Find a Research Lab

Enter a research interest, principal investigator or keyword

Displaying 1 to 50 of 54 results for cardiovascular

Show: 10 · 20 · 50

  1. 1
  2. 2
  • Adrian Dobs Lab

    Researchers in the Adrian Dobs Lab study topics that include gonadal dysfunction, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and the relationship between sex hormones and heart disease. We currently are investigating male gonadal function—with particular interest in new forms of male hormone replacement therapy—and hormonal changes related to aging.

    Research Areas: diabetes mellitus, hormones, hyperlipidemia, male gonadal function, cardiovascular diseases, endocrinology

    Principal Investigator

    Adrian Dobs, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Allan Gelber Lab

    The Allan Gelber Lab conducts research on the clinical epidemiology of rheumatic disorders. Our recent studies have explored topics that include the predicting factors of prevalent and incident gout; cardiovascular disease burden and risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; autoantibodies in both primary and secondary SjogrenÕs syndrome; and predictors of outcomes in patients with scleroderma. In addition, we have a long-standing interest in the ways in which racial differences affect disease manifestations in relation to rheumatic disorders.

    Research Areas: rheumatology, gout, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, race, health disparities, rheumatoid arthritis

    Principal Investigator

    Allan Gelber, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ami Shah Lab

    Researchers in the Ami Shah Lab study scleroderma and Raynaud’s phenomenon. We examine the relationship between cancer and scleroderma, with a focus on how and if cancer causes scleroderma to develop in some patients. We are currently conducting clinical research to study ways to detect cardiopulmonary complications in patients with scleroderma, biological and imaging markers of Raynaud’s phenomenon, and drugs that improve aspects of scleroderma.

    Research Areas: Raynaud's phenomenon, cancer, scleroderma, drugs, cardiovascular diseases

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Ami Shah, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Anderson Lab

    Research in the Anderson laboratory focuses on cellular signaling and ionic mechanisms that cause heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, major public health problems worldwide. Primary focus is on the multifunctional Ca2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). The laboratory identified CaMKII as an important pro-arrhythmic and pro-cardiomyopathic signal, and its studies have provided proof of concept evidence motivating active efforts in biotech and the pharmaceutical industry to develop therapeutic CaMKII inhibitory drugs to treat heart failure and arrhythmias.

    Under physiological conditions, CaMKII is important for excitation-contraction coupling and fight or flight increases in heart rate. However, myocardial CaMKII is excessively activated during disease conditions where it contributes to loss of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, membrane hyperexcitability, premature cell death, and hypertrophic and inflammatory transcription. These downstream targets a...ppear to contribute coordinately and decisively to heart failure and arrhythmias. Recently, researchers developed evidence that CaMKII also participates in asthma.

    Efforts at the laboratory, funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, are highly collaborative and involve undergraduate assistants, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty. Key areas of focus are:
    • Ion channel biology and arrhythmias
    • Cardiac pacemaker physiology and disease
    • Molecular physiology of CaMKII
    • Myocardial and mitochondrial metabolism
    • CaMKII and reactive oxygen species in asthma

    Mark Anderson, MD, is the William Osler Professor of Medicine, the director of the Department of Medicine in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and physician-in-chief of The Johns Hopkins Hospital.
    view more

    Research Areas: heart failure, arrhythmia, cardiovascular diseases, sudden cardiac death

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Anderson, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Cheryl Dennison Himmelfarb Lab

    Research in the Cheryl Dennison Lab aims to improve cardiovascular care for high-risk groups through multidisciplinary and health information technology-based methods. Our studies focus on reducing system and provider obstacles to implementing cardiovascular guidelines in various health care environments. Additional research interests include chronic illness management, quality of care, interdisciplinary teamwork and provider behavior.

    Research Areas: cardiovascular diseases, quality of care, information technology, health disparities

  • Chulan Kwon Laboratory

    The C. Kwon Lab studies the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing heart generation and regeneration.

    The limited regenerative capacity of the heart is a major factor in morbidity and mortality rates: Heart malformation is the most frequent form of human birth defects, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiovascular progenitor cells hold tremendous therapeutic potential due to their unique ability to expand and differentiate into various heart cell types.

