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  • Adam D. Sylvester Lab

    Research in the Adam D. Sylvester Lab primarily focuses on the way in which humans and primates move through the environment, with the aim of reconstructing the locomotor repertoire of extinct hominins and other primates. We use a quantitative approach that involves the statistical analysis of three-dimensional biological shapes, specifically musculoskeletal structures, and then link the anatomy to function and function to locomotor behavior.

    Research Areas: anatomy, biomechanics, locomotion, evolution, skeletal morphology

  • Alan Scott Lab

    Research in the Alan Scott Lab involves several important areas of genomics. Our team collaborates on a study to investigate the exon and genome sequence variants that determine phenotype, with a specific focus on the genetic bases of cleft lip and palate. We are also involved in assessing and improving genomic technologies to provide next-generation sequencing and analysis of sequence data to the clinical environment. In addition, we have a longstanding interest in the problem of gene annotation and the evolutionary genomics of vertebrates, especially endangered species.

    Research Areas: evolutionary genomics, sequence analysis, genomics, genome annotation, genomic technologies, cleft lip and palate

    Principal Investigator

    Alan Scott, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Brendan Cormack Laboratory

    The Brendan Cormack Laboratory studies fungal pathogenesis, particularly the host-pathogen interaction for the yeast pathogen Candida glabrata.

    We are trying to identify virulence genes (genes that evolved in response to the host environment) by screening transposon mutants of C. glabrata for mutants that are specifically altered in adherence to epithelial cells, in survival in the presence of macrophages and PMNs. We also screen mutants directly in mice for those unable to colonize or persist in the normal target organs (liver, kidney and spleen).

    We also focus research on a family of genes--the EPA genes--that allow the organism to bind to host cells. Our research shows that a subset of them are able to mediate adherence to host epithelial cells. We are trying to understand the contribution of this family to virulence in C. glabrata by figuring out what the ligand specificity is of different family members, how genes are normally regulated during infection, and what mechanism...s normally act to keep the genes transcriptionally silent and how that silence is regulated. view more

    Research Areas: candida glabrata, pathogenesis, virulence genes, yeast, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Brendan Cormack, Ph.D.

    Department

    Molecular Biology and Genetics

  • Brown Lab

    The Brown Lab is focused on the function of the cerebral cortex in the brain, which underlies our ability to interact with our environment through sensory perception and voluntary movement. Our research takes a bottom-up approach to understanding how the circuits of this massively interconnected network of neurons are functionally organized, and how dysfunction in these circuits contributes to neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. By combining electrophysiological and optogenetic approaches with anatomical and genetic techniques for identifying cell populations and pathways, the Brown Lab is defining the synaptic interactions among different classes of cortical neurons and determining how long-range and local inputs are integrated within cortical circuits. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, corticospinal and spinal motor neurons progressively degenerate. The Brown Lab is examining how abnormal ...activity within cortical circuits contributes to the selective degeneration of corticospinal motor neurons in an effort to identify new mechanisms for treating this disease. Abnormalities in the organization of cortical circuits and synapses have been identified in genetic and anatomical studies of neuropsychiatric disease. We are interested in the impact these abnormalities have on cortical processing and their contribution to the disordered cognition typical of autism and schizophrenia. view more

    Research Areas: autism, neurodegenerative diseases, brain, electrophysiology, ALS, schizophrenia, cerebral cortex, optogenetics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Solange Brown, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Christopher B. Ruff Lab

    Research in the Christopher B. Ruff Lab focuses on biomechanics and primate locomotion, skeletal growth and development, osteoporosis, skeletal remodeling and the evolution of the hominoid postcranium. We primarily explore how variation in skeletal morphology is related to mechanical forces applied during life. Our studies have shown that the skeleton adapts to its mechanical environment, both developmentally and through evolutionary time, by altering its structural organization.

    Research Areas: anatomy, osteoporosis, biomechanics, locomotion, evolution, skeletal morphology

  • Clare Rock Lab

    Dr. Clare Rock is an assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Associate hospital Epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Faculty Member at Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. Her research interest focuses the prevention of pathogen transmission in the hospital environment. This includes novel strategies of improving patient room cleaning and disinfection, including human factors engineering approaches, and conducting robust clinical trials to examine effectiveness of "no touch" novel technologies such as UV-C light. She has particular interest in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae transmission in the hospital environment, including outbreak management, and transmission and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile. Her other area of interest is diagnostic stewardship, and the behavioral, cultural and human factors aspects of implementation of initiatives to enhance appropriate use of ...diagnostic tests. She leads a national initiative, as part of the High Value Practice Academic Alliance, examining strategies for appropriate testing for Clostridium difficile. This is a wider implementation of work that Dr. Rock conducted with The Johns Hopkins Health System facilities.

