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Research Lab Results for epigenetics

Displaying 1 to 12 of 12 results
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  • Alison Moliterno Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Alison Moliterno, M.D.
    Medicine

    The Alison Moliterno Lab studies the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis and idiopathic myelofibrosis. Our research is focused on the genetic and epigenetic lesions associated with MPDs, with the goal of improving diagnosis and treatment for these disorders.

    Research Areas: blood disorders, idiopathic myelofibrosis, essential thrombocytosis, epigenetics, genomics, polycythemia vera, myeloproliferative disorders
  • Andrew Feinberg Laboratory

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Andrew Feinberg, M.D., M.P.H.
    Medicine

    The Feinberg Laboratory studies the epigenetic basis of normal development and disease, including cancer, aging and neuropsychiatric illness. Early work from our group involved the discovery of altered DNA methylation in cancer as well as common epigenetic (methylation and imprinting) variants in the population that may be responsible for a significant population-attributable risk of cancer.

    Over the last few years, we have pioneered the field of epigenomics (i.e., epigenetics at a genome-scale level), founding the first NIH-supported NIH epigenome center in the country and developing many novel tools for molecular and statistical analysis. Current research examines the mechanisms of epigenetic modification, the epigenetic basis of cancer, the invention of new molecular, statistical, and epidemiological tools for genome-scale epigenetics and the epigenetic basis of neuropsychiatric disease, including schizophrenia and autism.

    Research Areas: autism, cancer, epigenetics, schizophrenia, human development, aging, DNA, genomics, neuropsychiatric disease
  • Constance Monitto Lab

    Lab Website

    The Constance Monitto Lab conducts clinical research on pediatric pain management as well as basic science studies on chemotherapy resistance. In our pediatric pain management research, we work to assess the impact of low-dose opioid antagonism on opioid-related side effects, such as nausea and vomiting. We also analyze data on current methods of pediatric pain management in the United States. In addition, our team uses basic science studies to assess the success of epigenetic gene regulation on the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in cancer.

    Research Areas: chemotherapy, opioids, epigenetics, gene regulation, pain, pediatrics
  • Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer Laboratory

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Michael Goggins, M.B.B.Ch., M.D.
    Medicine

    The goal of the lab's research is to identify molecular abnormalities that can improve the outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer and those at risk of developing this disease. Much of our work is focused on translational research evaluating markers and marker technologies that can help screen patients with an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

    Thus, marker efforts have been focused mostly on identifying markers of advanced precancerous neoplasia (PanINs and IPMNs) that could improve our ability to effectively screen patients at risk of developing pancreatic cancer. We lead or participate in a number of clinical research protocols involved in the screening and early detection of pancreatic neoplasia including the CAPS clinical trials. We maintain a large repository of specimens from cases and controls with and without pancreatic disease and use this repository to investigate candidate markers of pancreatic cancer for their utility to predict pancreatic cancer risk.
    ...
    In addition, we have been working to identify familial pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes and identified BRCA2 as a pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene in 1996. We participate in the PACGENE consortium and the familial pancreatic cancer sequencing initiative. My lab also investigates pancreatic cancer genetics, epigenetics, molecular pathology, tumor stromal interactions and functional analysis of candidate genes and miRNAs. Dr. Goggins is the principal investigator of a phase I/II clinical trial evaluating the Parp inhibitor, olaparib along with irinotecan and cisplatin for patients with pancreatic cancer.
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    Research Areas: pancreatic cancer
  • GI Biomarkers Laboratory

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Stephen Meltzer, M.D.
    Medicine

    The GI Biomarkers Laboratory studies gastrointestinal cancer and pre-cancer biogenesis and biomarkers. The lab is led by Dr. Stephen Meltzer, who is known for his research in the molecular pathobiology of gastrointestinal malignancy and premalignancy. Research in the lab has led to several groundbreaking genomic, epigenomic and bioinformatic studies of esophageal and colonic neoplasms, shifting the gastrointestinal research paradaigm toward genome-wide approaches.

    Research Areas: gastrointestinal system, biomarkers, cancer, epigenetics, genomics, bioinformatics, biogenesis
  • Karen Reddy Laboratory

    Principal Investigator:
    Karen Reddy, Ph.D.
    Biological Chemistry

    The focus of the research in the Reddy Laboratory is to begin to understand how the nuclear periphery and other subcompartments contribute to general nuclear architecture and to specific gene regulation. Our research goals can be broken down into three complementary areas of research: understanding how genes are regulated at the nuclear periphery, deciphering how genes are localized (or "addressed") to specific nuclear compartments and how these processes are utilized in development and corrupted in disease.