    Our laboratory seeks to understand the fundamental biology and regenerative potential of multi-potent cardiac progenitor cells – building blocks used to form the heart during fetal development — by deciphering the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control their induction, maintenance, and differentiation. We are also interested in elucidating the maturation event of heart muscle cells, an essential process to generate adult cardiomyocytes, which occurs after terminal differentiation ...of the progenitor cells. We believe this knowledge will contribute to our understanding of congenital and adult heart disease and be instrumental for stem cell-based heart regeneration.

    We have developed several novel approaches to deconstruct the mechanisms, including the use of animal models and pluripotent stem cell systems. We expect this knowledge will help us better understand heart disease and will be instrumental for stem-cell-based disease modeling and interventions for of heart repair.

    Dr. Chulan Kwon is an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University Heart and Vascular Institute.
    view more

    Research Areas: stem cells, cell biology, heart regeneration, congenital heart disease, cardiovascular, molecular biology, cardiac cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Chulan Kwon, M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Daniel Nyhan Lab

    The Daniel Nyhan Lab studies vascular changes that accompany aging to determine the underlying causes and find ways to reverse the process. One goal of our research is to identify the factors that cause vascular stiffness. Our hope is that our work in vascular biology will lead to new ways to improve vascular compliance and thereby improve cardiovascular function and perioperative risk.

    Research Areas: hypertension, cardiovascular, vascular biology, vascular diseases

  • Dara Kraitchman Laboratory

    The Dara Kraitchman Laboratory focuses on non-invasive imaging and minimally invasive treatment of cardiovascular disease. Our laboratory is actively involved in developing new methods to image myocardial function and perfusion using MRI. Current research interests are aimed at determining the optimal timing and method of the administration of mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate infarcted myocardium using non-invasive MR fluoroscopic delivery and imaging. MRI and radiolabeling techniques include novel MR and radiotracer stem cell labeling methods to determine the location, quantity and biodistribution of stem cells after delivery as well as to noninvasively determine the efficacy of these therapies in acute myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease.

    Our other research focuses on the development of new animal models of human disease for noninvasive imaging studies and the development of promising new therapies in clinical trials for companion animals.

    Research Areas: imaging, cardioavascular, radiology, MRI, cardiomyopathy

  • David Graham Lab

    The David Graham Lab studies the consequences of HIV interactions with the immune system, the resulting pathogenesis and how to sabotage these interactions. We apply advanced technologies like mass spectrometry to dissect processes at the molecular level. We are also actively involved in cardiovascular research and studies the ways proteins are organized into functional units in different cell types of the heart.

    Major projects in our lab are organized into three major areas: (1) H/SIV pathogenesis and neuropathogenesis, (2) Cardiovascular disease, and (3) High technology development

    Research Areas: immunology, mass spectrometry, HIV, cardiovascular, SIV, pathogenesis

    Principal Investigator

    David Graham, M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology

  • David Thompson Lab

    Researchers in the David Thompson Lab examine the outcomes of patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs), patient safety efforts, quality improvement efforts, and multidisciplinary teamwork and safety curriculum development. We're taking part in a study aimed at reducing hospital-acquired infections among cardiovascular surgery patients. Our investigators also participated in a clinical research collaboration that saw an 81 percent reduction in bloodstream infections related to central lines.

    Research Areas: medical education, patient safety, quality improvement, infections, patient outcomes, ICU

  • Dhananjay Vaidya Lab

    Research conducted in the Dhananjay Vaidya Lab focuses on the prevention of heart disease, with special emphasis on cardiometabolic risk factors, genetics in high-risk families, cardiovascular epidemiology, statistics and vascular biology. We also provide consultation on study design as well as plan and oversee data analyses for projects supported by the Center for Child and Community Health Research.