    Dr. Rock has multiple sources of grant funding including from the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and industry. Dr. Rock is Vice Chair of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network, and serves on the SHEA research committee. Dr. Rock earned her M.B.B.Ch. at the University College Dublin School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, and her MS masters of clinical science of research at the University of Maryland, where she received the MS scholar award for epidemiology.
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    Research Areas: diagnostic stewardship, Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), infections, infection control, hospital epidemiology, quality of care

    Principal Investigator

    Clare Rock, M.B.B.Ch.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Craig Pollack Lab

    Research in the Craig Pollack Lab focuses on cancer prevention and control, particularly prostate cancer. Our work aims to understand how the organization environment of health care affects the type and quality of care that patients receive. Other work investigates the broader social context of health and health care— specifically housing, financial hardship and socioeconomic status.

    Research Areas: sociodemographics, prostate, cancer, quality of care

    Principal Investigator

    Craig Pollack, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Deidra Crews Lab

    Research in the Deidra Crews Lab focuses on health disparities in chronic kidney disease. We have studied how social determinants of health, such as poverty and healthful food access, affect disparities in kidney disease outcomes. Our research on end-stage renal disease includes studies of the best timing and environment to initiate dialysis among vulnerable populations.

    Research Areas: poverty, chronic kidney disease, health disparities

    Principal Investigator

    Deidra Crews, M.D., Sc.M.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Erwin Lab

    Schizophrenia, autism and other neurological disorders are caused by a complex interaction between inherited genetic risk and environmental experiences. The overarching goal of the group are to reveal molecular mechanisms of gene by environment interactions related to altered neural development and liability for brain disorders. Our research uses a hybrid of human stem cell models, post-mortem tissue and computational approaches to interrogate the contribution of epigenetic regulation and somatic mosaicism to brain diseases. Our previous work has demonstrated that the human brain exhibits extensive genetic variability between neurons within the same brain, termed "somatic mosaicism" due to mobile DNA elements which mediate large somatic DNA copy number variants. We study environment-responsive mechanisms and consequences for somatic mosaicism and are discovering the landscape of somatic mosaicism in the brain. We also study the epigenetic regulation of cell specification and activity-d...ependent states within the human dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex and striatum. view more

    Research Areas: autism, Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience, stem cells, Developmental Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Disease, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models, Organoids, schizophrenia, genomics, Dystonia, Epigenomics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jennifer Erwin, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • James Fackler Lab

    Research in the James Fackler Lab explores the operational side of the hospital environment, seeking ways to optimize patient care and physician decision-making. Our work includes building a mathematical model of how patients move throughout a hospital, which we believe will help hospitals better predict the influx of emergency cases and therefore optimize resource preparation and scheduling of elective procedures. We also research data acquisition and data mining in the operating room and intensive care unit, with a goal of identifying patterns and trends.

    Research Areas: hospital-based medical practices, data analysis, decision making

  • James Knierim Laboratory

    Research in the James Knierim Laboratory attempts to understand the flow of information through the hippocampal formation and the computations performed by the various subfields of the hippocampus and its inputs from the entorhinal cortex. To address these issues, we use multi-electrode arrays to record the extracellular action potentials from scores of well-isolated hippocampal neurons in freely moving rats.

    These neurons, or "place cells," are selectively active when the rat occupies restricted locations in its environment and help to form a cognitive map of the environment. The animal uses this map to navigate efficiently in its environment and to learn and remember important locations. These cells are thought to play a major role in the formation of episodic (autobiographical) memories. Place cells thus constitute a tremendous opportunity to investigate the mechanisms by which the brain transforms sensory input into an internal, cognitive representation of the world and then use...s this representation as the framework that organizes and stores memories of past events. view more

    Research Areas: cognition, place cells, memory, neurophysiology, hippocampus

    Principal Investigator

    James Knierim, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • James Pekar Lab

    How do we see, hear, and think? More specifically, how can we study living people to understand how the brain sees, hears, and thinks? Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a powerful anatomical imaging technique widely used for clinical diagnosis, was further developed into a tool for probing brain function. By sensitizing magnetic resonance images to the changes in blood oxygenation that occur when regions of the brain are highly active, we can make "movies" that reveal the brain at work. Dr. Pekar works on the development and application of this MRI technology.

    Dr. Pekar is a biophysicist who uses a variety of magnetic resonance techniques to study brain physiology and function. Dr. Pekar serves as Manager of the F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, a research resource where imaging scientists and neuroscientists collaborate to study brain function using unique state-of-the-art techniques in a safe comfortable environment, to further develop such techni...ques, and to provide training and education. Dr. Pekar works with center staff to serve the center's users and to keep the center on the leading edge of technology.
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    Research Areas: magnetic resonance, functional magnetic resonance imaging, radiology

