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Displaying 1 to 37 of 37 results for biomarkers

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  • Chirag Parikh Lab

    Dr. Parikh's research focuses on the translation and validation of novel biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of acute kidney injury. Progress in kidney diseases has been hamstrung by significant heterogeneity within the current disease definitions, which are largely based on serum creatinine. Dr. Parikh's research has addressed this critical challenge by developing biomarkers of renal tubular injury, repair, and inflammation to dissect this heterogeneity. He has assembled multicenter longitudinal prospective cohorts for translational research studies across several clinical settings of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease for the efficient translation of novel biomarkers.

    His research is dedicated to the process of applying discoveries generated in the laboratory and in preclinical experiments, the development of clinical studies, and the design of clinical trials. Dr. Parikh's studies have refined the clinical definition in perioperative acute kidney injury and hep...atorenal syndrome, developed strategies to reduce kidney discard in deceased donor transplantation, and advanced regulatory approvals of kidney injury biomarkers. He has also developed biomarkers to identify rapid progressors of early diabetic kidney disease before derangements in serum creatinine. Dr. Parikh's research goal is to translate our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms into clinical practice and improve the outcomes in patients with kidney disease.

    Dr. Parikh has also been the recipient of numerous honors, including the 2017 Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Nephrology.
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    Research Areas: acute kidney injury, biomarkers, Kidney Transplantation, chronic kidney disease

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Chirag Parikh, M.B.B.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Christopher A. Ross Lab

    Dr. Ross and his research team have focused on Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease, and now are using insights from these disorders to approach more complex diseases such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. They use biophysical and biochemical techniques, cell models, and transgenic mouse models to understand disease processes, and to provide targets for development of rational therapeutics. These then can provide a basis for developing small molecule interventions, which can be used both as probes to study biology, and if they have favorable drug-like properties, for potential therapeutic development. We have used two strategies for identifying lead compounds. The first is the traditional path of identification of specific molecular targets, such as enzymes like the LRRK2 kinase of Parkinson’s disease. Once structure is known, computational approaches or fragment based lead discovery, in collaboration, can be used. The second is to conduct phenotypic screens using ce...ll models, or in a collaboration, natural products in a yeast model. Once a lead compound is identified, we use cell models for initial tests of compounds, then generate analogs, and take compounds that look promising to preclinical therapeutic studies in animal models. The ultimate goal is to develop therapeutic strategies that can be brought to human clinical trials, and we have pioneered in developing biomarkers and genetic testing for developing strategies. view less

    Research Areas: psychiatric disorders

  • Clinical Laboratory and Biomarkers Core

    The Clinical Laboratory and Biomarkers Cores will coordinate access to laboratory expertise, testing, training, specimen repositories and Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP). The goals of this core are to assure that all JHU HIV investigators have access to and utilize appropriate, validated and, where applicable, certified laboratory assays. The core will also maintain a biomarker specimen repository for storage cataloguing and utilization of biological specimens.

    Research Areas: virology, immunology, biomarkers, HIV, pathogenesis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Craig W. Hendrix, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Daria Gaykalova Lab

    The Daria Gakalova Lab defines the functional role of epigenetics in transcriptional regulation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) progression. To evaluate the whole-genome distribution of various histone marks, her team is using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq) for primary tissues, a method recently developed by her lab. The research group of Daria Gaykalova was the first to demonstrate the cancer-specific distribution of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac marks and their role in cancer-related gene expression in HNSCC. The research showed that an aberrant chromatin alteration is a central event in carcinogenesis and that the therapeutic control of chromatin structure can prevent the primary of secondary cancerization. Further preliminary data suggest that the differential enrichment of these disease-specific histone marks and DNA methylation correlate with alternative splicing events (ASE) formation. For this project, Dr. Gaykalova... and her team employed a novel bioinformatical tool for the detection of cancer-specific ASEs. Through thorough functional validation of the individual ASEs, the lab demonstrated that each of them has a unique mechanism of malignant transformation of the cells. Due to high disease specificity, ASEs represent the perfect biomarkers of the neoantigens and have direct application to clinical practice. view less

    Research Areas: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, Human papillomavirus, Alternative splicing, epigenetics, Chromatin structure, Cancer genomics, head and neck cancer

  • Eberhart, Rodriguez and Raabe Lab

    Utilizing a combination of tissue-based, cell-based, and molecular approaches, our research goals focus on abnormal telomere biology as it relates to cancer initiation and tumor progression, with a particular interest in the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) phenotype. In addition, our laboratories focus on cancer biomarker discovery and validation with the ultimate aim to utilize these novel tissue-based biomarkers to improve individualized prevention, detection, and treatment strategies.