    Research Areas: heart disease, epidemiology, data analysis, cardiometabolic risk factors, statistics, study design, cardiovascular, genomics, vascular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Jay Vaidya, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Eliseo Guallar Lab

    Research in the Eliseo Guallar Lab focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We have a special interest in the roles played by mercury, arsenic, lead and cadmium in cardiovascular disease development. Our methodological interests include determining threshold effects in epidemiological studies and applying statistical methods to epidemiological problem-solving.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, cardiovascular diseases, heavy metals

    Principal Investigator

    Eliseo Guallar, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Elizabeth Selvin Lab

    The Elizabeth Selvin Lab examines the intersection of epidemiology, clinical policy and public health policy. One of our key goals is to use the findings of epidemiologic research to inform the screening, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease. Much of our work looks at biomarkers and diagnostics related to diabetes and diabetes complications. Our findings — linking hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to diabetic complications and identifying the role of A1c in diabetes diagnosis — have influenced clinical practice guidelines.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, biomarkers, kidney diseases, obesity, diabetes, health care policy, cardiovascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Elizabeth Selvin, M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ernesto Freire Laboratory

    The Ernesto Freire Lab studies the use of novel drugs to treat disease. Our research has resulted in the development of a thermodynamic platform for drug discovery and optimization. Our aim is to achieve high binding affinity and selectivity as well as appropriate pharmacokinetics with the platform. We are currently focusing on drug targets such as HIV/-1 protease inhibitors (HIV/AIDS), plasmepsin inhibitors (malaria), HCV protease inhibitors (hepatitis C), coronavirus 3CL-pro protease inhibitors (SARS and other viral infections), HIV-1 gp120 inhibitors (HIV/AIDS), chymase inhibitors (cardiovascular disease) and beta lactamase inhibitors (antibiotic resistance).

    Research Areas: pharmaceuticals, thermodynamics, AIDS, drug discovery, HIV, protease inhibitors, malaria

  • Foster Lab

    The Foster Lab uses the tools of protein biochemistry and proteomics to tackle fundamental problems in the fields of cardiac preconditioning and heart failure. Protein networks are perturbed in heart disease in a manner that correlates only weakly with changes in mRNA transcripts. Moreover, proteomic techniques afford the systematic assessment of post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of proteins responsible for every aspect of heart function from electrical excitation to contraction and metabolism. Understanding the status of protein networks in the diseased state is, therefore, key to discovering new therapies.

    D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, and serves as Director of the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


    Research Areas: proteomics, protein biochemistry, heart failure, cardiology, cardiac preconditioning, cardiomyopathy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    D. Brian Foster, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Gail Daumit Lab

    Research in the Gail Daumit Lab is devoted to improving overall health and decreasing premature mortality for people with serious mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We have conducted observational studies to determine and convey the burden of physical health problems in this vulnerable population, and are currently leading a randomized trial funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to test a comprehensive cardiovascular risk reduction program in people with serious mental illness.

    Research Areas: mental health, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, cardiovascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Gail Daumit, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Hsin-Chieh Yeh Lab

    Work in the Hsin-Chieh Yeh Lab focuses on clinical trials and cohort studies of diabetes, obesity and behavioral intervention, cancer and hypertension. Recent investigations have focused on novel risk factors and complications related to obesity and type 2 diabetes, particularly lung function, smoking and cancer. We recently co-led a randomized clinical trial of tailored dietary advice for consumption of dietary supplements to lower blood pressure and improve cardiovascular disease risk factors in hypertensive urban African Americans.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, African Americans, cancer, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, behavioral medicine

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Hsin-Chieh Yeh, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Interventional Cardiology Research Group

    Our group is interested in a broad array of clinical and translational investigations spanning the evaluation of basic pathophysiology in patients undergoing cardiac procedures, development and evaluation of new therapeutic strategies, and improving patient selection and outcomes following interventional procedures. We are comprised of a core group of faculty and dedicated research nurses as well as fellows, residents, and students. Projects range from investigator-initiated single-center observational studies to industry-sponsored multicenter phase 3 randomized controlled trials. We have established a database of all patients who have undergone TAVR at Johns Hopkins, which is providing the basis for several retrospective analyses and will serve as the foundation for future studies of TAVR. We are also engaged in collaborative projects with other groups from the Department of Medicine and other Departments including Cardiac Surgery, Anesthesiology, Radiology, Psychiatry, and Biomedical... Engineering. Members of our group are actively involved with the Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design (CBID) in the development of novel minimally-invasive cardiovascular devices. view less

    Research Areas: coronary CT angiography, PCI, bioprosthetic leaflet thrombosis, myocardial regeneration, TAVR

    Principal Investigator

    Jon Resar, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • J. Hunter Young Lab

