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Displaying 1 to 8 of 8 results for cell culture

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  • Andrew Lane Lab

    The Lane laboratory is focused on understanding molecular mechanisms underlying chronic rhinosinusitis and particularly the pathogenesis of nasal polyps.  Diverse techniques in molecular biology, immunology, physiology, and engineering are utilized to study epithelial cell innate immunity, olfactory loss, the sinus microbiome, and drug delivery to the nose and sinus cavities. Ongoing work explores how epithelial cells participate in the immune response and contribute to chronic sinonasal inflammation. The lab creates and employs transgenic mouse models of chronic sinusitis to support research in this area. Collaborations are in place with the School of Public Health to explore mechanisms of anti-viral immunity in influenza and rhinovirus, and with the University of Maryland to characterize the bacterial microbiome of the nose and sinuses in health and disease.

    Research Areas: nasal polyps, olfaction, cell culture, transgenic mice, chronic rhinosinusitis, innate immunity, molecular biology

  • Cardiac Bioelectric Systems Laboratory

    The Cardiac Bioelectric Systems Laboratory research focuses on both the physiological and pathophysiological function of cardiac cells at a multicellular, syncytial level. We use cell culture models in a manner akin to mathematical models in which elements of the model can be designed, synthesized or controlled. Our traditional approach consists of cultured, confluent monolayers of cardiac cells that number in the tens of thousands to a million. These cell monolayers can be engineered in terms of their tissue architecture, cell type, protein expression and microenvironment, and have been used to study clinically relevant phenomena in the heart that include electrical stimulation, electrical propagation, arrhythmia and cell therapy.

    Research Areas: bioelectric systems, arrhythmia, cell therapy, cardiology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Leslie Tung, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

  • Guang William Wong Lab

    The Wong Lab seeks to understand mechanisms employed by cells and tissues to maintain metabolic homeostasis. We are currently addressing how adipose- and skeletal muscle-derived hormones (adipokines and myokines), discovered in our lab, regulate tissue crosstalk and signaling pathways to control energy metabolism. We use transgenic and knockout mouse models, as well as cell culture systems, to address the role of the CTRP family of hormones in physiological and disease states. We also aim to identify the receptors that mediate the biological functions of CTRPs.

    Research Areas: energy metabolism, insulin resistance, hormones, diabetes, metabolic homeostasis

    Principal Investigator

    Guang Wong, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Jeremy Nathans Laboratory

    The Jeremy Nathans Laboratory is focused on neural and vascular development, and the role of Frizzled receptors in mammalian development. We use gene manipulation in the mouse, cell culture models, and biochemical reconstitution to investigate the relevant molecular events underlying these processes, and to genetically mark and manipulate cells and tissues. Current experiments are aimed at defining additional Frizzled-regulated processes and elucidating the molecular mechanisms and cell biologic results of Frizzled signaling within these various contexts. Complementing these areas of biologic interest, we have ongoing technology development projects related to genetically manipulating and visualizing defined cell populations in the mouse, and quantitative analysis of mouse visual system function.

    Research Areas: vascular development, biochemistry, cell biology, neurodevelopment, genomics, Frizzled receptors, neuroscience

  • Neuromyelitis Optica Research Lab

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), also known as Devic's disease, is a neuroinflammatory disorder of the optic nerves and spinal cord. Our lab is focused on understanding the pathogenesis of NMO using animal models and cell culture techniques. Recent studies have found an antibody in NMO patients, the NMO-IgG disease, that binds aquaporin-4 (AQP4) found on astrocytes and other cell types.We are trying to understand the relationship of the NMO-IgG to the pathogenesis of NMO. We are also focused on understanding why NMO preferentially attacks the optic nerves and spinal cord. Toward this goal, we found that AQP4 isoforms are differentially expressed on astrocytes in these tissues compared to other tissues in the nervous system (see publications). Aquaporin-4 isoform expression may be critically important in predisposition to disease in NMO.

    Research Areas: neurofibromatosis

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Levy, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • Nicholas Zachos Lab

    Researchers in the Nicholas Zachos Lab work to understand variations in protein trafficking that occur during pathophysiological conditions that cause ion and water transport that result in diarrhea. We recently identified a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway responsible for elevated intracellular calcium-mediated inhibition of NHE3 activity in intestinal epithelial cells. We use advanced imaging techniques, including confocal and multi-photon microscopy, to characterize protein trafficking of intestinal transporters. We also perform functional assays using fluorescent probes (ratiometric and non-ratiometric) to measure ion transport in cell culture models, intact intestinal tissues and human small intestinal enteroids.

    Research Areas: imaging, protein trafficking, diarrhea, bioinformatics, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Nicholas Zachos, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Paul Talalay Laboratory

    The Paul Talalay Laboratory examines the molecular mechanisms involved in chemoprotection against cancer. The susceptibility of animals and their cells to the mutagenic and neoplastic effects of chemical carcinogens and reactive oxygen intermediates depends on the balance between the activities of enzymes involved in the metabolic activation and inactivation (detoxication) of these agents. The activities of these enzymes are regulated by a wide variety of chemical agents, and these modulations result in protection against cancer. We have developed animal and cell culture systems to analyze the molecular signals that regulate detoxication enzymes. With the help of these systems, we have identified and isolated from edible plants (e.g., vegetables) potent enzyme inducers. These minor dietary constituents block chemical carcinogenesis. We use biochemical, molecular and cell biological techniques to develop strategies for reducing the risk of developing cancer by identifying phytochemi...cal enzyme inducers in edible plants and evaluating their efficacy in cells, animals and humans. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, enzymes, moleculary biology, cell biology, chemoprotection, cancer

  • Ryuya Fukunaga Lab

    The Fukunaga Lab uses multidisciplinary approaches to understand the cell biology, biogenesis and function of small silencing RNAs from the atomic to the organismal level.

    The lab studies how small silencing RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), are produced and how they function. Mutations in the small RNA genes or in the genes involved in the RNA pathways cause many diseases, including cancers. We use a combination of biochemistry, biophysics, fly genetics, cell culture, X-ray crystallography and next-generation sequencing to answer fundamental biological questions and also potentially lead to therapeutic applications to human diseases.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology, cell culture, genomics, RNA

    Principal Investigator

    Ryuya Fukunaga, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

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