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Displaying 31 to 36 of 36 results for immunology

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  • Sean T. Prigge Lab

    Current research in the Sean T. Prigge Lab explores the biochemical pathways found in the apicoplast, an essential organelle found in malaria parasites, using a combination of cell biology and genetic, biophysical and biochemical techniques. We are particularly focused on the pathways used for the biosynthesis and modification of fatty acids and associated enzyme cofactors, including pantothenate, lipoic acid, biotin and iron-sulfur clusters. We want to better understand how the cofactors are acquired and used, and whether they are essential for the growth of blood-stage malaria parasites.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, enzymes, immunology, apicoplasts, malaria, molecular microbiology

  • Soloski Lab

    The Soloski Lab works to understand how infection can lead to the development of chronic immune-mediated diseases. Our lab studies the role of cellular immune response in controlling infection with gram-negative bacterial pathogens, such as Salmonella typhimurium. Our work has recently focused on the role of the intestinal mucosal immune compartment in controlling oral infection. This effort has identified a new unrecognized subset of T cells residing within the epithelial barrier that expands following infection. Current efforts concentrate on understanding the recognition properties and effector function of this T cell subset and determining if an analogous population exists in the human mucosa. We also strive to understand the human host immune response to infection with Borrelia burgdorfer, the causative agent of Lyme disease.

    Research Areas: bacterial pathogens, immunology, rheumatology, infectious disease, Lyme disease, autoimmune diseases, Salmonella, T cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Soloski, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Stuart C. Ray Lab

    Chronic viral hepatitis (due to HBV and HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide, and an increasing cause of death in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Our laboratory studies are aimed at better defining the host-pathogen interactions in these infections, with particular focus on humoral and cellular immune responses, viral evasion, inflammation, fibrosis progression, and drug resistance. We are engaged in synthetic biology approaches to rational vaccine development and understanding the limits on the extraordinary genetic variability of HCV.

    Research Areas: immunology, Hepatitis, AIDS, HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, liver diseases, synthetic biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Stuart Ray, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Suzanne Topalian Lab

    Our lab currently focuses on three areas of immunotherapy research: gaining a deeper knowledge of the biological underpinnings of human autoimmune response; discovering biomarkers that will help us identify which patients and tumor types are most likely to respond to various immune therapies; and developing immune-based treatment combinations that could deliver a more powerful anti-tumor response than monotherapies.

    Research Areas: cancer, PD-1, melanoma, immunotherapy, cancer immunology

    Principal Investigator

    Suzanne Topalian, M.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • The Cihakova Lab

    The Cihakova research laboratory is an immunology laboratory dedicated to the investigation of autoimmune diseases. Our most active research is focused on myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. We expanded our interest in inflammatory heart diseases to include the study of immune mechanisms driving pericarditis and myocardial infarction. In addition, we are interested in the pathogenesis of a broad range of autoimmune diseases such as, Sjogren's syndrome, congenital complete heart block, and APECED (autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy). Through several collaborative projects we also investigate rheumatoid arthritis and the immune components of schizophrenia.

    Research Areas: schizophrenia, autoimmune diseases, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Daniela Cihakova, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • The Laboratory for Precision Immunology

    We are devoted to developing and deploying cutting edge technologies that can be used to define human immune responses. Much of our work leverages ‘next generation’ DNA sequencing, which enables massively parallel molecular measurements. Examples of our technologies include:
    - bacteriophage display of synthetic peptidome libraries for comprehensive, quantitative profiling of antibodies;
    - display of ORFeome libraries for antigen discovery, protein-protein interaction studies, and drug target identification;
    - ultrasensitive, multiplex RNA quantification techniques to monitor gene expression and detect microbes;
    - pooled genetic screening to elucidate immune cell function and identify new therapeutic targets.

    The Larman Laboratory uses these and other approaches to identify opportunities for monitoring and manipulating immune responses.

    Research Areas: immunology, precision immunology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    H. Larman, Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

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