    Research in the J. Hunter Young Lab focuses on the genetic epidemiology and physiology of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, especially hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Current activities include an observational study of hypertension among African Americans; a genetic epidemiology study of worldwide cardiovascular disease susceptibility patterns; and several population-based observational studies of cardiovascular and renal disease. A recent focus group study found that changes in housing and city policies might lead to improved environmental health conditions for public housing residents.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, kidney diseases, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, genomics, physiology, cardiovascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Jeffery Young, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jochen Steppan Lab

    Research in the Jochen Steppan Lab primarily focused on vascular stiffness related to aging. We are currently researching LOXL2 (lysine-oxidase-like-2), which might be intimately involved in the development or progression of vascular stiffness. We aim to better understand LOXL2's role in the vasculature and hope that this work leads to the characterization of a novel therapeutic target. This is important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases in the aging population.

    Research Areas: aging, vascular stiffness, cardiovascular diseases

  • Josef Coresh Lab

    Research in the Josef Coresh Lab focuses on cardiovascular epidemiology, kidney disease and genetic epidemiology. Our team uses innovative methods to quantify disease burden and consequences in the population; studies the causes and consequences of vascular disease in the heart, kidneys and brain; and works to develop a strong scientific basis for quantifying the burden, causes and consequences of kidney disease. Working in collaboration with leading laboratories and specialists, we also aim to quantify the interplay of genes and environment in health and disease.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, genetics, kidney diseases, cardiovascular, vascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Josef Coresh, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kathleen Gabrielson Laboratory

    Research in the Kathleen Gabrielson Laboratory focuses on the signal transduction of cardiovascular toxicities in vitro, in cardiomyocyte culture and in vivo using rodent models. Specifically, the research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of various cancer therapies that induce cardiac toxicities.

    Currently, we are testing prevention strategies for these toxicities by studying the cardiac effects of the anthracycline doxorubicin (adriamycin) and the immunotherapeutic agent, Herceptin, anti-erbB2. We are focusing on the signal transduction pathways in the heart that are modulated by anti-erbB2 treatment, which in turn, worsens doxorubicin toxicity. Thus, understanding the mechanisms behind the combined toxicity of doxorubicin and anti-erbB2 will pave the way for the design of strategies to reduce toxicity, identify patients at risk and potentially allow higher levels of this effective combination therapy to be used with an improved long-term survival in patients.

    Research Areas: cardiovascular toxicity, cancer, pathology, signal transduction

    Principal Investigator

    Kathleen Gabrielson, D.V.M., Ph.D.

    Department

    Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology

  • Lakshmi Santhanam Lab

    Investigators in the Lakshmi Santhanam Lab examine the fundamental mechanisms behind cardiovascular disease. They are particularly interested in better understanding how nitric oxide-mediated S-nitrosylation (a post-translational protein modification) impacts protein function and trafficking in the vasculature as well as how this relationship influences matrix remodeling and vascular stiffening.

    Research Areas: vasculature trafficking, protein trafficking, S-nitrosation, protein function, nitric oxide, matrix remodeling, vascular stiffness, cardiovascular diseases

  • Lee Bone Lab

    Research in the Lee Bone Lab uses community-based participatory approaches to promote health in underserved urban African-American populations. We conduct randomized clinical trials on cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer detection and control in order to test the success of community interventions. We focus in particular on making interventions sustainable and on implementing electronic education to improve communication.

    Research Areas: African Americans, cancer, diabetes, community outreach, cardiovascular diseases, community health education

    Principal Investigator

    Lee Bone, M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Lewis Romer Lab

    Work in the Lewis Romer Lab focuses on the responses of vascular systems to disease and injury. Using cultured human endothelial cells and fibroblasts from mice that lack expression of the FAK- or Src-family kinases, we’re exploring several topics. These include the effect of inflammatory cytokine on cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix; the role of FAK signaling in inhibiting apoptosis; and the function of FAK- and Src-family kinases in cell-matrix interactions during adhesion and motility.

    Research Areas: microscopy, cellular biology, vascular biology, cardiovascular diseases

  • Lima Lab

    The Lima Lab’s research is concentrated on the development and application of imaging and technology to address scientific and clinical problems involving the heart and vascular system.

