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Displaying 51 to 100 of 123 results for cancer

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  • Inoue Lab

    Complexity in signaling networks is often derived from co-opting one set of molecules for multiple operations. Understanding how cells achieve such sophisticated processing using a finite set of molecules within a confined space--what we call the "signaling paradox"--is critical to biology and engineering as well as the emerging field of synthetic biology.

    In the Inoue Lab, we have recently developed a series of chemical-molecular tools that allow for inducible, quick-onset and specific perturbation of various signaling molecules. Using this novel technique in conjunction with fluorescence imaging, microfabricated devices, quantitative analysis and computational modeling, we are dissecting intricate signaling networks.

    In particular, we investigate positive-feedback mechanisms underlying the initiation of neutrophil chemotaxis (known as symmetry breaking), as well as spatio-temporally compartmentalized signaling of Ras and membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides. In parallel,... we also try to understand how cell morphology affects biochemical pathways inside cells. Ultimately, we will generate completely orthogonal machinery in cells to achieve existing, as well as novel, cellular functions. Our synthetic, multidisciplinary approach will elucidate the signaling paradox created by nature. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, signaling paradox, signaling networks, molecular biology, synthetic biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Takanari Inoue, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Institute for Computational Medicine

    The Institute for Computational Medicine's mission is to develop quantitative approaches for understanding the mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of human disease through biological systems modeling, computational anatomy, and bioinformatics. Our disease focus areas include breast cancer, brain disease and heart disease.

    The institute builds on groundbreaking research at both the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering and the School of Medicine.

    Research Areas: breast cancer, systems biology, brain, biomedical engineering, cardiology, bioinformatics, computational anatomy

  • In-vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center

    The In-vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center conducts multidisciplinary research on cellular and molecular imaging related to cancer. We provide resources, such as consultation on biostatistics and bioinformatics and optical imaging and probe development, to understand and effectively treat cancer. Our molecular oncology experts consult on preclinical studies, use of human tissues, interpretation of data and molecular characterization of cells and tumor tissue.

    Research Areas: optical imaging, molecular characterization of tumor tissue, bioinformatics, molecular oncology, biostatistics, probe development, molecular characterization of cells, cancer imaging

  • Ivan Borrello Lab

    The Ivan Borrello Lab focuses on the development of a novel approach of adoptive T cell therapy utilizing marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs) as a more tumor-specific T cell approach. This has led to establishing the first adoptive T cell trials at Johns Hopkins and an exploration of this approach in other diseases, including nonhematologic malignancies. The lab also examines strategies for treating minimal residual disease (MRD) in myeloma with the combination of immune modulation and whole cell-based vaccines.

    Research Areas: immunology, vaccines, multiple myeloma, cancer, translational research, immunotherapy, T cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Ivan Borrello, M.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • J. Marie Hardwick Laboratory

    Our research is focused on understanding the basic mechanisms of programmed cell death in disease pathogenesis. Billions of cells die per day in the human body. Like cell division and differentiation, cell death is also critical for normal development and maintenance of healthy tissues. Apoptosis and other forms of cell death are required for trimming excess, expired and damaged cells. Therefore, many genetically programmed cell suicide pathways have evolved to promote long-term survival of species from yeast to humans. Defective cell death programs cause disease states. Insufficient cell death underlies human cancer and autoimmune disease, while excessive cell death underlies human neurological disorders and aging. Of particular interest to our group are the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 family proteins and other factors regulate programmed cell death, particularly in the nervous system, in cancer and in virus infections. Interestingly, cell death regulators also regulate many other cel...lular processes prior to a death stimulus, including neuronal activity, mitochondrial dynamics and energetics. We study these unknown mechanisms.

