Find a Research Lab

Enter a research interest, principal investigator or keyword

Displaying 1 to 4 of 4 results for imaging systems

Show: 10 · 20 · 50

  1. 1
  • Health Technologies

    The APL Health Technologies program's functional restoration focus area includes two portfolios with particular relevance in neurology. The first focuses on motor restoration, using teams with expertise in robotics, microsensors, haptics, artificial intelligence and brain-machine interfaces. One set of projects, currently sponsored by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Henry Jackson Foundation, centers on a bionic arm technology that integrates with bone and muscle in amputee patients, restoring a variety of normal functions to the patient like cooking, folding clothing, hand shaking, and hand gestures. This portfolio explores direct brain control of the bionic limb, through work led by Dr. Nathan Crone of Johns Hopkins Neurology and Dr. Pablo Celnik of Johns Hopkins Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Another set of related work aims to restore motor function by better understanding and using brain signals through brain-machine interfaces. This work is current...ly funded by the National Science Foundation and industry partners. Also in the functional restoration focus area is the vision restoration portfolio. In a partnership with Second Sight and the Mann Fund, the work aims to enhance function of a bionic eye, which couples a retinal implant with a computer vision system to restore vision in blind individuals with retinitis pigmentosa. Current work in the human-machine teaming focus area includes a portfolio that is building artificial intelligence systems that improve radiologic and ophthalmic diagnostics. Another portfolio, currently focused in the surgical setting, enhances the physician's ability to visualize and manipulate the physical world, such as with orthopaedic surgery. view more

    Research Areas: robotics, imaging systems, machine learning, data fusion, artificial intelligence

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Adam Cohen, M.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • Imaging for Surgery, Therapy and Radiology (I-STAR) Lab

    The Imaging for Surgery, Therapy and Radiology (I-STAR) Lab is a collaborative research endeavor based in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Research areas include: (1) Imaging physics: Mathematical models of imaging performance in advanced modalities, including cone-beam CT and spectral/dual-energy imaging, (2) 3-D image reconstruction: Advanced 3-D image reconstruction based on statistical models of the imaging chain and prior information, (3) Novel imaging systems: Preclinical prototypes translated from the laboratory to first application in diagnostic and interventional procedures, and(4) Image-guided interventions and diagnostic radiology: High-precision interventional guidance systems (for surgery, interventional radiology, and radiation therapy) and new technologies for high-quality diagnostic imaging.

    Research Areas: 3-D, physics, imaging, radiology, surgery, CT

  • J. Webster Stayman Lab

    The J. Webster Stayman Lab studies both emission tomography and transmission tomography (CT, tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT). Our research activities relate to 3-D reconstruction, including model-based statistical / iterative reconstruction, regularization methods and modeling of imaging systems. We are developing a generalized framework for penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction combining statistical models of noise and image formation with incorporation of prior information, including patient-specific prior images, atlases and models of components / devices known to be in the field of view. Our research includes algorithm development and physical experimentation for imaging system design and optimization.

    Research Areas: 3-D, imaging, emission tomography, transmission tomography, radiology, computed tomography

  • Martin G. Pomper Lab

    Recent advances in molecular and cellular biology, the emergence of more sophisticated animal models of human disease and the development of sensitive, high-resolution imaging systems enable the study of pathophysiology noninvasively in unprecedented detail. The overall goal of our work is to develop new techniques and agents to study human disease through imaging. We concentrate on two areas, i.e., cancer and central nervous system processes. Our work extends from basic chemical and radiochemical synthesis to clinical translation.

    Research Areas: imaging, cancer

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Martin Pomper, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Radiology

  1. 1