    Research Areas: cancer therapies, preventing cancer metastasis, cancer, cancer biomarkers

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Charles Eberhart, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Eberhart, Rodriguez and Raabe Lab

    Utilizing a combination of tissue-based, cell-based, and molecular approaches, our research goals focus on abnormal telomere biology as it relates to cancer initiation and tumor progression, with a particular interest in the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) phenotype. In addition, our laboratories focus on cancer biomarker discovery and validation with the ultimate aim to utilize these novel tissue-based biomarkers to improve individualized prevention, detection, and treatment strategies.

    Research Areas: stem cells, eye tumor, tumor cell metastasis, brain tumor

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Charles Eberhart, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • Elizabeth Selvin Lab

    The Elizabeth Selvin Lab examines the intersection of epidemiology, clinical policy and public health policy. One of our key goals is to use the findings of epidemiologic research to inform the screening, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease. Much of our work looks at biomarkers and diagnostics related to diabetes and diabetes complications. Our findings — linking hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to diabetic complications and identifying the role of A1c in diabetes diagnosis — have influenced clinical practice guidelines.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, biomarkers, kidney diseases, obesity, diabetes, health care policy, cardiovascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Elizabeth Selvin, M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Fisher Biomarker Research Laboratory

    The Veltri-Partin Fisher Biomarker Laboratory strives to improve the early detection, staging, monitoring and prognosis of prostate cancer and other urologic cancers with the use of biomarkers.

    Research Areas: prostate cancer, biomarkers, urologic cancers

    Principal Investigator

    Alan Partin, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Urology

  • Franck Housseau Lab

    The Franck Housseau Lab focuses on the role of the microbiome in colorectal tumorigenesis and on developing a better understanding of the tumor immune microenvironment. The lab is currently working to define the biomarkers of a pre-existing antitumor immune response in metastatic colorectal cancer to define a population of patients eligible for checkpoint blockade therapies.

    Research Areas: microbiology, tumor immunology, microbiome, colorectal cancer, cancer, colon cancer, tumor microenvironment, immunotherapy

    Principal Investigator

    Franck Housseau, Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • GI Biomarkers Laboratory

    The GI Biomarkers Laboratory studies gastrointestinal cancer and pre-cancer biogenesis and biomarkers. The lab is led by Dr. Stephen Meltzer, who is known for his research in the molecular pathobiology of gastrointestinal malignancy and premalignancy. Research in the lab has led to several groundbreaking genomic, epigenomic and bioinformatic studies of esophageal and colonic neoplasms, shifting the gastrointestinal research paradaigm toward genome-wide approaches.

    Research Areas: gastrointestinal system, biomarkers, cancer, epigenetics, genomics, bioinformatics, biogenesis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Stephen Meltzer, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • GI Early Detection Biomarkers Lab

    Dr. Meltzer is an internationally renowned leader in the molecular pathobiology of gastrointestinal malignancy and premalignancy. He invented molecular methods to detect loss of heterozygosity in tiny biopsies, triggering an avalanche of research on precancerous lesions. He was the first to comprehensively study coding region microsatellite instability, leading to the identification of several important tumor suppressor genes. He performed several groundbreaking genomic, epigenomic and bioinformatic studies of esophageal and colonic neoplasms, shifting the GI research paradigm toward genome-wide approaches. He directed an ambitious nationwide validation study of DNA methylation-based biomarkers for the prediction of neoplastic progression in Barrett’s esophagus.

    Dr. Meltzer founded and led the Aerodigestive Cancer and Biomarker Interdisciplinary Programs at the University of Maryland, also becoming associate director for core sciences at that school’s Cancer Center. He currently hol...ds an endowed professorship and is the director of GI biomarker research at Johns Hopkins.