    We have reported that many insults can trigger cells to activate a cellular death pathway (Nature, 361:739-742, 1993), that several viruses encode proteins to block attempted cell suicide (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 94: 690-694, 1997), that cellular anti-death genes can alter the pathogenesis of virus infections (Nature Med. 5:832-835, 1999) and of genetic diseases (PNAS. 97:13312-7, 2000) reflective of many human disorders. We have shown that anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins can be converted into killer molecules (Science 278:1966-8, 1997), that Bcl-2 family proteins interact with regulators of caspases and regulators of cell cycle check point activation (Molecular Cell 6:31-40, 2000). In addition, Bcl-2 family proteins have normal physiological roles in regulating mitochondrial fission/fusion and mitochondrial energetics to facilitate neuronal activity in healthy brains.
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    Research Areas: cell death

  • James Hamilton Lab

    The main research interests of the James Hamilton Lab are the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and the development of molecular markers to help diagnose and manage cancer of the liver. In addition, we are investigating biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and response to various treatment modalities. Results of this study will provide a molecular classification of HCC and allow us to identify targets for chemoprevention and treatment. Specifically, we extract genomic DNA and total RNA from liver tissues and use this genetic material for methylation-specific PCR (MSP), cDNA microarray, microRNA microarray and genomic DNA methylation array experiments.

    Research Areas: cancer, molecular genetics, genomics, pathogenesis, liver diseases, hepatocellular carcinoma

    Principal Investigator

    James Hamilton, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jeff Bulte Lab

    The clinical development of novel immune and stem cell therapies calls for suitable methods that can follow the fate of cells non-invasively in humans at high resolution. The Bulte Lab has pioneered methods to label cells magnetically (using tiny superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles) in order to make them visible by MR imaging.

    While the lab is doing basic bench-type research, there is a strong interaction with the clinical interventional radiology and oncology groups in order to bring the methodologies into the clinic.

    Research Areas: immunology, stem cells, cancer, MRI, interventional radiology

  • Joel Pomerantz Laboratory

    The Pomerantz Laboratory studies the molecular machinery used by cells to interpret extracellular signals and transduce them to the nucleus to affect changes in gene expression. The accurate response to extracellular signals results in a cell's decision to proliferate, differentiate or die, and it's critical for normal development and physiology. The dysregulation of this machinery underlies the unwarranted expansion or destruction of cell numbers that occurs in human diseases like cancer, autoimmunity, hyperinflammatory states and neurodegenerative disease.

    Current studies in the lab focus on signaling pathways that are important in innate immunity, adaptive immunity and cancer, with particular focus on pathways that regulate the activity of the pleiotropic transcription factor NF-kB.

    Research Areas: immunology, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, autoimmune, hyperinflammatory states, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Joel Pomerantz, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • John T. Isaacs Laboratory

    While there has been an explosion of knowledge about human carcinogenesis over the last 2 decades, unfortunately, this has not translated into the development of effective therapies for either preventing or treating the common human cancers. The goal of the Isaacs’ lab is to change this situation by translating theory into therapy for solid malignancies, particularly Prostate cancer. Presently, a series of drugs discovered in the Isaacs’ lab are undergoing clinical trials in patients with metastatic cancer.

    The ongoing drug discovery in the lab continues to focus upon developing agents to eliminate the cancer initiating stem cells within metastatic sites of cancer. To do this, a variety of bacterial and natural product toxins are being chemically modified to produce “prodrugs” whose cytotoxicity is selectively activated by proteases produced in high levels only by cancer cells or tumor associated blood vessel cells. In this way, these prodrugs can be given systemically to metastati...c patients without un-acceptable toxicity to the host while being selectively activated to potent killing molecules within metastatic sites of cancer.

    Such a “Trojan Horse” approach is also being developed using allogeneic bone marrow derived Mesenchymal Stem cells which are genetically engineered to secrete “prodrugs” so that when they are infused into the patient, they selectively “home” to sites of cancers where the appropriate enzymatic activity is present to liberate the killing toxin sterilizing the cancer “neighborhood”.
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    Research Areas: anti-cancer drugs, stem cell biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    John Isaacs, Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Jon Russell Lab

    The Jon Russell lab focuses on thyroid and parathyroid pathology as well as improving patient safety and education using healthcare technology. Additional focuses include utilizing new technology to advance on the techniques of minimally invasive neck surgery. Current and previous efforts include the development of mobile and web-based applications to educate physicians and patients, utilizing ultrasound for vocal cord imaging, understanding the nuances of advanced thyroid cancer, and exploring the role of scarless thyroid surgery in a North American population.

