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Displaying 1 to 10 of 26 results for cardiovascular diseases

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  • Adrian Dobs Lab

    Researchers in the Adrian Dobs Lab study topics that include gonadal dysfunction, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and the relationship between sex hormones and heart disease. We currently are investigating male gonadal function—with particular interest in new forms of male hormone replacement therapy—and hormonal changes related to aging.

    Research Areas: diabetes mellitus, hormones, hyperlipidemia, male gonadal function, cardiovascular diseases, endocrinology

    Principal Investigator

    Adrian Dobs, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ami Shah Lab

    Researchers in the Ami Shah Lab study scleroderma and Raynaud’s phenomenon. We examine the relationship between cancer and scleroderma, with a focus on how and if cancer causes scleroderma to develop in some patients. We are currently conducting clinical research to study ways to detect cardiopulmonary complications in patients with scleroderma, biological and imaging markers of Raynaud’s phenomenon, and drugs that improve aspects of scleroderma.

    Research Areas: Raynaud's phenomenon, cancer, scleroderma, drugs, cardiovascular diseases

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Ami Shah, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Anderson Lab

    Research in the Anderson laboratory focuses on cellular signaling and ionic mechanisms that cause heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, major public health problems worldwide. Primary focus is on the multifunctional Ca2+ and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). The laboratory identified CaMKII as an important pro-arrhythmic and pro-cardiomyopathic signal, and its studies have provided proof of concept evidence motivating active efforts in biotech and the pharmaceutical industry to develop therapeutic CaMKII inhibitory drugs to treat heart failure and arrhythmias.

    Under physiological conditions, CaMKII is important for excitation-contraction coupling and fight or flight increases in heart rate. However, myocardial CaMKII is excessively activated during disease conditions where it contributes to loss of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, membrane hyperexcitability, premature cell death, and hypertrophic and inflammatory transcription. These downstream targets a...ppear to contribute coordinately and decisively to heart failure and arrhythmias. Recently, researchers developed evidence that CaMKII also participates in asthma.

    Efforts at the laboratory, funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, are highly collaborative and involve undergraduate assistants, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty. Key areas of focus are:
    • Ion channel biology and arrhythmias
    • Cardiac pacemaker physiology and disease
    • Molecular physiology of CaMKII
    • Myocardial and mitochondrial metabolism
    • CaMKII and reactive oxygen species in asthma

    Mark Anderson, MD, is the William Osler Professor of Medicine, the director of the Department of Medicine in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and physician-in-chief of The Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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    Research Areas: heart failure, arrhythmia, cardiovascular diseases, sudden cardiac death

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Mark Anderson, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Cheryl Dennison Himmelfarb Lab

    Research in the Cheryl Dennison Lab aims to improve cardiovascular care for high-risk groups through multidisciplinary and health information technology-based methods. Our studies focus on reducing system and provider obstacles to implementing cardiovascular guidelines in various health care environments. Additional research interests include chronic illness management, quality of care, interdisciplinary teamwork and provider behavior.

    Research Areas: cardiovascular diseases, quality of care, information technology, health disparities

  • Eliseo Guallar Lab

    Research in the Eliseo Guallar Lab focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We have a special interest in the roles played by mercury, arsenic, lead and cadmium in cardiovascular disease development. Our methodological interests include determining threshold effects in epidemiological studies and applying statistical methods to epidemiological problem-solving.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, cardiovascular diseases, heavy metals

    Principal Investigator

    Eliseo Guallar, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Elizabeth Selvin Lab

    The Elizabeth Selvin Lab examines the intersection of epidemiology, clinical policy and public health policy. One of our key goals is to use the findings of epidemiologic research to inform the screening, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease. Much of our work looks at biomarkers and diagnostics related to diabetes and diabetes complications. Our findings — linking hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to diabetic complications and identifying the role of A1c in diabetes diagnosis — have influenced clinical practice guidelines.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, biomarkers, kidney diseases, obesity, diabetes, health care policy, cardiovascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Elizabeth Selvin, M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Gail Daumit Lab

    Research in the Gail Daumit Lab is devoted to improving overall health and decreasing premature mortality for people with serious mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We have conducted observational studies to determine and convey the burden of physical health problems in this vulnerable population, and are currently leading a randomized trial funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to test a comprehensive cardiovascular risk reduction program in people with serious mental illness.

    Research Areas: mental health, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, cardiovascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Gail Daumit, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • J. Hunter Young Lab

    Research in the J. Hunter Young Lab focuses on the genetic epidemiology and physiology of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, especially hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Current activities include an observational study of hypertension among African Americans; a genetic epidemiology study of worldwide cardiovascular disease susceptibility patterns; and several population-based observational studies of cardiovascular and renal disease. A recent focus group study found that changes in housing and city policies might lead to improved environmental health conditions for public housing residents.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, kidney diseases, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, genomics, physiology, cardiovascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Jeffery Young, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jochen Steppan Lab

    Research in the Jochen Steppan Lab primarily focused on vascular stiffness related to aging. We are currently researching LOXL2 (lysine-oxidase-like-2), which might be intimately involved in the development or progression of vascular stiffness. We aim to better understand LOXL2's role in the vasculature and hope that this work leads to the characterization of a novel therapeutic target. This is important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases in the aging population.

    Research Areas: aging, vascular stiffness, cardiovascular diseases

  • Lakshmi Santhanam Lab

    Investigators in the Lakshmi Santhanam Lab examine the fundamental mechanisms behind cardiovascular disease. They are particularly interested in better understanding how nitric oxide-mediated S-nitrosylation (a post-translational protein modification) impacts protein function and trafficking in the vasculature as well as how this relationship influences matrix remodeling and vascular stiffening.

    Research Areas: vasculature trafficking, protein trafficking, S-nitrosation, protein function, nitric oxide, matrix remodeling, vascular stiffness, cardiovascular diseases

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