    The laboratory group focuses its efforts on the molecular genetics of gastrointestinal cancers and premalignant lesions, as well as on translational research to improve early detection, prognostic evaluation, and treatment of these conditions. Below, some examples of this work are described.
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    Research Areas: gastrointestinal cancer, gastrointestinal

    Principal Investigator

    Stephen Meltzer, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Haughey Lab: Neurodegenerative and Neuroinfectious Disease

    Dr. Haughey directs a disease-oriented research program that address questions in basic neurobiology, and clinical neurology. The primary research interests of the laboratory are:

    1. To identify biomarkers markers for neurodegenerative diseases including HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders, Multiple Sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. In these studies, blood and cerebral spinal fluid samples obtained from ongoing clinical studies are analyzed for metabolic profiles through a variety of biochemical, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic techniques. These biomarkers can then be used in the diagnosis of disease, as prognostic indicators to predict disease trajectory, or as surrogate markers to track the effectiveness of disease modifying interventions.
    2. To better understand how the lipid components of neuronal, and glial membranes interact with proteins to regulate signal transduction associated with differentiation, motility, inflammatory signaling, survival, and neuronal excitab...ility.
    3. To understand how extracellular vesicles (exosomes) released from brain resident cells regulate neuronal excitability, neural network activity, and peripheral immune responses to central nervous system damage and infections.
    4. To develop small molecule therapeutics that regulate lipid metabolism as a neuroprotective and restorative strategy for neurodegenerative conditions.
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    Research Areas: multiple sclerosis, PTSD, HAND, HIV

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Norman Haughey, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology
    Neurosurgery

  • Healthy Brain Program

    The Brain Health Program is a multidisciplinary team of faculty from the departments of neurology, psychiatry, epidemiology, and radiology lead by Leah Rubin and Jennifer Coughlin. In the hope of revealing new directions for therapies, the group studies molecular biomarkers identified from tissue and brain imaging that are associated with memory problems related to HIV infection, aging, dementia, mental illness and traumatic brain injury. The team seeks to advance policies and practices to optimize brain health in vulnerable populations while destigmatizing these brain disorders.

    Current and future projects include research on: the roles of the stress response, glucocorticoids, and inflammation in conditions that affect memory and the related factors that make people protected or or vulnerable to memory decline; new mobile apps that use iPads to improve our detection of memory deficits; clinical trials looking at short-term effects of low dose hydrocortisone and randomized to 28 day...s of treatment; imaging brain injury and repair in NFL players to guide players and the game; and the role of inflammation in memory deterioration in healthy aging, patients with HIV, and other neurodegenerative conditions. view more

    Research Areas: HIV infection, mental illness, aging, traumatic brain injury, dementia

  • Heng Zhu Lab

    The Zhu lab is focused on characterizing the activities of large collection of proteins, building signaling networks for better understanding the mechanisms of biological processes, and identifying biomarkers in human diseases and cancers. More specifically, our group is interested in analyzing protein posttranslational modifications, and identifying important components involved in transcription networks and host-pathogen interactions on the proteomics level, and biomarkers in human IBD diseases.

    Research Areas: inflammatory bowel disease, biomarkers, cancer

  • IBD and Autoimmune Liver Diseases Laboratory

    Investigators in the IBD and Autoimmune Liver Diseases Laboratory conduct basic and translational research in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and autoimmune liver diseases. One area of focus is discovering and developing biomarkers for diagnosing and prognosticating IBD and other autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). We also are exploring the molecular pathogenesis of—and developing novel therapies for—IBD. In addition, we are working to understand the molecular reason why many IBD patients fail to respond to mainstay drug therapies—and to develop diagnostic assays that can predict non-responders before starting them on those therapies. These biomarker studies have led to our application for four U.S. and international patents.

    Research Areas: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, gastrointestinal system, colitis, autoimmune diseases, pathogenesis, celiac disease, liver diseases

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Xu Li, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Integrated Research Center for Fetal Medicine

    Currently supported research includes pathophysiology of fetal brain development with intrauterine insults, ultrasound and bio- markers of fetal well-being and biomarkers for fetal disease stratification and response to treatment (such as magnesium sulfate administration or head cooling as in cases of neuroinflammation).

