AIDS), plasmepsin inhibitors (malaria), HCV protease inhibitors (hepatitis C), coronavirus 3CL-pro protease inhibitors (SARS and other viral infections), HIV-1 gp120 inhibitors (HIV/AIDS), chymase inhibitors (cardiovascular disease) and beta lactamase inhibitors (antibiotic resistance).

    Research Areas: pharmaceuticals, thermodynamics, AIDS, drug discovery, HIV, protease inhibitors, malaria

  • Grant (Xuguang) Tao Lab

    Research in the Grant (Xuguang) Tao Lab explores environmental and occupational epidemiology topics, including workers' compensation and injuries, and nosocomial infections. We conduct research through clinical trials and systematic literature reviews, and also use cancer registry data and GIS applications in environmental epidemiological research. Our recent studies have explored topics such as the effectiveness of lumbar epidural steroid injections following lumbar surgery, the effect of physician-dispensed medication on workers' compensation claim outcomes and how the use of opioid and psychotropic medications for workers' compensation claims impacts lost work time.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, drug safety, cancer, nosocomial infections, GIS applications

    Principal Investigator

    Grant Tao, M.D., M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Gregory Kirk Lab

    Research in the Gregory Kirk Lab examines the natural history of viral infections — particularly HIV and hepatitis viruses — in the U.S. and globally. As part of the ALIVE (AIDS Linked to the Intravenous Experience) study, our research looks at a range of pathogenetic, clinical behavioral issues, with a special focus on non-AIDS-related outcomes of HIV, including cancer and liver and lung diseases. We use imaging and clinical, genetic, epigenetic and proteomic methods to identify and learn more about people at greatest risk for clinically relevant outcomes from HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections. Our long-term goal is to translate our findings into targeted interventions that help reduce the disease burden of these infections.

    Research Areas: global health, Hepatitis, Africa, AIDS, cancer, HIV, drugs, liver diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Gregory Kirk, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Haughey Lab: Neurodegenerative and Neuroinfectious Disease

    Dr. Haughey directs a disease-oriented research program that address questions in basic neurobiology, and clinical neurology. The primary research interests of the laboratory are:

    1. To identify biomarkers markers for neurodegenerative diseases including HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders, Multiple Sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. In these studies, blood and cerebral spinal fluid samples obtained from ongoing clinical studies are analyzed for metabolic profiles through a variety of biochemical, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic techniques. These biomarkers can then be used in the diagnosis of disease, as prognostic indicators to predict disease trajectory, or as surrogate markers to track the effectiveness of disease modifying interventions.
    2. To better understand how the lipid components of neuronal, and glial membranes interact with proteins to regulate signal transduction associated with differentiation, motility, inflammatory signaling, survival, and neuronal excitab...ility.
    3. To understand how extracellular vesicles (exosomes) released from brain resident cells regulate neuronal excitability, neural network activity, and peripheral immune responses to central nervous system damage and infections.
    4. To develop small molecule therapeutics that regulate lipid metabolism as a neuroprotective and restorative strategy for neurodegenerative conditions.
    view less

    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis, PTSD, HAND, HIV

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Norman Haughey, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology
    Neurosurgery

  • J. Marie Hardwick Laboratory

    Our research is focused on understanding the basic mechanisms of programmed cell death in disease pathogenesis. Billions of cells die per day in the human body. Like cell division and differentiation, cell death is also critical for normal development and maintenance of healthy tissues. Apoptosis and other forms of cell death are required for trimming excess, expired and damaged cells. Therefore, many genetically programmed cell suicide pathways have evolved to promote long-term survival of species from yeast to humans. Defective cell death programs cause disease states. Insufficient cell death underlies human cancer and autoimmune disease, while excessive cell death underlies human neurological disorders and aging. Of particular interest to our group are the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 family proteins and other factors regulate programmed cell death, particularly in the nervous system, in cancer and in virus infections. Interestingly, cell death regulators also regulate many other cel...lular processes prior to a death stimulus, including neuronal activity, mitochondrial dynamics and energetics. We study these unknown mechanisms.

    We have reported that many insults can trigger cells to activate a cellular death pathway (Nature, 361:739-742, 1993), that several viruses encode proteins to block attempted cell suicide (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 94: 690-694, 1997), that cellular anti-death genes can alter the pathogenesis of virus infections (Nature Med. 5:832-835, 1999) and of genetic diseases (PNAS. 97:13312-7, 2000) reflective of many human disorders. We have shown that anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins can be converted into killer molecules (Science 278:1966-8, 1997), that Bcl-2 family proteins interact with regulators of caspases and regulators of cell cycle check point activation (Molecular Cell 6:31-40, 2000). In addition, Bcl-2 family proteins have normal physiological roles in regulating mitochondrial fission/fusion and mitochondrial energetics to facilitate neuronal activity in healthy brains.
    view less

    Research Areas: cell death

  • Jonathan Zenilman Lab

    The Jonathan Zenilman lab conducts research related to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). We are working to develop biological markers for sexual behavior to use in other research. The lab studies sexual risk behaviors in highly vulnerable populations and studies datasets from the Baltimore City Health Department to understand STD trends and behaviors. Additionally, we study nosocomial infections at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, with a focus on developing an antimicrobial control program. We also conduct clinical research related to the natural history and microbiology of chronic wounds in the outpatient setting.

    Research Areas: behavioral research, biomarkers, sexually transmitted diseases, nosocomial infections

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Zenilman, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kenrad Nelson Lab

    Research in the Kenrad Nelson Lab focuses on diseases such as hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, leprosy, nosocomial infections, tuberculosis and infections in drug users. We study populations including HIV/AIDS patients, injection drug users, blood donors and transfusion recipients in the United States as well as in China, Thailand, Bangladesh and the Republic of Georgia. We are currently investigating the connection between HIV infection and drug use as part of the ALIVE study.

    Research Areas: Hepatitis, AIDS, blood donors, HIV, drug users, leprosy, tuberculosis, nosocomial infections

    Principal Investigator

    Kenrad Nelson, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Lisa Maragakis Lab

    Researchers in the Lisa Maragakis Lab are interested in health care-acquired infections and antimicrobial-resistant Gram-negative bacilli. We are particularly interested in the epidemiology, prevention and management of these infections.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, infections, health care-acquired infections, resistant organisms

    Principal Investigator

    Lisa Maragakis, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Mark Jennings Lab

    The Mark Jennings Lab conducts research on bacterial infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We are currently conducting a clinical trial to investigate the epidemiology and treatment of small-colony variant staphylococcus aureus in cystic fibrosis. We’ve also recently studied eradication strategies for persistent methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Research Areas: infections, cystic fibrosis

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Jennings, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4