    Specifically, our research is focused on developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast techniques to investigate microvascular function in patients and experimental animals with myocardial infarction; functional reserve secondary to dobutamine stimulation and myocardial viability assessed by sodium imaging; and cardiac MRI and computed tomography (CT) program development of techniques to characterize atherosclerosis in humans with cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease.

    Current projects include:
    • The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
    • The MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) Study
    • The Coronary Artery Evaluation using 64-row Multidetector Computed Tomography Angiography (CORE64) Study

    Joao Lima, MD, is a professor of medicine, radiology and... epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. view more

    Research Areas: magnetic resonance, cerebrovascular, imaging, cardiovascular, cardiology, atherosclerosis, computed tomography, vascular, myocardial infarction

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Joao Lima, M.B.A., M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Lisa Cooper Lab

    The Lisa Cooper Lab is dedicated to researching patient-centered interventions for improving health outcomes and overcoming racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Our primary focus is on the factors of physician communication skills and cultural competence training, patient shared decision-making and self-management skills training. Recently, we have explored patient-centered depression care for African Americans, tactics for improving patient-physician communication about management of hypertension, and reducing ethnic and social disparities in health. In addition, we are currently researching racial disparities in cardiovascular health outcomes for patients living in Baltimore.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, patient-centered health care, patient-provider relationships, hypertension, race, health services research, cultural competence, health disparities

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Lisa Cooper, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Lisa Yanek Lab

    Research in the Lisa Yanek Lab focuses on cardiovascular disease in families and risk factor modification. Recently, we conducted a study to determine the association of lean versus fat mass with fitness in healthy, overweight and obese African Americans from families with early-onset coronary disease.

    Research Areas: African Americans, cardiovascular diseases, risk factor modification

    Principal Investigator

    Lisa Yanek, M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Mariana Lazo Lab

    The Mariana Lazo Lab studies the epidemiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes and obesity in adults. We also study the effects of moderate alcohol consumption on liver and cardiovascular diseases.

    Research Areas: fatty liver disease, epidemiology, alcohol, alcohol use, obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, liver diseases

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mariana Lazo, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.M.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Maryam Jahromi Lab

    The Maryam Jahromi Lab researches infectious diseases such as influenza, tuberculosis, endocarditis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, brucellosis, Clostridium difficile and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. We are particularly interested in the impact of the influenza vaccine on systemic inflammation. Recent areas of focus include the relationship between influenza vaccination and cardiovascular outcomes, the emergence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran, and prospects for vaccines and therapies for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    Research Areas: vaccines, infectious disease, patient outcomes, inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, flu, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

    Principal Investigator

    Maryam Keshtkar Jahromi, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Michael Klag Lab

    The Michael Klag Lab focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of kidney disease, cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Our research determined that the U.S. was experiencing an epidemic of end-stage kidney disease, pinpointed the incidence of kidney disease and published scholarship on risk factors for kidney disease such as race, diabetes and socioeconomic status. Our Precursors Study has shown that serum cholesterol measured at age 22 years is a predictor for midlife cardiovascular disease, a finding that has influenced policy about cholesterol screening in young adults. We also research health behaviors that lead to hypertension and study how differences in these behaviors affect urban and non-urban populations.

    Research Areas: longitudinal data, kidney diseases, health behaviors, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, cholesterol

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Klag, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Naresh Punjabi Lab

    The Naresh Punjabi Lab primarily studies sleep apnea, epidemiology, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Our current research focuses on the epidemiology of sleep apnea with a particular emphasis on associated sequelae, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. We have been part of the multi-center Sleep Heart Health Study, an epidemiological study on the longitudinal effects of sleep apnea on hypertension, cardiovascular disease and mortality. Our lab is examining the independent effects of intermittent hypoxia on various pathways to help elucidate the links between sleep apnea, insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, sleep apnea

    Principal Investigator

    Naresh Punjabi, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Nauder Faraday Lab

    The Nauder Faraday Lab investigates topics within perioperative genetic and molecular medicine. We explore thrombotic, bleeding and infectious surgical complications. Our goal is to uncover the molecular determinants of outcome in surgical patients, which will enable surgeons to better personalize a patient’s care in the perioperative period. Our team is funded by the National Institutes of Health to research platelet phenotypes, the pharmacogenomics of antiplatelet agents for preventing cardiovascular disease, and the genotypic determinants of aspirin response in high-risk families.

