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Displaying 41 to 45 of 45 results for clinical trials

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  • Singh Lab: Stem Cell Transplant Group

    The goal of the Singh Lab is to cure retinal degeneration due to genetic disease in patients. There are many retinal diseases such as Stargardts, Macular Degeneration, and Retinitis Pigmentosa, that are currently incurable. These diseases damage and eventually eliminate photoreceptors in the retina. The lab's aim is to take healthy photoreceptors derived from stem cells and transplant them into the patient’s retina to replace the lost photoreceptors. The transplanted photoreceptors are left to mature, make connections with the recipient’s remaining retina, and restore vision. Further, the lab is most interested in the cone-photoreceptor rich region of the macula, which is the central zone of the human retina, enabling high-acuity vision for tasks such as facial recognition and reading.

    Research Areas: photoreceptor transplantation, retinal surgery technology and device development, retinal stem cell transplantation, clinical trials in retinal gene therapy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mandeep Singh, M.B.B.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Ophthalmology

  • Spinal Column Surgical Outcomes Lab

    The Spinal Column Surgical Outcomes Laboratory aims to improve the neurological outcomes and functional capacity of patients undergoing spinal surgery. We collect large-scale retrospective patient databases and prospective patient registries to report high-quality data relating to the outcomes of neurosurgical operations. The laboratory participates in the National neurosurgical Quality and Outcomes Database (N2QOD). This multi-institutional collaboration has set forth a 3-year prospective study to benchmark quality and surgical outcome measures across several academic institutions. The Spinal Column Surgical Outcomes Laboratory specializes in biostatistical analysis of large-scale clinical databases, studying the outcomes of traditional and novel spinal procedures, quality control and cost-effectiveness research and clinical trials relating to spinal surgery outcomes.

    Research Areas: spine

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Ali Bydon, M.D.

    Department

    Neurosurgery

  • Srinivasa Raja Lab

    Work in the Srinivasa Raja Lab seeks to better understand both the peripheral and central mechanisms that cause neuropathic pain, including various methods for treatment. A large focus of our research is on exploring the role of opioid and adrenergic receptor mechanisms in the management of chronic neuropathic pain. Our team also studies the mechanisms of spinal cord stimulation for treating chronic pain, and we have conducted controlled clinical trials in an effort to improve evidence-based practices for pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain.

    Research Areas: opioids, neuropathic pain, pain, evidence-based medicine, chronic pain

  • Steven Levin Lab

    Research in the Steven Levin Lab focuses on chemical neurolysis, epiduroscopy (and training for physicians), opioid administration, and the use of alternative therapies for pain management. In collaboration with the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics and with funding from a Donahue Foundation Grant, we study social and ethical considerations in pain management. We have also been involved in clinical trials of novel analgesics.

    Research Areas: opioids, pain management, chemical neurolysis, epiduroscopy

  • Vestibular NeuroEngineering Lab

    Research in the Vestibular NeuroEngineering Lab (VNEL) focuses on restoring inner ear function through “bionic” electrical stimulation, inner ear gene therapy, and enhancing the central nervous system’s ability to learn ways to use sensory input from a damaged inner ear. VNEL research involves basic and applied neurophysiology, biomedical engineering, clinical investigation and population-based epidemiologic studies. We employ techniques including single-unit electrophysiologic recording; histologic examination; 3-D video-oculography and magnetic scleral search coil measurements of eye movements; microCT; micro MRI; and finite element analysis. Our research subjects include computer models, circuits, animals and humans. For more information about VNEL, click here.
    VNEL is currently recruiting subjects for two first-in-human clinical trials:
    1) The MVI Multichannel Vestibular Implant Trial involves implantation of a “bionic” inner ear stimulator intended to partially restore sensation... of head movement. Without that sensation, the brain’s image- and posture-stabilizing reflexes fail, so affected individuals suffer difficulty with blurry vision, unsteady walking, chronic dizziness, mental fogginess and a high risk of falling. Based on designs developed and tested successfully in animals over the past the past 15 years at VNEL, the system used in this trial is very similar to a cochlear implant (in fact, future versions could include cochlear electrodes for use in patients who also have hearing loss). Instead of a microphone and cochlear electrodes, it uses gyroscopes to sense head movement, and its electrodes are implanted in the vestibular labyrinth. For more information on the MVI trial, click here.
    2) The CGF166 Inner Ear Gene Therapy Trial involves inner ear injection of a genetically engineered DNA sequence intended to restore hearing and balance sensation by creating new sensory cells (called “hair cells”). Performed at VNEL with the support of Novartis and through a collaboration with the University of Kansas and Columbia University, this is the world’s first trial of inner ear gene therapy in human subjects. Individuals with severe or profound hearing loss in both ears are invited to participate. For more information on the CGF166 trial, click here.
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    Research Areas: neuroengineering, audiology, multichannel vestibular prosthesis, balance disorders, balance, vestibular, prosthetics, cochlea, vestibular implant

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