    Research Areas: fetal brain development

  • James Hamilton Lab

    The main research interests of the James Hamilton Lab are the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and the development of molecular markers to help diagnose and manage cancer of the liver. In addition, we are investigating biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and response to various treatment modalities. Results of this study will provide a molecular classification of HCC and allow us to identify targets for chemoprevention and treatment. Specifically, we extract genomic DNA and total RNA from liver tissues and use this genetic material for methylation-specific PCR (MSP), cDNA microarray, microRNA microarray and genomic DNA methylation array experiments.

    Research Areas: cancer, molecular genetics, genomics, pathogenesis, liver diseases, hepatocellular carcinoma

    Principal Investigator

    James Hamilton, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jean Kim Lab

    The Jean Kim Laboratory performs translational research in the
    area of chronic rhinosinusitis, with a niche interest in the pathogenesis of hyperplastic nasal
    polyposis. Studies encompass clinical research to basic wet laboratory research in
    studying the underlying immune and autoimmune mediated mechanism of polyp growth and
    perpetuation of disease. Human cell and tissue culture models are used. Techniques in the
    laboratory include cell and tissue culture, real time PCR, immunoblot, ELISA, flow cytometry,
    immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, gene array analysis, and other molecular
    approaches including genetic knockdowns. Approaches used in Dr. Kim’s clinical study
    designs include prospective and retrospective analysis of patient outcomes and clinical
    biomarkers, as wells controlled clinical trials.

    Research Areas: nasal polyps, chronic rhinosinusitis, hyperplastic nasal polyposis

  • John Aucott Lab

    Research in the John Aucott Lab focuses on the development of accurate diagnostic tests for all stages of Lyme disease. We work closely with Dr. Mark Soloski on the Study of Lyme disease Immunology and Clinical Events (SLICE), a longitudinal, matched-control study of patients diagnosed with early untreated Lyme disease. The objective is to use the collected biological samples to help identify novel Lyme disease biomarkers that can inform diagnoses, outcomes and the knowledge about disease pathophysiology.

    Research Areas: clinical outcomes, gender differences, biomarkers, pathophysiology, immune heterogeneity, Lyme disease

    Principal Investigator

    John Aucott, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jonathan Zenilman Lab

    The Jonathan Zenilman lab conducts research related to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). We are working to develop biological markers for sexual behavior to use in other research. The lab studies sexual risk behaviors in highly vulnerable populations and studies datasets from the Baltimore City Health Department to understand STD trends and behaviors. Additionally, we study nosocomial infections at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, with a focus on developing an antimicrobial control program. We also conduct clinical research related to the natural history and microbiology of chronic wounds in the outpatient setting.

    Research Areas: behavioral research, biomarkers, sexually transmitted diseases, nosocomial infections

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Zenilman, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kenneth J. Pienta Lab

    The Kenneth J. Pienta laboratory has championed the concept that cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis can best be understood utilizing the principles of Ecology. As a result, the Pienta laboratory is working to develop new treatments for cancer utilizing network disruption.

    Research Areas: biomarkers, cancer, metastasis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Kenneth Pienta, M.D.

    Department

    Urology

  • Laura Hummers Lab

    The Laura Hummers Lab participates in a number of clinical trials and clinical investigations at the Scleroderma Center at Johns Hopkins. We have a particular interest in the predictors of outcomes in scleroderma. We’ve established a prospective cohort of 300 scleroderma patients to identify incident vascular outcomes in the hopes of identifying new biomarkers for disease development and progression.

    Research Areas: rheumatology, biomarkers, scleroderma

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Laura Hummers, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab

    Work in the Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab explores the shared mechanisms present in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome and myositis. We use disease-specific autoantibodies to identify the factors that cause the autoimmune response in such diseases. Our current research involves identifying the antigen targets of autoimmune diseases, investigating the autoantigens targeted in cancers associated with rheumatic diseases and finding unique clinical biomarkers, such as the anti-HMGCR antibody specificity.

    Research Areas: autoantibodies, myositis, rheumatology, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Livia Casciola-Rosen, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Machine Biointerface Lab

    Dr. Fridman's research group invents and develops bioelectronics for Neuroengineering and Medical Instrumentation applications. We develop innovative medical technology and we also conduct the necessary biological studies to understand how the technology could be effective and safe for people.