    Research Areas: cardiac surgery, molecular medicine, post-surgical outcomes, genomics, cardiovascular diseases, post-surgery complications

  • Nicholas Flavahan Lab

    The Nicholas Flavahan Lab primarily researches the cellular interactions and subcellular signaling pathways that control normal vascular function and regulate the initiation of vascular disease. We use biochemical and molecular analyses of cellular mediators and cell signaling mechanisms in cultured vascular cells, while also conducting physiological assessments and fluorescent microscopic imaging of signaling systems in isolated blood vessels. A major component of our research involves aterioles, tiny blood vessles that are responsible for controlling the peripheral resistance of the cardiovascular system, which help determine organ blood flow.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, Raynaud's phenomenon, vascular biology, vasospasms

  • Nicola Heller Lab

    Research in the Nicola Heller Lab focuses on the immunobiology of macrophages. Our team explores how these cells impact diseases with an inflammatory element, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity. Using a variety of techniques, including molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, mouse models and more, we study the role of IL-4/IL-13 signaling in asthma and allergic disease, as well as the role of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. Currently, we are researching the links between asthma and obesity, with a focus on the roles of gender and race.

    Research Areas: asthma, allergies, immunobiology, inflammation, macrophages

  • O'Rourke Lab

    The O’Rourke Lab uses an integrated approach to study the biophysics and physiology of cardiac cells in normal and diseased states.

    Research in our lab has incorporated mitochondrial energetics, Ca2+ dynamics, and electrophysiology to provide tools for studying how defective function of one component of the cell can lead to catastrophic effects on whole cell and whole organ function. By understanding the links between Ca2+, electrical excitability and energy production, we hope to understand the cellular basis of cardiac arrhythmias, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and sudden death.

    We use state-of-the-art techniques, including single-channel and whole-cell patch clamp, microfluorimetry, conventional and two-photon fluorescence imaging, and molecular biology to study the structure and function of single proteins to the intact muscle. Experimental results are compared with simulations of computational models in order to understand the findings in the context of the system as a whole....

    Ongoing studies in our lab are focused on identifying the specific molecular targets modified by oxidative or ischemic stress and how they affect mitochondrial and whole heart function.

    The motivation for all of the work is to understand
    • how the molecular details of the heart cell work together to maintain function and
    • how the synchronization of the parts can go wrong

    Rational strategies can then be devised to correct dysfunction during the progression of disease through a comprehensive understanding of basic mechanisms.

    Brian O’Rourke, PhD, is a professor in the Division of Cardiology and Vice Chair of Basic and Translational Research, Department of Medicine, at the Johns Hopkins University.
    view more

    Research Areas: biophysics, ischemia-reperfusion injury, imaging, electrophysiology, cardiovascular, arrhythmia, physiology, sudden cardiac death, molecular biology, cardiac cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Brian O'Rourke, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Paul Ladenson Lab

    The Paul Ladenson Lab studies the application of thyroid hormone analogues for treating cardiovascular disease; novel approaches to thyroid cancer diagnosis and management; and the health economic analyses related to thyroid patient care.

    Research Areas: thyroid cancer, cardiovascular diseases, endocrinology

    Principal Investigator

    Paul Ladenson, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Platelet Physiology Research Lab

    Dr. Williams' research focuses on platelet physiology particularly as it relates to acute coronary syndromes and depression. Her laboratory specifically examines platelet aggregation, flow cytometric analysis to measure platelet activation, platelet luminescence as a measure of the platelet release reaction, many Elisa preparations in order to measure platelet function, platelet genotyping to determine the presence of certain platelet polymorphisms, and various other assays to distinguish mechanisms of platelet dysfunction. The goal for her cardiovascular platelet laboratory is to identify the etiology of platelet dysfunction in many disease states and apply methods that may improve this dysfunction that can eventually be translated to therapies for patients with cardiovascular disease. Scientific techniques performed in the lab include: flow cytometric analysis, platelet microparticle identification, and protein immunoprecipitation among other techniques.