    Research Areas: patient satisfaction, thyroid cancer, perioperative information delivery, health outcomes, otolaryngology, postoperative care, endocrinology

  • Jonathan D. Powell Lab

    The program in cancer and immunometabolism seeks to both understand and target metabolic programming in both the cancer and immune cells in order to enhance immunotherapy for cancer. To this end, in collaboration in with the Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery Program, the lab is developing novel agents that target tumor glutamine metabolism. These compounds not only inhibit tumor growth but render tumors more susceptible to immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade and adoptive cellular therapy. Additionally, the group is dissecting key metabolic pathways that regulate immune cell activation, differentiation and function. By targeting these pathways, they are discovering new ways to both enhance the efficacy of antitumor T cells as well as inhibit T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Research Areas: T cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Powell, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Jun O. Liu Laboratory

    The Jun O. Liu Laboratory tests small molecules to see if they react in our bodies to find potential drugs to treat disease. We employ high-throughput screening to identify modulators of various cellular processes and pathways that have been implicated in human diseases from cancer to autoimmune diseases. Once biologically active inhibitors are identified, they will serve both as probes of the biological processes of interest and as leads for the development of new drugs for treating human diseases. Among the biological processes of interest are cancer cell growth and apoptosis, angiogenesis, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, eukaryotic transcription and translation.

    Research Areas: cancer, autoimmune, eukaryotic cells, drugs, cellular signaling, pharmacology, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, molecular biology, angiogenesis

  • Jungsan Sohn

    Dr. Sohn's lab is interested in understanding how biological stress-sensors are assembled, detect danger signals and initiate stress response.

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens in higher eukaryotes. We are using in vitro quantitative biochemical assays and mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography to investigate the underlying operating principles of inflammasomes, a component of the innate immune system, to better understand biological stress sensors.

    Research Areas: immunology, cell biology, cancer, eukaryotes, stress sensors

  • Kathleen Gabrielson Laboratory

    Research in the Kathleen Gabrielson Laboratory focuses on the signal transduction of cardiovascular toxicities in vitro, in cardiomyocyte culture and in vivo using rodent models. Specifically, the research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of various cancer therapies that induce cardiac toxicities.

    Currently, we are testing prevention strategies for these toxicities by studying the cardiac effects of the anthracycline doxorubicin (adriamycin) and the immunotherapeutic agent, Herceptin, anti-erbB2. We are focusing on the signal transduction pathways in the heart that are modulated by anti-erbB2 treatment, which in turn, worsens doxorubicin toxicity. Thus, understanding the mechanisms behind the combined toxicity of doxorubicin and anti-erbB2 will pave the way for the design of strategies to reduce toxicity, identify patients at risk and potentially allow higher levels of this effective combination therapy to be used with an improved long-term survival in patients.

    Research Areas: cardiovascular toxicity, cancer, pathology, signal transduction

    Principal Investigator

    Kathleen Gabrielson, D.V.M., Ph.D.

    Department

    Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology

  • Kathryn Carson Lab

    The Kathryn Carson Lab investigates ways to improve medical research, particularly in the areas of brain and thyroid cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, hypertension, HIV and lupus. Our team seeks to help researchers optimize their studies through better study design, protocol and grant writing, data cleaning and analysis, and publication writing. We work with investigators from a wide range of departments through the Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical and Translational Research.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, lupus, research methods, data analysis, cancer, hypertension, clinical trials, HIV, biostatistics, Alzheimer's disease

    Principal Investigator

    Kathryn Carson, Sc.M.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kenneth J. Pienta Lab

    The Kenneth J. Pienta laboratory has championed the concept that cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis can best be understood utilizing the principles of Ecology. As a result, the Pienta laboratory is working to develop new treatments for cancer utilizing network disruption.

