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Displaying 1 to 10 of 13 results for homeostasis

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  • Anderson Lab

    Research in the Anderson laboratory focuses on cellular signaling and ionic mechanisms that cause heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, major public health problems worldwide. Primary focus is on the multifunctional Ca2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). The laboratory identified CaMKII as an important pro-arrhythmic and pro-cardiomyopathic signal, and its studies have provided proof of concept evidence motivating active efforts in biotech and the pharmaceutical industry to develop therapeutic CaMKII inhibitory drugs to treat heart failure and arrhythmias.

    Under physiological conditions, CaMKII is important for excitation-contraction coupling and fight or flight increases in heart rate. However, myocardial CaMKII is excessively activated during disease conditions where it contributes to loss of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, membrane hyperexcitability, premature cell death, and hypertrophic and inflammatory transcription. These downstream targets a...ppear to contribute coordinately and decisively to heart failure and arrhythmias. Recently, researchers developed evidence that CaMKII also participates in asthma.

    Efforts at the laboratory, funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, are highly collaborative and involve undergraduate assistants, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty. Key areas of focus are:
    • Ion channel biology and arrhythmias
    • Cardiac pacemaker physiology and disease
    • Molecular physiology of CaMKII
    • Myocardial and mitochondrial metabolism
    • CaMKII and reactive oxygen species in asthma

    Mark Anderson, MD, is the William Osler Professor of Medicine, the director of the Department of Medicine in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and physician-in-chief of The Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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    Research Areas: heart failure, arrhythmia, cardiovascular diseases, sudden cardiac death

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Anderson, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Dwight Bergles Laboratory

    The Bergles Laboratory studies synaptic physiology, with an emphasis on glutamate transporters and glial involvement in neuronal signaling. We are interested in understanding the mechanisms by which neurons and glial cells interact to support normal communication in the nervous system. The lab studies glutamate transport physiology and function. Because glutamate transporters play a critical role in glutamate homeostasis, understanding the transporters' function is relevant to numerous neurological ailments, including stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Other research in the laboratory focuses on signaling between neurons and glial cells at synapses. Understanding how neurons and cells communicate, may lead to new approaches for stimulating re-myelination following injury or disease. Additional research in the lab examines how a unique form of glia-to-neuron signaling in the cochlea influences auditory system development, whethe...r defects in cell communication lead to certain hereditary forms of hearing impairment, and if similar mechanisms are related to sound-induced tinnitus. view more

    Research Areas: epilepsy, synaptic physiology, ALS, stroke, neuronal signaling, glutamate transport physiology and function, audiology, neuroscience, neurology, nervous system, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Dwight Bergles, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Enid Neptune Lab

    Work in the Enid Neptune Lab focuses on topics within the fields of pulmonary and critical care medicine. Our research centers primarily on therapeutic strategies for Marfan syndrome and hepatocyte growth factor signaling in airspace homeostasis. We also conduct research on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with a focus on its mechanisms and potential methods for preventing its progression. Our research within critical care has most recently involved investigating superoxide dismutase 3 dysregulation in neonatal lung injuries.

    Research Areas: critical care medicine, pulmonary medicine, COPD, Marfan syndrome

    Principal Investigator

    Enid Neptune, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Espenshade Lab

    The Espenshade Lab uses a multi-organismal and multidisciplinary approach to understand how eukaryotic cells measure insoluble lipids and dissolved gases. We have chosen cholesterol and oxygen as our model molecules, based on their essential roles in cell function and the importance of their proper homeostasis for human health.

    Research Areas: cell biology, oxygen, eukaryotic cells, cholesterol

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Espenshade, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Gregg Semenza Lab

    The Gregg Semenza Lab studies the molecular mechanisms of oxygen homeostasis. We have cloned and characterized hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor.

    Current research investigates the role of HIF-1 in the pathophysiology of cancer, cerebral and myocardial ischemia, and chronic lung disease, which are the most common causes of mortality in the U.S.

    Research Areas: cancer, oxygen, lung disease, genomics, HIF-1, pathogenesis, myocardial ischemia

    Principal Investigator

    Gregg Semenza, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pediatrics

  • Guang William Wong Lab

    The Wong Lab seeks to understand mechanisms employed by cells and tissues to maintain metabolic homeostasis. We are currently addressing how adipose- and skeletal muscle-derived hormones (adipokines and myokines), discovered in our lab, regulate tissue crosstalk and signaling pathways to control energy metabolism. We use transgenic and knockout mouse models, as well as cell culture systems, to address the role of the CTRP family of hormones in physiological and disease states. We also aim to identify the receptors that mediate the biological functions of CTRPs.

    Research Areas: energy metabolism, insulin resistance, hormones, diabetes, metabolic homeostasis

    Principal Investigator

    Guang Wong, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Herschel Wade Lab

    The emergence of structural genomics, proteomics and the large-scale sequencing of many genomes provides experimental access to regions of protein sequence-structure-function landscapes which have not been explored through traditional biochemical methods. Protein structure-function relationships can now be examined rigorously through the characterization of protein ensembles, which display structurally convergent--divergent solutions to analogous or very similar functional properties.

    In this modern biochemical context, the Herschel Wade Lab will use protein libraries, chemistry, biophysics, molecular biology and structural methods to examine the basis of molecular recognition in the context of several important biological problems, including structural and mechanistic aspects of multi-drug resistance, ligand-dependent molecular switches and metal ion homeostasis.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, genomics, drugs, molecular biology

  • Laboratory of Airway Immunity

    We are interested in understanding how innate immune responses regulate lung health. Innate immunity involves ancient, and well-conserved mediators and their actions regulate the balance between homeostasis and pathogenesis. In the lungs, innate immunity play a critical role in response to environmental exposures such as allergen and ambient particulate matter. My lab focuses on how these exposures can promote aberrant mucosal responses that can drive the development of diseases like asthma.

    Research Areas: allergy, type 2 immunity, asthma, particulate matter, allergens, innate immunity

  • Landon King Lab

    The Landon King Lab studies aquaporins water-specific membrane channel proteins. We hope to understand how these proteins contribute to water homeostasis in the respiratory tract and how their expression or function may be altered in disease states.

    Research Areas: respiratory system, proteomics, aquaporins

    Principal Investigator

    Landon King, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Pablo Iglesias Lab

    Investigators in the Pablo Iglesias Lab use analytic tools from control systems and dynamical systems to study cell biology, including biological signal transduction pathways. Our research interests include the ways cells interpret directional cues to guide their motion, regulatory mechanisms that control cell division, and the sensing and actuation that enable cells to maintain lipid homeostasis.

    Research Areas: homeostasis, cytokinesis, cell biology, chemotaxis, cell division

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Pablo Iglesias, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

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