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Displaying 21 to 30 of 63 results for imaging

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  • Hey-Kyoung Lee Lab

    The Hey-Kyoung Lee Lab is interested in exploring the cellular and molecular changes that happen at synapses to allow memory storage. We use various techniques, including electrophysiological recording, biochemical and molecular analysis, and imaging, to understand the cellular and molecular changes that happen during synaptic plasticity.

    Currently, we are examining the molecular and cellular mechanisms of global homeostatic synaptic plasticity using sensory cortices as model systems. In particular, we found that loss of vision elicits global changes in excitatory synaptic transmission in the primary visual cortex. Vision loss also triggers specific synaptic changes in other primary sensory cortices, which we postulate underlies sensory compensation in the blind. One of our main research goals is to understand the mechanisms underlying such cross-modal synaptic plasticity.

    We are also interested in elucidating the events that occur in diseased brains. In collaboration with othe...r researchers, we are analyzing various mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, especially focusing on the possible alterations in synaptic plasticity mechanisms.
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    Research Areas: biochemistry, synaptic plasticity, memory, imaging, vision, molecular biology, Alzheimer's disease

    Principal Investigator

    Hey-Kyoung Lee, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Huang Laboratory

    Our lab is interested in understanding the fundamental mechanisms of how cells move and implications in disease treatment. We use an interdisciplinary approach involving fluorescent live cell imaging, genetics, and computer modeling to study the systems level properties of the biochemical networks that drive cell migration.

    Research Areas: pathology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Chuan-Hsiang Huang, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Imaging for Surgery, Therapy and Radiology (I-STAR) Lab

    The Imaging for Surgery, Therapy and Radiology (I-STAR) Lab is a collaborative research endeavor based in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Research areas include: (1) Imaging physics: Mathematical models of imaging performance in advanced modalities, including cone-beam CT and spectral/dual-energy imaging, (2) 3-D image reconstruction: Advanced 3-D image reconstruction based on statistical models of the imaging chain and prior information, (3) Novel imaging systems: Preclinical prototypes translated from the laboratory to first application in diagnostic and interventional procedures, and(4) Image-guided interventions and diagnostic radiology: High-precision interventional guidance systems (for surgery, interventional radiology, and radiation therapy) and new technologies for high-quality diagnostic imaging.

    Research Areas: 3-D, physics, imaging, radiology, surgery, CT

  • Inoue Lab

    Complexity in signaling networks is often derived from co-opting one set of molecules for multiple operations. Understanding how cells achieve such sophisticated processing using a finite set of molecules within a confined space--what we call the "signaling paradox"--is critical to biology and engineering as well as the emerging field of synthetic biology.

    In the Inoue Lab, we have recently developed a series of chemical-molecular tools that allow for inducible, quick-onset and specific perturbation of various signaling molecules. Using this novel technique in conjunction with fluorescence imaging, microfabricated devices, quantitative analysis and computational modeling, we are dissecting intricate signaling networks.

    In particular, we investigate positive-feedback mechanisms underlying the initiation of neutrophil chemotaxis (known as symmetry breaking), as well as spatio-temporally compartmentalized signaling of Ras and membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides. In parallel,... we also try to understand how cell morphology affects biochemical pathways inside cells. Ultimately, we will generate completely orthogonal machinery in cells to achieve existing, as well as novel, cellular functions. Our synthetic, multidisciplinary approach will elucidate the signaling paradox created by nature. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, signaling paradox, signaling networks, molecular biology, synthetic biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Takanari Inoue, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • In-vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center

    The In-vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center conducts multidisciplinary research on cellular and molecular imaging related to cancer. We provide resources, such as consultation on biostatistics and bioinformatics and optical imaging and probe development, to understand and effectively treat cancer. Our molecular oncology experts consult on preclinical studies, use of human tissues, interpretation of data and molecular characterization of cells and tumor tissue.

    Research Areas: optical imaging, molecular characterization of tumor tissue, bioinformatics, molecular oncology, biostatistics, probe development, molecular characterization of cells, cancer imaging

  • J. Webster Stayman Lab

    The J. Webster Stayman Lab studies both emission tomography and transmission tomography (CT, tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT). Our research activities relate to 3-D reconstruction, including model-based statistical / iterative reconstruction, regularization methods and modeling of imaging systems. We are developing a generalized framework for penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction combining statistical models of noise and image formation with incorporation of prior information, including patient-specific prior images, atlases and models of components / devices known to be in the field of view. Our research includes algorithm development and physical experimentation for imaging system design and optimization.

    Research Areas: 3-D, imaging, emission tomography, transmission tomography, radiology, computed tomography

  • James Pekar Lab

    How do we see, hear, and think? More specifically, how can we study living people to understand how the brain sees, hears, and thinks? Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a powerful anatomical imaging technique widely used for clinical diagnosis, was further developed into a tool for probing brain function. By sensitizing magnetic resonance images to the changes in blood oxygenation that occur when regions of the brain are highly active, we can make "movies" that reveal the brain at work. Dr. Pekar works on the development and application of this MRI technology.

    Dr. Pekar is a biophysicist who uses a variety of magnetic resonance techniques to study brain physiology and function. Dr. Pekar serves as Manager of the F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, a research resource where imaging scientists and neuroscientists collaborate to study brain function using unique state-of-the-art techniques in a safe comfortable environment, to further develop such techni...ques, and to provide training and education. Dr. Pekar works with center staff to serve the center's users and to keep the center on the leading edge of technology.
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    Research Areas: magnetic resonance, functional magnetic resonance imaging, radiology

  • Janet Record Lab

    Research in the Janet Record Lab focuses on medical education and patient-centered care. We’re currently developing a curriculum for internal medicine residents in the inpatient general medicine service setting. The curriculum teaches residents to use hand-carried ultrasound for imaging the inferior vena cava to assess volume status.

    Research Areas: medical education, patient-centered health care, imaging, internal medicine, inferior vena cava

    Principal Investigator

    Janet Record, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jeff Bulte Lab

    The clinical development of novel immune and stem cell therapies calls for suitable methods that can follow the fate of cells non-invasively in humans at high resolution. The Bulte Lab has pioneered methods to label cells magnetically (using tiny superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles) in order to make them visible by MR imaging.

    While the lab is doing basic bench-type research, there is a strong interaction with the clinical interventional radiology and oncology groups in order to bring the methodologies into the clinic.

    Research Areas: immunology, stem cells, cancer, MRI, interventional radiology

  • Jinyuan Zhou Lab

    Dr. Zhou's research focuses on developing new in vivo MRI and MRS methodologies to study brain function and disease. His most recent work includes absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow, quantification of functional MRI, high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer mechanism, development of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) technology, brain pH MR imaging, and tissue protein MR imaging. Notably, Dr. Zhou and his colleagues invented the amide proton transfer (APT) approach for brain pH imaging and tumor protein imaging. His initial paper on brain pH imaging was published in Nature Medicine in 2003 and his most recent paper on tumor treatment effects was published in Nature Medicine in 2011. A major part of his current research is the pre-clinical and clinical imaging of brain tumors, strokes, and other neurologic disorders using the APT and other novel MRI techniques. The overall goal is to achieve the MRI contrast at the protein and peptide ...level without injection of exogenous agents and improve the diagnostic capability of MRI and the patient outcomes. view more

    Research Areas: magnetic resonance, functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain, stroke

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