    Research Areas: biomarkers, cancer, metastasis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Kenneth Pienta, M.D.

    Department

    Urology

  • Kenneth W. Kinzler Laboratory

    Dr. Kinzler’s laboratory has focused on the genetics of human cancer. They have identified a variety of genetic mutations that underlie cancer, including mutations of the APC pathway that appear to initiate the majority of colorectal cancers and IDH1/2 mutations that underlying many gliomas. In addition, they have developed a variety of powerful tools for analysis of expression and genetic alterations in cancer.
    Most recently, they have pioneered integrated whole genome analyses of human cancers through expression, copy number, and mutational analyses of all the coding genes in several human cancer types including colorectal, breast, pancreatic and brain. The identification of genetic differences between normal and tumor tissues provide new therapeutic targets, new opportunities for the early diagnosis of cancer, and important insights into the neoplastic process.

    Research Areas: cancer, molecular genetics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Kenneth Kinzler, Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Kristine Glunde Lab

    The Glunde lab is within the Division of Cancer Imaging Research in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. The lab is developing mass spectrometry imaging as part of multimodal molecular imaging workflows to image and elucidate hypoxia-driven signaling pathways in breast cancer. They are working to further unravel the molecular basis of the aberrant choline phospholipid metabolism in cancer. The Glunde lab is developing novel optical imaging agents for multi-scale molecular imaging of lysosomes in breast tumors and discovering structural changes in Collagen I matrices and their role in breast cancer and metastasis.

    Research Areas: breast cancer, mass spectrometry, imaging, cancer, metastasis, metabolism, optical imaging

  • Lee Bone Lab

    Research in the Lee Bone Lab uses community-based participatory approaches to promote health in underserved urban African-American populations. We conduct randomized clinical trials on cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer detection and control in order to test the success of community interventions. We focus in particular on making interventions sustainable and on implementing electronic education to improve communication.

    Research Areas: African Americans, cancer, diabetes, community outreach, cardiovascular diseases, community health education

    Principal Investigator

    Lee Bone, M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Lei Zheng Lab

    Zheng’s research focuses on two R01-funded projects; first, the group has developed a pancreatic cancer immunotherapy research program on a neoadjuvant therapy platform as well as a number of preclinical models of pancreatic cancer for developing innovative immunotherapy strategies. The group has applied the knowledge gained from pancreatic cancer immune-based therapies to the development of a colorectal cancer GVAX vaccine. Second, the group is aimed at understanding the mechanistic roles of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and metastasis and identifying new targets for pancreatic cancer therapies by dissecting the tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer.

    Research Areas: cancer, pancreatic cancer, translational research, tumor microenvironment, immunotherapy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Lei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology
    Surgery

  • Liliana Florea Lab

    Research in the Liliana Florea Lab applies computational techniques toward modeling and problem solving in biology and genetic medicine. We work to develop computational methods for analyzing large-scale sequencing data to help characterize molecular mechanisms of diseases. The specific application areas of our research include genome analysis and comparison, cDNA-to-genome alignment, gene and alternative splicing annotation, RNA editing, microbial comparative genomics, miRNA genomics and computational vaccine design. Our most recent studies seek to achieve accurate and efficient RNA-seq correction and explore the role of HCV viral miRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Research Areas: evolutionary genomics, vaccines, carcinoma, cancer, genomics, bioinformatics, RNA, comparative genomics

    Principal Investigator

    Liliana Florea, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Linda Lee Lab

    The Linda Lee Lab studies care of complex cancer patients who had liver or gastrointestinal issues. Our previous work includes studying the function of a cancer protein called Myc in liver cancer.

    Research Areas: cancer, gastrointestinal

    Principal Investigator

    Linda Lee, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Linda Smith-Resar Lab

    The Linda Smith-Resar Lab primarily investigates hematologic malignancy and molecular mechanisms that lead to cancer as well as sickle cell anemia. Recent studies suggest that education is an important and effective component of a patient blood management program and that computerized provider order entry algorithms may serve to maintain compliance with evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Another recent study indicated that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to colorectal cancer, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention.