    Research Areas: platelets, Platelet drug response, Platelet Flow cytometric analysis, Platelet Aggregation

    Principal Investigator

    Marlene Williams, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Pluznick Lab

    The Pluznick Lab is interested in the role that chemosensation plays in regulating physiological processes, particularly in the kidney and the cardiovascular system. We have found that sensory receptors (olfactory receptors, taste receptors, and other G-protein coupled receptors) are expressed in the kidney and in blood vessels, and that individual receptors play functional roles in whole-animal physiology. We are currently working to identify the full complement of sensory receptors found in the kidney, and are working to understand the role that each receptor plays in whole-animal physiology by using a variety of in vitro (receptor localization, ligand screening) and in vivo (whole-animal physiology) techniques.

    Research Areas: sensory receptors, cardiovascular, physiology, chemosensation, renal

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jennifer Pluznick, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Post Lab

    The Post Lab is involved in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a collaborative study of the characteristics of subclinical cardiovascular disease (that is, disease detected non-invasively before it has produced clinical signs and symptoms) and the risk factors that predict progression to clinically overt cardiovascular disease or progression of the subclinical disease.

    As MESA researchers, we study a diverse, population-based sample of 6,814 asymptomatic men and women aged 45-84. Approximately 38 percent of the recruited participants are white, 28 percent African-American, 22 percent Hispanic, and 12 percent Asian, predominantly of Chinese descent.

    Participants were recruited from six field centers across the United States, including Johns Hopkins University. Each participant received an extensive physical exam to determine a number of conditions, including coronary calcification, ventricular mass and function, flow-mediated endothelial vasodilation, standard coron...ary risk factors, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors, and psychosocial factors.

    Selected repetition of subclinical disease measures and risk factors at follow-up visits have allowed study of the progression of disease. Participants are being followed for identification and characterization of cardiovascular disease events, including acute myocardial infarction and other forms of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and congestive heart failure; for cardiovascular disease interventions; and for mortality.

    Wendy S. Post, MD, MS, is an associate faculty, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins University, and a professor of medicine.
    view less

    Research Areas: coronary artery disease, cardiovascular, ethnicity, pathogenesis, atherosclerosis, sudden cardiac death

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Wendy Post, M.D., M.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ratchford Lab

    Prospective registry looking at cardiovascular risk assessment and risk reduction among firefighters.

    Research Areas: Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Principal Investigator

    Elizabeth Ratchford, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Rita Kalyani Lab

    Research in the Rita Kalyani Lab examines the decreased physical functioning observed in patients with diabetes as they age. Through several ongoing epidemiological cohorts, we are investigating the association of high blood glucose and high insulin levels with accelerated muscle loss, and possible contributions to the physical disability observed in diabetes. We are currently involved in clinical studies that aim to understand the underlying mechanisms for these associations and to facilitate the development of novel strategies to prevent muscle loss and disability in people with diabetes.

    Research Areas: metabolism, insulin, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, endocrinology, blood glucose

    Principal Investigator

    Rita Kalyani, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sandra Gabelli Lab

    The Gabelli lab research is focused on structural, mechanistic and functional aspects of enzyme activation that play a role in the biology of human diseases such as cancer, parasitic infection and cardiovascular disease. Their work seeks to:

    1. Understand how molecular events at the recognition level coordinate and trigger events in the cells
    2. Translate structural and mechanistic information on protein:protein interactions at the cytoplasmic level into preventive and therapeutic treatment for human disease.

    To achieve a comprehensive understanding, they are studying cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions involved in regulation of pathways such as PI3K and Sodium Voltage gated channels. Their research integrates structural biology and chemical biology and it is focused on drug discovery for targeted therapies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, chemical biology, cell biology, structural biology, proteomics, cancer, diarrhea, diabetes, drugs, cellular signaling, inflammation, pharmacology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Sandra Gabelli, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sharon Turban Lab

    Research in the Sharon Turban Lab focuses on the effects of sodium and potassium on blood pressure and on kidney function. We lead the Chronic Kidney Disease-Potassium (CKD-K) clinical trial, funded by American Heart Association, which examines the benefits and safety of two levels of potassium intake in patients with kidney disease. Other research includes the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, which aims to improve the understanding of chronic kidney disease and related cardiovascular illness.