    Our lab is currently focused on developing the "Safe Direct Current Stimulation" technology, or SDCS. Unlike the currently available commercial neural prosthetic devices, such as cochlear implants, pacemakers, or Parkinson's deep brain stimulators that can only excite neurons, SDCS can excite, inhibit, and even sensitize them to input. This new technology opens a door to a wide range of applications that we are currently exploring along with device development: e.g. peripheral nerve stimulation for suppressing neuropathic pain, vestibular nerve stimulation to correct balance disorders, vagal nerve stimulation to suppress an asthma attack, and a host of other neuroprosthetic applications.

    M...edical Instrumentation MouthLab is a "tricorder" device that we invented here in the Machine Biointerface Lab. The device currently obtains all vital signs within 60s: Pulse rate, breathing rate, temperature, blood pressure, blood oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, and FEV1 (lung function) measurement. Because the device is in the mouth, it has access to saliva and to breath and we are focused now on expanding its capability to obtaining measures of dehydration and biomarkers that could be indicative of a wide range of internal disorders ranging from stress to kidney failure and even lung cancer.
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    Research Areas: medical instruments, bioelectricities, neuroengineering, nerve stimulation

  • Morgan Grams Lab

    Research in the Morgan Grams Lab focuses on preventing and improving the complications associated with chronic kidney disease. Recent work includes examining the racial differences in and prognostic value of biomarkers of hyperglycemia. We’ve also developed an online tool to help identify living kidney donor candidates. The tool assesses the long-term risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by weighing a variety of factors.

    Research Areas: organ donors, hyperglycemia, biomarkers, chronic kidney disease, health disparities

    Principal Investigator

    Morgan Grams, M.D., M.H.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Qian-Li Xue Lab

    The primary area of statistical expertise in the Qian-Li Xue Lab is the development and application of statistical methods for: (1) handling the truncation of information on underlying or unobservable outcomes (e.g., disability) as a result of screening, (2) missing data, including outcome (e.g., frailty) censoring by a competing risk (e.g., mortality) and (3) trajectory analysis of multivariate outcomes. Other areas of methodologic research interests include multivariate, latent variable models. In Women's Health and Aging Studies, we have closely collaborated with scientific investigators on the design and analysis of longitudinal data relating biomarkers of inflammation, hormonal dysregulation and micronutrient deficiencies to the development and progression of frailty and disability, as well as characterizing the natural history of change in cognitive and physical function over time.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, disabilities, longitudinal data, hormonal dysregulation, women's health, inflammation, frailty, biostatistics, gerontology, latent variables

    Principal Investigator

    Qian-Li Xue, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Richard F. Ambinder Lab

    Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus are found in association with a variety of cancers. Our laboratory studies are aimed at better defining the role(s) of the virus in the pathogenesis of these diseases and the development of strategies to prevent, diagnose or treat them. We have become particularly interested in the unfolded protein response in activation of latent viral infection. Among the notions that we are exploring is the possibility that activation of virus-encoded enzymes will allow the targeted delivery of radation. In addition, we are investigating a variety of virus-related biomarkers including viral DNA, antibody responses, and cytokine measurements that may be clinically relevant.

    Research Areas: virology, antiviral therapy

  • Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian Lab

    Dr. Yegnasubramanian directs a Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (SKCCC), and is also the Director of the SKCCC Next Generation Sequencing Center.


    Our lab research is focused on understanding the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in carcinogenesis and disease progression, and to exploit this understanding in developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and risk stratification as well as in identifying targets for therapeutic intervention.

    Research Areas: cancer therapies, biomarkers, genetics, cancer, epigenetics

  • Suzanne Topalian Lab

    Our lab currently focuses on three areas of immunotherapy research: gaining a deeper knowledge of the biological underpinnings of human autoimmune response; discovering biomarkers that will help us identify which patients and tumor types are most likely to respond to various immune therapies; and developing immune-based treatment combinations that could deliver a more powerful anti-tumor response than monotherapies.

