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Displaying 11 to 14 of 14 results for epigenetics

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  • Peisong Gao Lab

    The Peisong Gao Lab’s major focus is to understand the immunological and genetic regulation of allergic diseases. We have been involved in the identification of the genetic basis for atopic dermatitis and eczema herpeticum (ADEH) as part of the NIH Atopic Dermatitis and Vaccinia Network-Clinical Studies Consortium. Major projects in the Gao Lab include immunogenetic analysis of human response to allergen, identification of candidate genes for specific immune responsiveness to cockroach allergen, and epigenetics of food allergy (FA).

    Research Areas: food allergies, eczema herpeticum, epigenetics, allergies, genomics, atopic dermatitis

    Principal Investigator

    Peisong Gao, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sean Taverna Laboratory

    The Taverna Laboratory studies histone marks, such as lysine methylation and acetylation, and how they contribute to an epigenetic/histone code that dictates chromatin-templated functions like transcriptional activation and gene silencing. Our lab uses biochemistry and cell biology in a variety of model organisms to explore connections between gene regulation and proteins that write and read histone marks, many of which have clear links to human diseases like leukemia and other cancers. We also investigate links between small RNAs and histone marks involved in gene silencing.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, histone marks, cell biology, leukemia, cancer, epigenetics, eukaryotic cells, gene silencing, RNA

  • Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian Lab

    Dr. Yegnasubramanian directs a Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (SKCCC), and is also the Director of the SKCCC Next Generation Sequencing Center.


    Our lab research is focused on understanding the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in carcinogenesis and disease progression, and to exploit this understanding in developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and risk stratification as well as in identifying targets for therapeutic intervention.

    Research Areas: cancer therapies, biomarkers, genetics, cancer, epigenetics

  • William G. Nelson Laboratory

    Normal and neoplastic cells respond to genome integrity threats in a variety of different ways. Furthermore, the nature of these responses are critical both for cancer pathogenesis and for cancer treatment. DNA damaging agents activate several signal transduction pathways in damaged cells which trigger cell fate decisions such as proliferation, genomic repair, differentiation, and cell death. For normal cells, failure of a DNA damaging agent (i.e., a carcinogen) to activate processes culminating in DNA repair or in cell death might promote neoplastic transformation. For cancer cells, failure of a DNA damaging agent (i.e., an antineoplastic drug) to promote differentiation or cell death might undermine cancer treatment.

    Our laboratory has discovered the most common known somatic genome alteration in human prostatic carcinoma cells. The DNA lesion, hypermethylation of deoxycytidine nucleotides in the promoter of a carcinogen-defense enzyme gene, appears to result in inactivation of th...e gene and a resultant increased vulnerability of prostatic cells to carcinogens.
    Studies underway in the laboratory have been directed at characterizing the genomic abnormality further, and at developing methods to restore expression of epigenetically silenced genes and/or to augment expression of other carcinogen-defense enzymes in prostate cells as prostate cancer prevention strategies.

    Another major interest pursued in the laboratory is the role of chronic or recurrent inflammation as a cause of prostate cancer. Genetic studies of familial prostate cancer have identified defects in genes regulating host inflammatory responses to infections.
    A newly described prostate lesion, proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA), appears to be an early prostate cancer precursor. Current experimental approaches feature induction of chronic prostate inflammation in laboratory mice and rats, and monitoring the consequences on the development of PIA and prostate cancer.
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    Research Areas: cellular biology, cancer, epigenetics, DNA

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    William Nelson, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

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