    Research Areas: sodium, kidney diseases, potassium, chronic kidney disease, blood pressure

    Principal Investigator

    Sharon Turban, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sherita Golden Lab

    Research in the Sherita Golden Lab focuses on identifying endocrine risk factors associated with the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We conduct our research by incorporating measures of hormonal function into the design of clinical trials of cardiovascular risk modification, observational studies of incident cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and studies evaluating diabetic complications.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, stress, hormones, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, endocrinology

    Principal Investigator

    Sherita Golden, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sleep Apnea Pathogenesis

    Our research laboratory is staffed by a dedicated and experienced team of sleep scientists, fellows, technicians, engineers, and students. Currently, we are focused on the following areas:

    -Novel treatments for sleep apnea using electrical and nerve stimulation and chemogenetic techniques

    -Cardiovascular and metabolic effects of sleep apnea and hypoxia

    -Leptin and its impact on breathing and cardiovascular physiology

    -Sleep disordered breathing at high altitude

    -Dietary impacts on asthma

    Research Areas: hypoxia, sleep apnea

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Vsevolod Polotsky, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Steven Beaudry Lab

    Research in the Steven Beaudry Lab aims to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind cardiovascular disease in pregnancy. Our goal is to develop more effective treatments and improve patient outcomes.

    Research Areas: cell biology, cardiovascular diseases, pregnancy, molecular biology

  • Systems Biology Laboratory

    The Systems Biology Lab applies methods of multiscale modeling to problems of cancer and cardiovascular disease, and examines the systems biology of angiogenesis, breast cancer and peripheral artery disease (PAD).

    Using coordinated computational and experimental approaches, the lab studies the mechanisms of breast cancer tumor growth and metastasis to find ways to inhibit those processes.

    We use bioinformatics to discover novel agents that affect angiogenesis and perform in vitro and in vivo experiments to test these predictions. In addition we study protein networks that determine processes of angiogenesis, arteriogenesis and inflammation in PAD. The lab also investigates drug repurposing for potential applications as stimulators of therapeutic angiogenesis, examines signal transduction pathways and builds 3D models of angiogenesis.

    The lab has discovered over a hundred novel anti-angiogenic peptides, and has undertaken in vitro and in vivo studies testing their activity unde...r different conditions. We have investigated structure-activity relationship (SAR) doing point mutations and amino acid substitutions and constructed biomimetic peptides derived from their endogenous progenitors. They have demonstrated the efficacy of selected peptides in mouse models of breast, lung and brain cancers, and in age-related macular degeneration.

    view more

    Research Areas: peripheral artery disease, breast cancer, systems biology, computational biology, cancer, cardiovascular, age-related macular degeneration, bioinformatics, angiogenesis, microcirculation

    Principal Investigator

    Aleksander Popel, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

  • The Arking Lab

    The Arking Lab studies the genomics of complex human disease, with the primary goal of identifying and characterizing genetics variants that modify risk for human disease. The group has pioneered the use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which allow for an unbiased screen of virtually all common genetic variants in the genome. The lab is currently developing improved GWAS methodology, as well as exploring the integration of additional genome level data (RNA expression, DNA methylation, protein expression) to improve the power to identify specific genetic influences of disease.

    The Arking Lab is actively involved in researching:
    • autism, a childhood neuropsychiatric disorder
    cardiovascular genomics, with a focus on electrophysiology and sudden cardiac death (SCD)
    • electrophysiology is the study of the flow of ions in biological tissues

    Dan E. Arking, PhD, is an associate professor at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine and Department of Medicine, D...ivision of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University. view more

    Research Areas: autism, genetics, aging, cardiovascular diseases, sudden cardiac death

    Principal Investigator

    Dan Arking, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • The Atlantic Cardiovascular Patient Outcomes Research Team - Atlantic C-PORT

    Our research is centered on the safety, efficacy and outcomes of PCI performed at hospitals without on-site cardiac surgery.

    Active projects:

    C-PORT Randomized Studies and Registries; New Jersey Angioplasty Demonstration Project; InCar-decision support tools for performance of PCI at hospitals without on-site cardiac surgery.

    For more information please visit Cport.org.

    Research Areas: cardiac surgery, cardiology

    Principal Investigator

    Thomas Aversano, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  1. 1
  2. 2