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Displaying 41 to 50 of 70 results for genomics

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  • Mohamed Farah Lab

    The Mohamed Farah Lab studies axonal regeneration in the peripheral nervous system. We've found that genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of beta-amyloid cleaving enzyme (BACE1) markedly accelerate axonal regeneration in the injured peripheral nerves of mice. We postulate that accelerated nerve regeneration is due to blockade of BACE1 cleavage of two different BACE1 substrates. The two candidate substrates are the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in axons and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) on macrophages, which infiltrate injured nerves and clear the inhibitory myelin debris. In the coming years, we will systematically explore genetic manipulations of these two substrates in regard to accelerated axonal regeneration and rapid myelin debris removal seen in BACE1 KO mice. We also study axonal sprouting and regeneration in motor neuron disease models.

    Research Areas: genomics, nerve regeneration, nervous system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mohamed Farah, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • Molecular Oncology Laboratory

    Our Molecular Oncology lab seeks to understand the genomic wiring of response and resistance to immunotherapy through integrative genomic, transcriptomic, single-cell and liquid biopsy analyses of tumor and immune evolution. Through comprehensive exome-wide sequence and genome-wide structural genomic analyses we have discovered that tumor cells evade immune surveillance by elimination of immunogenic mutations and associated neoantigens through chromosomal deletions. Additionally, we have developed non-invasive molecular platforms that incorporate ultra-sensitive measurements of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) to assess clonal dynamics during immunotherapy. These approaches have revealed distinct dynamic ctDNA and T cell repertoire patterns of clinical response and resistance that are superior to radiographic response assessments. Our work has provided the foundation for a molecular response-adaptive clinical trial, where therapeutic decisions are made not based on imaging but b...ased on molecular responses derived from liquid biopsies. Overall, our group focuses on studying the temporal and spatial order of the metastatic and immune cascade under the selective pressure of immune checkpoint blockade with the ultimate goal to translate this knowledge into “next-generation” clinical trials and change the way oncologists select patients for immunotherapy. view more

    Research Areas: integrative mutli-omic analyses, Cancer genomics, liquid biopsies, tumor evolution, lung cancer, immunogenomic biomarkers

    Principal Investigator

    Valsamo Anagnostou, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Mollie Meffert Lab

    The Mollie Meffert Lab studies mechanisms underlying enduring changes in brain function. We are interested in understanding how programs of gene expression are coordinated and maintained to produce changes in synaptic, neuronal and cognitive function. Rather than concentrating on single genes, our research is particularly focused on understanding the upstream processes that allow neuronal stimuli to synchronously orchestrate both up and down-regulation of the many genes required to mediate changes in growth and excitation. This process of gene target specificity is implicit to the appropriate production of gene expression programs that control lasting alterations in brain function.

    Research Areas: cognition, neuronal function, synaptic function, brain, genomics

  • Nathaniel Comfort Lab

    Research in the Nathaniel Comfort Lab looks at the history of biology. Areas of particular interest include heredity and health in 20th century America, genetics, molecular biology, biomedicine, the history of recent science, oral history and interviewing.

    Research Areas: biomedicine, history of biology, genomics, history of medicine, molecular biology

  • Nauder Faraday Lab

    The Nauder Faraday Lab investigates topics within perioperative genetic and molecular medicine. We explore thrombotic, bleeding and infectious surgical complications. Our goal is to uncover the molecular determinants of outcome in surgical patients, which will enable surgeons to better personalize a patient’s care in the perioperative period. Our team is funded by the National Institutes of Health to research platelet phenotypes, the pharmacogenomics of antiplatelet agents for preventing cardiovascular disease, and the genotypic determinants of aspirin response in high-risk families.

    Research Areas: cardiac surgery, molecular medicine, post-surgical outcomes, genomics, cardiovascular diseases, post-surgery complications

  • Peisong Gao Lab

    The Peisong Gao Lab’s major focus is to understand the immunological and genetic regulation of allergic diseases. We have been involved in the identification of the genetic basis for atopic dermatitis and eczema herpeticum (ADEH) as part of the NIH Atopic Dermatitis and Vaccinia Network-Clinical Studies Consortium. Major projects in the Gao Lab include immunogenetic analysis of human response to allergen, identification of candidate genes for specific immune responsiveness to cockroach allergen, and epigenetics of food allergy (FA).

    Research Areas: food allergies, eczema herpeticum, epigenetics, allergies, genomics, atopic dermatitis

    Principal Investigator

    Peisong Gao, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Phenotyping and Pathology Core

    The Phenotyping Core promotes functional genomics and other preclinical translational science at Johns Hopkins. We assist and collaborate in the characterization and use of genetically and phenotypically relevant animal models of disease and gene function.

    Research Areas: pathobiology, phenotyping, translational research, genomics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Cory Brayton, D.V.M.

    Department

    Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology

  • Philip Wong Lab

    The Philip Wong Lab seeks to understand the molecular mechanisms and identification of new therapeutic targets of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Taking advantage of discoveries of genes linked to these diseases (mutant APP and PS in familial AD and mutant SOD1, dynactin p150glued ALS4and ALS2 in familial ALS), our laboratory is taking a molecular/cellular approach, including transgenic, gene targeting and RNAi strategies in mice, to develop models that facilitate our understanding of pathogenesis of disease and the identification and validation of novel targets for mechanism-based therapeutics. Significantly, these mouse models are instrumental for study of disease mechanisms, as well as for design and testing of therapeutic strategies for AD and ALS.

    Research Areas: neurodegenerative disorders, ALS, genomics, pathogenesis, Alzheimer's disease

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Philip Wong, Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Rasika Mathias Lab

    Research in the Rasika Mathias Lab focuses on the genetics of asthma in people of African ancestry. Our work led to the first genomewide association study of its kind in 2009. Currently, we are analyzing the whole-genome sequence of more than 1,000 people of African ancestry from the Consortium on Asthma among African-ancestry Populations in the Americas (CAAPA). CAAPA’s goal is to use whole-genome sequencing to expand our understanding of how genetic variants affect asthma risk in populations of African ancestry and to provide a public catalog of genetic variation for the scientific community. We’re also involved in the study of coronary artery disease though the GeneSTAR Program, which aims to identify mechanisms of atherogenic vascular diseases and attendant comorbidities.

    Research Areas: heart disease, African Americans, asthma, genomics, health disparities

    Principal Investigator

    Rasika Mathias, Sc.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Reeves Lab

    The Reeves Lab complements genetic analyses in human beings with the creation and characterization of mouse models to understand why and how gene dosage imbalance disrupts development in Down syndrome (DS). These models then provide a basis to explore therapeutic approaches to amelioration of DS features. We use chromosome engineering in embryonic stem cells (ES) to create defined dosage imbalance in order to localize the genes contributing to these anomalies and to directly test hypotheses concerning Down syndrome "critical regions" on human chromosome 21.

    Research Areas: Down syndrome, stem cells, chromosome 21, genomics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Roger Reeves, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

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