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Displaying 61 to 70 of 86 results for brain

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  • Peter Agre Lab

    Work in the Peter Agre Lab focuses on the molecular makeup of human diseases, particularly malaria, hemolytic anemias and blood group antigens. In 2003, Dr. Agre earned the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering aquaporin water channels. Building on that discovery, our recent research has included studies on the protective role of the brain water channel AQP4 in murine cerebral malaria, as well as defective urinary-concentrating ability as a result of a complete deficiency in aquaporin-1. We also collaborate on scientific training and research efforts with 20 Baltimore-area labs and in field studies in Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Research Areas: infectious disease, anemia, malaria

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Agre, M.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Peter van Zijl Laboratory

    The Peter van Zijl Laboratory focuses on developing new methodologies for using MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to study brain function and physiology. In addition, we are working to understand the basic mechanisms of the MRI signal changes measured during functional MRI (fMRI) tests of the brain. We are also mapping the wiring of the brain (axonal connections between the brains functional regions) and designing new technologies for MRI to follow where cells are migrating and when genes are expressed. A more recent interest is the development of bioorganic biodegradable MRI contrast agents. Our ultimate goal is to transform these technologies into fast methods that are compatible with the time available for multi-modal clinical diagnosis using MRI.

    Research Areas: brain, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, MRI

  • Psychiatric Neuroimaging

    Psychiatric Neuroimaging (PNI) is active in neuropsychiatric research using imaging methods such as MRI, fMRI, PET and DTI to understand the mechanisms and brain networks underlying human cognition. PNI faculty have published hundreds of papers on a variety of brain disorders which include but are not limited to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, bipolar disorder, and eating disorders. Faculty in the division have been awarded numerous peer-reviewed grants by the National Institutes of Health, foundations and other funding organizations.

    Research Areas: brain disorders

  • Raul Chavez-Valdez Lab

    Dr. Raul Chavez-Valdez is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics with great interest in the mechanisms of delayed injury and repair/regeneration in the developing neonatal brain following injury, specifically following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (birth asphyxia). He collaborates with Dr. Frances Northington (Pediatrics) and Dr. Lee Martin (Pathology/Neuroscience) in unveiling the importance of programmed necrosis in the setting of brain injury induced by birth asphyxia. He is especially interested in the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-4 following birth asphyxia and the changes that may explain the suspected excitatory/ inhibitory (E/I) imbalance particularly in the hippocampus. His work is highly translational since delayed hippocampal injury due to E/I imbalance may explain memory deficits observed despite therapeutic hypothermia in neonates suffering birth asphyxia. All of these aspects of developmental neuroplasticity are the base of ...his Career Development Award (NIH/NINDS-K08 award) and applications to other agencies. Additionally, he is part of multiple clinical efforts as part of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Nursery (NICN). He has been a Sutland-Pakula Endowed Fellow of Neonatal Research since September 2013. view more

    Research Areas: critical care medicine, neonatal, neuroscience, pediatrics, intensive care, pediatric critical care medicine

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Raul Chavez Valdez, M.D.

    Department

    Pediatrics

  • Rebecca Riggs Lab

    Research in the Rebecca Riggs Lab focuses on developing safer, less-invasive ways to detect traumatic brain injury and abusive head trauma. We are exploring the use of bedside ophthalmic ultrasonography to find retinal lesions associated with abusive head trauma, as well as investigating the use of other types of sonography to monitor intracranial hypertension. Such tools would be safer than current methods, which are often invasive or emit high levels of radiation. Additionally, portable monitors could be used outside of the hospital, in settings such as football games, to better and more quickly diagnose concussions.

    Research Areas: traumatic brain injuries, patient safety, sonography, hypertension

  • Robert Stevens Lab

    The Robert Stevens Lab seeks to generate a comprehensive anatomical and functional map of neural injury and repair following incidents such as trauma, stroke, anoxia and sepsis. Several projects have evaluated the relationship between critical illness and central or peripheral nervous system dysfunction. Ongoing projects deploy quantitative brain mapping to probe recovery of consciousness and cognitive function in patients who have experienced acute neurologic insults from trauma, stroke, cardiac arrest and sepsis.

    Research Areas: anoxia, stroke, trauma, sepsis, neural injury

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Stevens, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ronald Schnaar Lab

    The Ronald Schnaar Lab is involved in the rapidly expanding field of glycobiology, which studies cell surface glycans, lectins, and their roles in cell physiology.

    Current projects in our lab study include (1) Glycans and glycan-binding proteins in inflammatory lung diseases, (2) Ganglioside function in the brain, and (3) HIV-Tat and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Research Areas: cell physiology, HIV, neurocognitive disorders, glycobiology

  • S.C.O.R.E. Lab

    The mission of the Stroke Cognitive Outcomes and Recovery (S.C.O.R.E.) Lab is to enhance knowledge of brain mechanisms that allow people recover language, empathy, and other cognitive and communicative functions after stroke, and to improve ways to facilitate recovery of these functions after stroke. We also seek to improve the understanding of neurobiology of primary progressive aphasia., and how to enhance communication in people with this group of clinical syndromes.

    Research Areas: cerebrovascular, cognitive neuroscience, dementia

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Argye Hillis, M.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • Sesaki Lab

    The Sesaki Lab is interested in the molecular mechanisms and physiological roles of mitochondrial fusion. Mitochondria are highly dynamic and control their morphology by a balance of fusion and fission. The regulation of membrane fusion and fission generates a striking diversity of mitochondrial shapes, ranging from numerous small spheres in hepatocytes to long branched tubules in myotubes. In addition to shape and number, mitochondrial fusion is critical for normal organelle function.

    Research Areas: brain, mitochondrial fusion, mitochondria, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Hiromi Sesaki, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Seth Margolis Laboratory

    The Seth Margolis Laboratory studies the signaling pathways that regulate synapse formation during normal brain development to try to understand how, when these pathways go awry, human cognitive disorders develop.

    We use Ephexin5 to study the molecular pathways that regulate restriction of excitatory synapse formation and their relevance to the pathophysiology of Angelman syndrome.

    Research Areas: cognition, Angelman syndrome, human development, cellular signaling, synapse formation

    Principal Investigator

    Seth Margolis, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

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