    Research Areas: blood disorders, sickle cell diseases, blood management programs, hematologic malignancies

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Linda Smith-Resar, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Lonny Yarmus Lab

    Clinical trials conducted in the Lonny Yarmus Lab focus primarily on minimally-invasive diagnostic testing for patients with lung cancer and local therapy options for malignant airway obstructions. We investigate ways to improve the early diagnosis of lung cancer, as well as the treatment of later-stage cancer, using the least invasive methods possible. We are also part of the LIBERATE clinical study for patients who have difficulty breathing and suffer from severe emphysema.

    Research Areas: emphysema, interventional pulmonology, airway stenosis, minimally-invasive diagnostic testing, lung cancer, central airway obstructions, lung transplant

    Principal Investigator

    Lonny Yarmus, D.O.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Machine Biointerface Lab

    Dr. Fridman's research group invents and develops bioelectronics for Neuroengineering and Medical Instrumentation applications. We develop innovative medical technology and we also conduct the necessary biological studies to understand how the technology could be effective and safe for people.

    Our lab is currently focused on developing the "Safe Direct Current Stimulation" technology, or SDCS. Unlike the currently available commercial neural prosthetic devices, such as cochlear implants, pacemakers, or Parkinson's deep brain stimulators that can only excite neurons, SDCS can excite, inhibit, and even sensitize them to input. This new technology opens a door to a wide range of applications that we are currently exploring along with device development: e.g. peripheral nerve stimulation for suppressing neuropathic pain, vestibular nerve stimulation to correct balance disorders, vagal nerve stimulation to suppress an asthma attack, and a host of other neuroprosthetic applications.

    M...edical Instrumentation MouthLab is a "tricorder" device that we invented here in the Machine Biointerface Lab. The device currently obtains all vital signs within 60s: Pulse rate, breathing rate, temperature, blood pressure, blood oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, and FEV1 (lung function) measurement. Because the device is in the mouth, it has access to saliva and to breath and we are focused now on expanding its capability to obtaining measures of dehydration and biomarkers that could be indicative of a wide range of internal disorders ranging from stress to kidney failure and even lung cancer.
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    Research Areas: medical instruments, bioelectricities, neuroengineering, nerve stimulation

  • Marcia Canto Lab

    Research interests in the Marcia Canto Lab include pancreatic neoplasms, Barrett’s esophagus and endomicroscopy. We are also interested in the use of endoscopic ultrasound to identify early-stage pancreatic cancer and its precursors.

    Research Areas: endomicroscopy, pancreatic cancer, endoscopy, Barrett's esophagus

    Principal Investigator

    Marcia Canto, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Marie-France Penet Lab

    The Penet lab is within the Division of Cancer Imaging Research in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. The lab research focuses on using multimodal imaging techniques to better understand the microenvironment and improve cancer early detection, especially in ovarian cancer. By combining MRI, MRS and optical imaging, we are studying the tumor microenvironment to understand the role of hypoxia, tumor vascularization, macromolecular transport and tumor metabolism in tumor progression, metastasis and ascites formation in orthotopic models of cancer. We also are studying the role of tumor-associated macrophages in tumor progression.

    Research Areas: tumor vascularization, prostate cancer, tumor metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, macromolecular transport, optical imaging, pancreatic cancer, MRI, tumor-associated macrophages, hypoxia, ovarian cancer, cancer-induced cachexia, cancer imaging

  • Martin G. Pomper Lab

    Recent advances in molecular and cellular biology, the emergence of more sophisticated animal models of human disease and the development of sensitive, high-resolution imaging systems enable the study of pathophysiology noninvasively in unprecedented detail. The overall goal of our work is to develop new techniques and agents to study human disease through imaging. We concentrate on two areas, i.e., cancer and central nervous system processes. Our work extends from basic chemical and radiochemical synthesis to clinical translation.

    Research Areas: imaging, cancer

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Martin Pomper, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department