  • Jantzie Lab

    Dr. Jantzie, associate professor, received her Ph.D. in Neurochemistry from the University of Alberta in 2008. In 2013 she completed her postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurology at Boston Children's Hospital & Harvard Medical School and became faculty at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Jantzie then joined the faculty Departments of Pediatrics (Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine) and Neurology at Johns Hopkins University and the Kennedy Krieger Institute in January 2019. Her lab investigates the pathophysiology of encephalopathy of prematurity, and pediatric brain injury common to infants and toddlers. Dr. Jantzie is dedicated to understanding disease processes in the developing brain as a means to identifying new therapeutic strategies and treatment targets for perinatal brain injury. Her lab studies neural substrates of cognition and executive function, inhibitory circuit formation, the role of an abnormal intrauterine environment on brain development, mechanisms of neurorepa...ir and microglial activation and polarization. Using a diverse array of clinically relevant techniques such as MRI, cognitive assessment, and biomarker discovery, combined with traditional molecular and cellular biology, the Jantzie lab is on the front lines of translational pediatric neuroscience.? view more

    Research Areas: Neonatology, neuroscience

    Principal Investigator

    Lauren Jantzie, Ph.D.

    Department

    Pediatrics

  • Josef Coresh Lab

    Research in the Josef Coresh Lab focuses on cardiovascular epidemiology, kidney disease and genetic epidemiology. Our team uses innovative methods to quantify disease burden and consequences in the population; studies the causes and consequences of vascular disease in the heart, kidneys and brain; and works to develop a strong scientific basis for quantifying the burden, causes and consequences of kidney disease. Working in collaboration with leading laboratories and specialists, we also aim to quantify the interplay of genes and environment in health and disease.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, genetics, kidney diseases, cardiovascular, vascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Josef Coresh, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Laboratory of Auditory Neurophysiology

    Research in the Laboratory of Auditory Neurophysiology aims to understand brain mechanism responsible for auditory perception and vocal communication in a naturalistic environment. We are interested in revealing neural mechanisms operating in the cerebral cortex and how cortical representations of biologically important sounds emerge through development and learning.

    We use a combination of state-of-the-art neurophysiological techniques and sophisticated computational and engineering tools to tackle our research questions.

    Current research in our laboratory includes the following areas (1) neural basis of auditory perception, (2) neural mechanisms for vocal communication and social interaction, and (3) cortical processing of cochlear implant stimulation.

    Research Areas: neurophysiology, neuroengineering, audiology, cochlear implant, learning, language

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Xiaoqin Wang, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

  • Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory

    The Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory is interested in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental diseases such as schizophrenia and autism. The major focus of our laboratory is to evaluate how adverse environmental factors and vulnerable genes interact to affect brain and behavior development. We address these experimental questions by using methods of cell and molecular biology, neuroimmunology, neurochemistry, psychopharmacology and developmental psychobiology. The current projects in our laboratory are: (1) Genetic risk factors in neuron-astrocyte interaction during neurodevelopment, (2) Gene-environment interplay in the pathogenesis of psychiatric conditions, and (3) The neuroimmune interactions in abnormal neurodevelopment

    Research Areas: autism, immunology, neurobiology, cell biology, neurodevelopment, developmental psychobiology, schizophrenia, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

  • Pedersen Laboratory

    The Pedersen Laboratory is interested in cell energetics and the relationship of cell energetics to molecular medicine and disease. Both mitochondrial and glycolytic processes are being studied at the tissue, cell, and molecular level. Also, the relationship of these processes to cancer and heart disease, the two major causes of death in the U.S., is being studied with the objective of discovering and developing new therapies.

    Specific projects in the laboratory that are currently under investigation include: 1) The structure, mechanism, and regulation of the mitochondrial ATP synthase/ATPase complex; 2) The molecular basis of cancer's most common phenotype, i.e., an elevated glucose metabolism; and 3) The regulation of heart function under normal and ischemic conditions as it relates to the mitochondrial ATP synthase/ATPase complex.

    Our team consists of chemists, biologists and clinicians who work together in a highly collaborative environment.

    Research Areas: heart disease, cancer, cell energetics, mitochondria, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Pedersen, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Robert Lawrence Lab

    Research in the Robert Lawrence Lab examines how industrial agriculture, food security and human rights affect the environment.

    Research Areas: food security, agriculture, environment, human rights

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Lawrence, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Robert Shochet Lab

    The Robert Shochet Lab focuses on medical education research, including the impact of learning communities on students' perceptions of the learning environment in medical school.

    Research Areas: medical education, learning communities

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Shochet, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sharon Kingsland Lab

    The Sharon Kingsland Lab conducts research focused on the history of modern life sciences. Our team is currently studying the history of ecology and environmental problems in the immediate post-war period, both in the United States and internationally. Our goal is to better understand physiological ecology and the relationship between ecology and agriculture. We are also investigating the design of new laboratories for environmental sciences; emerging environmental problems such as photochemical smog; and the overlap of environmental and molecular sciences.

    Research Areas: history of biology, genetics, pollution, agriculture, environment, ecology

    Principal Investigator

    Sharon Kingsland, Ph.D.

    Department

    History of Medicine

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