    Research Areas: cancer, PD-1, melanoma, immunotherapy, cancer immunology

    Principal Investigator

    Suzanne Topalian, M.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • The Bigos Lab

    The Bigos Lab focuses on a Precision Medicine approach to the treatment of psychiatric illness. In addition, this lab employs functional neuroimaging and genetics as biomarkers in neuropsychiatric drug development. A recent study used functional MRI to test the neural effects of a drug with the potential to treat cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. Other studies aim to identify patient-specific variables including sex, race, and genetics that impact drug clearance and clinical response to better select and dose antipsychotics and antidepressants.

    Research Areas: cognition, brain disorders, schizophrenia, mental illness, fMRI, pharmacogenomics, neuroimaging

  • The Meeker-Heaphy Lab

    Utilizing a combination of tissue-based, cell-based, and molecular approaches, our research goals focus on abnormal telomere biology as it relates to cancer initiation and tumor progression, with a particular interest in the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) phenotype. In addition, our laboratories focus on cancer biomarker discovery and validation with the ultimate aim to utilize these novel tissue-based biomarkers to improve individualized prevention, detection, and treatment strategies.

    Research Areas: preventing cancer metastasis, cancer, tumor cell metastasis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Christopher Heaphy, Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

  • The Pathak Lab

    The Pathak lab is within the Division of Cancer Imaging Research in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. We develop novel imaging methods, computational models and visualization tools to ‘make visible’ critical aspects of cancer, stroke and neurobiology. Our research broadly encompasses the following areas: Functional and Molecular Imaging; Clinical Biomarker Development; Image-based Systems Biology and Visualization and Computational Tools. We are dedicated to mentoring the next generation of imagers, biomedical engineers and visualizers. Additional information can be found at www.pathaklab.org or by emailing Dr. Pathak.

    Research Areas: microscopy, vasculature, tumors, systems biology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, 3D imaging, biomarkers, optical imaging, angiogenesis, cancer imaging

  • Translational Neurobiology Laboratory

    The goals of the Translational neurobiology Laboratory are to understand the pathogenesis and cell death pathways in neurodegenerative disorders to reveal potential therapeutic targets for pharmaceutical intervention; to investigate endogenous survival pathways and try to induce these pathways to restore full function or replace lost neurons; and to identify biomarkers to mark disease function or replace lost neurons; and to identify biomarkers to mark disease progression and evaluate therapeutics. Our research projects focus on models of Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. We use a combination of cell biology and transgenic animal models of these diseases.

    Research Areas: Huntington's disease, neurodegenerative disorders, neurobiology, cell biology, Parkinson's disease

  • Virginia Weaver Lab

    The Virginia Weaver Lab uses molecular epidemiology tools to evaluate chemically exposed populations. We explore the validation of exposure and early biological effect markers for research and medical surveillance. Our primary research area is the effects of occupational and environmental toxicants on the kidney. We are currently investigating how metals affect kidney function, examining in particular clinical measures and early biological effect markers, including urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Our studies have involved populations of lead workers in South Korea and environmentally exposed adolescents in Mexico.

    Research Areas: medical surveillance, global health, epidemiology, biomarkers, kidney diseases, environment

    Principal Investigator

    Virginia Weaver, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Zhu Lab

    The Zhu lab is focused on characterizing the activities of large collection of proteins, building signaling networks for better understanding the mechanisms of biological processes, and identifying biomarkers in human diseases and cancers.

    More specifically, our group is interested in analyzing protein posttranslational modifications, and identifying important components involved in transcription networks and host-pathogen interactions on the proteomics level, and biomarkers in human IBD diseases.

    Research Areas: proteomics, biomarkers, cancer, genomics, protein chip, signaling networks

    Principal Investigator

    Heng Zhu, Ph.D.

    Department

    Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences

  • Zsuzsanna McMahan Lab

    The Zsuzsanna McMahan Lab conducts translational research that seeks to identify the novel antigens in scleroderma and to define the target tissue in this disease. We are conducting two active clinical research trials, including one that studies skin biopsy specimens as biomarkers of scleroderma and the response to mycophenolate mofetil (MMF or Cellcept). The other study is a gastrointestinal involvement registry that follows patients who are experiencing GERD, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, constipation, fecal incontinence and gastroparesis to see if there is improvement in symptoms after a change in treatment is implemented.

    Research Areas: gastrointestinal system, rheumatology, biomarkers, scleroderma, antigens, mycophenolate mofetil

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Zsuzsanna McMahan, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

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