    Research Areas: biological chemistry, cell biology, nuclear structure, epigenetics, gene regulation
  • Li Gao Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Li Gao, M.D., Ph.D.
    Medicine

    The Li Gao Lab researches functional genomics, molecular genetics and epigenetics of complex cardiopulmonary and allergic diseases, with a focus on translational research applying fundamental genetic insight into the clinical setting. Current research includes implementation of high-throughput technologies in the fields of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), massively parallel sequencing, gene expression analysis, epigenetic mapping and integrative genomics in ongoing research of complex lung diseases and allergic diseases including asthma, atopic dermatitis (AD), pulmonary arterial hypertension, COPD, sepsis and acute lung injury/ARDS; and epigenetic contributions to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with systemic sclerosis.

    Research Areas: pulmonary arterial hypertension, molecular genetics, cardiopulmonary diseases, asthma, epigenetics, complex lung disease, allergies, genomics, COPD, atopic dermatitis
  • Peisong Gao Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Peisong Gao, M.D., Ph.D.
    Medicine

    The Peisong Gao Lab’s major focus is to understand the immunological and genetic regulation of allergic diseases. We have been involved in the identification of the genetic basis for atopic dermatitis and eczema herpeticum (ADEH) as part of the NIH Atopic Dermatitis and Vaccinia Network-Clinical Studies Consortium. Major projects in the Gao Lab include immunogenetic analysis of human response to allergen, identification of candidate genes for specific immune responsiveness to cockroach allergen, and epigenetics of food allergy (FA).

    Research Areas: food allergies, eczema herpeticum, epigenetics, allergies, genomics, atopic dermatitis
  • Sean Taverna Laboratory

    The Taverna Laboratory studies histone marks, such as lysine methylation and acetylation, and how they contribute to an epigenetic/histone code that dictates chromatin-templated functions like transcriptional activation and gene silencing. Our lab uses biochemistry and cell biology in a variety of model organisms to explore connections between gene regulation and proteins that write and read histone marks, many of which have clear links to human diseases like leukemia and other cancers. We also investigate links between small RNAs and histone marks involved in gene silencing.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, histone marks, cell biology, leukemia, cancer, epigenetics, eukaryotic cells, gene silencing, RNA
  • Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian Lab

    Lab Website

    Dr. Yegnasubramanian directs a Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (SKCCC), and is also the Director of the SKCCC Next Generation Sequencing Center.


    Our lab research is focused on understanding the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in carcinogenesis and disease progression, and to exploit this understanding in developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and risk stratification as well as in identifying targets for therapeutic intervention.

    Research Areas: cancer therapies, biomarkers, genetics, cancer, epigenetics
  • William G. Nelson Laboratory

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    William Nelson, M.D., Ph.D.
    Oncology

    Normal and neoplastic cells respond to genome integrity threats in a variety of different ways. Furthermore, the nature of these responses are critical both for cancer pathogenesis and for cancer treatment. DNA damaging agents activate several signal transduction pathways in damaged cells which trigger cell fate decisions such as proliferation, genomic repair, differentiation, and cell death. For normal cells, failure of a DNA damaging agent (i.e., a carcinogen) to activate processes culminating in DNA repair or in cell death might promote neoplastic transformation. For cancer cells, failure of a DNA damaging agent (i.e., an antineoplastic drug) to promote differentiation or cell death might undermine cancer treatment.

    Our laboratory has discovered the most common known somatic genome alteration in human prostatic carcinoma cells. The DNA lesion, hypermethylation of deoxycytidine nucleotides in the promoter of a carcinogen-defense enzyme gene, appears to result in inactivation of th...e gene and a resultant increased vulnerability of prostatic cells to carcinogens.
    Studies underway in the laboratory have been directed at characterizing the genomic abnormality further, and at developing methods to restore expression of epigenetically silenced genes and/or to augment expression of other carcinogen-defense enzymes in prostate cells as prostate cancer prevention strategies.

    Another major interest pursued in the laboratory is the role of chronic or recurrent inflammation as a cause of prostate cancer. Genetic studies of familial prostate cancer have identified defects in genes regulating host inflammatory responses to infections.
    A newly described prostate lesion, proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA), appears to be an early prostate cancer precursor. Current experimental approaches feature induction of chronic prostate inflammation in laboratory mice and rats, and monitoring the consequences on the development of PIA and prostate cancer.
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    Research Areas: cellular biology, cancer, epigenetics, DNA
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