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Displaying 1 to 10 of 24 results for engineering

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  • Advanced Optics Lab

    The Advanced Optics Lab uses innovative optical tools, including laser-based nanotechnologies, to understand cell motility and the regulation of cell shape. We pioneered laser-based nanotechnologies, including optical tweezers, nanotracking, and laser-tracking microrheology. Applications range from physics, pharmaceutical delivery by phagocytosis (cell and tissue engineering), bacterial pathogens important in human disease and cell division.

    Other projects in the lab are related to microscopy, specifically combining fluorescence and electron microscopy to view images of the subcellular structure around proteins.

    Research Areas: optics, microscopy, physics, cellular biology, imaging, nanotechnology, drugs, tissue engineering

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Scot Kuo, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

  • Andrew Douglas Lab

    Research in the Andrew Douglas Lab investigates topics within the field of biomedical engineering. Our studies primarily focus on soft biological tissues and organs, such as the heart and tongue. Our current research areas include the nonlinear mechanics of solids, the mechanical response of compliant biological tissues, finite deformation elasticity, and the static and dynamic fracture of ductile materials.

    Research Areas: biomedicine, soft tissues, biomedical engineering, organs

    Principal Investigator

    Andrew Douglas, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

  • Andrew Lane Lab

    The Lane laboratory is focused on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying chronic rhinosinusitis and particularly the pathogenesis of nasal polyps.  Diverse techniques in molecular biology, immunology, physiology, and engineering are utilized to study epithelial cell innate immunity, olfactory loss, the sinus microbiome, and drug delivery to the nose and sinus cavities. Ongoing work explores how epithelial cells participate in the immune response and contribute to chronic sinonasal inflammation. The lab creates and employs transgenic mouse models of chronic sinusitis to support research in this area. Collaborations are in place with the School of Public Health to explore mechanisms of anti-viral immunity in influenza and rhinovirus, and with the University of Maryland to characterize the bacterial microbiome of the nose and sinuses in health and disease.

    Research Areas: nasal polyps, olfaction, cell culture, transgenic mice, chronic rhinosinusitis, innate immunity, molecular biology

  • Beer Lab

    The goal of research in the Beer Lab is to understand how gene regulatory information is encoded in genomic DNA sequence. Our work uses functional genomics DNase-seq, ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, and chromatin state data to computationally identify combinations of transcription factor binding sites that operate to define the activity of cell-type specific enhancers. We are currently focused on improving SVM methodology by including more general sequence features and constraints predicting the impact of SNPs on enhancer activity (delta-SVM) and GWAS association for specific diseases, experimentally assessing the predicted impact of regulatory element mutation in mammalian cells, systematically determining regulatory element logic from ENCODE human and mouse data, and using this sequence based regulatory code to assess common modes of regulatory element evolution and variation.

    Research Areas: computational biology, biomedical engineering, DNA, genomics, RNA

  • Cardiology Bioengineering Laboratory

    The Cardiology Bioengineering Laboratory, located in the Johns Hopkins Hospital, focuses on the applications of advanced imaging techniques for arrhythmia management. The primary limitation of current fluoroscopy-guided techniques for ablation of cardiac arrhythmia is the inability to visualize soft tissues and 3-dimensional anatomic relationships.

    Implementation of alternative advanced modalities has the potential to improve complex ablation procedures by guiding catheter placement, visualizing abnormal scar tissue, reducing procedural time devoted to mapping, and eliminating patient and operator exposure to radiation.

    Active projects include
    • Physiological differences between isolated hearts in ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity
    • Successful ablation sites in ischemic ventricular tachycardia in a porcine model and the correlation to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
    • MRI-guided radiofrequency ablation of canine atrial fibrillation, and ...diagnosis and intervention for arrhythmias
    • Physiological and metabolic effects of interruptions in chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Henry Halperin, MD, is co-director of the Johns Hopkins Imaging Institute of Excellence and a
    professor of medicine, radiology and biomedical engineering. Menekhem M. Zviman, PhD is the laboratory manager.
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    Research Areas: magnetic resonance imaging, CPR models, cardiac mechanics, MRI-guided therapy, ischemic tachycardia, arrhythmia, cardiology, sudden cardiac death, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, computational modeling

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Henry Halperin, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Clare Rock Lab

    Dr. Clare Rock is an assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Associate hospital Epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Faculty Member at Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. Her research interest focuses the prevention of pathogen transmission in the hospital environment. This includes novel strategies of improving patient room cleaning and disinfection, including human factors engineering approaches, and conducting robust clinical trials to examine effectiveness of "no touch" novel technologies such as UV-C light. She has particular interest in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae transmission in the hospital environment, including outbreak management, and transmission and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile. Her other area of interest is diagnostic stewardship, and the behavioral, cultural and human factors aspects of implementation of initiatives to enhance appropriate use of ...diagnostic tests. She leads a national initiative, as part of the High Value Practice Academic Alliance, examining strategies for appropriate testing for Clostridium difficile. This is a wider implementation of work that Dr. Rock conducted with The Johns Hopkins Health System facilities.

    Dr. Rock has multiple sources of grant funding including from the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and industry. Dr. Rock is Vice Chair of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network, and serves on the SHEA research committee. Dr. Rock earned her M.B.B.Ch. at the University College Dublin School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, and her MS masters of clinical science of research at the University of Maryland, where she received the MS scholar award for epidemiology.
    view more

    Research Areas: diagnostic stewardship, Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), infections, infection control, hospital epidemiology, quality of care

    Principal Investigator

    Clare Rock, M.B.B.Ch.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Daniel Kuespert Lab

    The Daniel Kuespert Lab conducts research on a range of topics within bioengineering. Past studies include exploring microscale behavior in amphiphilic fluid mixtures predicted by the SAFT equation as well as local order and microphase formation in fluids containing asymmetric molecules.

    Research Areas: bioengineering, engineering

    Principal Investigator

    Daniel Kuespert, M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Elisseeff Lab

    The mission of the Elisseeff Lab is to engineer technologies to repair lost tissues. We aim to bridge academic research and technology discovery to treat patients and address clinically relevant challenges related to tissue engineering. To accomplish this goal we are developing and enabling materials, studying biomaterial structure-function relationships and investigating mechanisms of tissue development to practically rebuild tissues. The general approach of tissue engineering is to place cells on a biomaterial scaffold that is designed to provide the appropriate signals to promote tissue development and ultimately restore normal tissue function in vivo. Understanding mechanisms of cellular interactions (both cell-cell and cell-material) and tissue development on scaffolds is critical to advancement of the field, particularly in applications employing stem cells. Translation of technologies to tissue-specific sites and diseased environments is key to better design, understanding, and... ultimately efficacy of tissue repair strategies. We desire to translate clinically practical strategies, in the form of biomaterials/medical devices, to guide and enhance the body's natural capacity for repair. To accomplish the interdisciplinary challenge of regenerative medicine research, we maintain a synergistic balance of basic and applied/translational research. view more

    Research Areas: stem cells, biomedical engineering, tissues

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jennifer Elisseeff, Ph.D.

    Department

    Ophthalmology

  • Grayson Lab for Craniofacial and Orthopaedic Tissue Engineering

    The Grayson Lab focuses on craniofacial and orthopaedic tissue engineering. Our research addresses the challenges associated with spatio-temporal control of stem cell fate in order to engineer complex tissue constructs. We are developing innovative methods to guide stem cell differentiation patterns and create patient-specific grafts with functional biological and mechanical characteristics. We employ engineering techniques to accurately control growth factor delivery to cells in biomaterial scaffolds as well as to design advanced bioreactors capable of maintaining cell viability in large tissue constructs. These technologies are used to enable precise control of the cellular microenvironment and uniquely address fundamental questions regarding the application of biophysical cues to regulate stem cell differentiation.

    Research Areas: stem cells, orthopaedics, biomedical engineering, biomaterials, craniofacial, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Warren Grayson, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

  • Green Group

    The Green Group is the biomaterials and drug delivery laboratory in the Biomedical Engineering Department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Our broad research interests are in cellular engineering and in nanobiotechnology. We are particularly interested in biomaterials, controlled drug delivery, stem cells, gene therapy, and immunobioengineering. We are working on the chemistry/biology/engineering interface to answer fundamental scientific questions and create innovative technologies and therapeutics that can directly benefit human health.

    Research Areas: nanobiotechnology, stem cells, biomedical engineering, drugs, immunobioengineering

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jordan Green, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

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