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Displaying 21 to 30 of 36 results for biomarkers

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  • Laura Hummers Lab

    The Laura Hummers Lab participates in a number of clinical trials and clinical investigations at the Scleroderma Center at Johns Hopkins. We have a particular interest in the predictors of outcomes in scleroderma. We’ve established a prospective cohort of 300 scleroderma patients to identify incident vascular outcomes in the hopes of identifying new biomarkers for disease development and progression.

    Research Areas: rheumatology, biomarkers, scleroderma

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Laura Hummers, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab

    Work in the Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab explores the shared mechanisms present in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome and myositis. We use disease-specific autoantibodies to identify the factors that cause the autoimmune response in such diseases. Our current research involves identifying the antigen targets of autoimmune diseases, investigating the autoantigens targeted in cancers associated with rheumatic diseases and finding unique clinical biomarkers, such as the anti-HMGCR antibody specificity.

    Research Areas: autoantibodies, myositis, rheumatology, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Livia Casciola-Rosen, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Machine Biointerface Lab

    Dr. Fridman's research group invents and develops bioelectronics for Neuroengineering and Medical Instrumentation applications. We develop innovative medical technology and we also conduct the necessary biological studies to understand how the technology could be effective and safe for people.

    Our lab is currently focused on developing the "Safe Direct Current Stimulation" technology, or SDCS. Unlike the currently available commercial neural prosthetic devices, such as cochlear implants, pacemakers, or Parkinson's deep brain stimulators that can only excite neurons, SDCS can excite, inhibit, and even sensitize them to input. This new technology opens a door to a wide range of applications that we are currently exploring along with device development: e.g. peripheral nerve stimulation for suppressing neuropathic pain, vestibular nerve stimulation to correct balance disorders, vagal nerve stimulation to suppress an asthma attack, and a host of other neuroprosthetic applications.

    M...edical Instrumentation MouthLab is a "tricorder" device that we invented here in the Machine Biointerface Lab. The device currently obtains all vital signs within 60s: Pulse rate, breathing rate, temperature, blood pressure, blood oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, and FEV1 (lung function) measurement. Because the device is in the mouth, it has access to saliva and to breath and we are focused now on expanding its capability to obtaining measures of dehydration and biomarkers that could be indicative of a wide range of internal disorders ranging from stress to kidney failure and even lung cancer.
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    Research Areas: medical instruments, bioelectricities, neuroengineering, nerve stimulation

  • Molecular Oncology Laboratory

    Our Molecular Oncology lab seeks to understand the genomic wiring of response and resistance to immunotherapy through integrative genomic, transcriptomic, single-cell and liquid biopsy analyses of tumor and immune evolution. Through comprehensive exome-wide sequence and genome-wide structural genomic analyses we have discovered that tumor cells evade immune surveillance by elimination of immunogenic mutations and associated neoantigens through chromosomal deletions. Additionally, we have developed non-invasive molecular platforms that incorporate ultra-sensitive measurements of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) to assess clonal dynamics during immunotherapy. These approaches have revealed distinct dynamic ctDNA and T cell repertoire patterns of clinical response and resistance that are superior to radiographic response assessments. Our work has provided the foundation for a molecular response-adaptive clinical trial, where therapeutic decisions are made not based on imaging but b...ased on molecular responses derived from liquid biopsies. Overall, our group focuses on studying the temporal and spatial order of the metastatic and immune cascade under the selective pressure of immune checkpoint blockade with the ultimate goal to translate this knowledge into “next-generation” clinical trials and change the way oncologists select patients for immunotherapy. view more

    Research Areas: integrative mutli-omic analyses, Cancer genomics, liquid biopsies, tumor evolution, lung cancer, immunogenomic biomarkers

    Principal Investigator

    Valsamo Anagnostou, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Morgan Grams Lab

    Dr. Morgan Grams and her colleagues are involved in a wide range of clinical research projects applying quantitative methods to multidimensional data to develop actionable clinical indicators. Along with Dr. Josef Coresh, Dr. Grams leads the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Prognosis Consortium, a global consortium of over 200 investigators and >11 million participants (https://ckdpc.org). They have developed and validated several risk calculators that are now widely used in clinical practice (https://ckdpcrisk.org). She holds a joint appointment in the Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she is a member of the Center of Drug Safety and Effectiveness. Her research in pharmacoepidemiology leverages electronic health records from multiple countries to evaluate the risks and benefits of commonly used medications across the spectrum of kidney function. Together with her team, Dr. Grams also focuses on identifying targetab...le pathways or biomarkers that underlie the development of chronic kidney disease using multi-omic approaches.



    Dr. Grams received the 2019 Frederick Brancati Mentoring Award. Currently, four of her mentees are supported by NIH K awards. More of their research can be found here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/browse/collection/40940579/?sort=date&direction=descending
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    Research Areas: organ donors, hyperglycemia, biomarkers, chronic kidney disease, health disparities

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Morgan Grams, M.D., M.H.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Qian-Li Xue Lab

    The primary area of statistical expertise in the Qian-Li Xue Lab is the development and application of statistical methods for: (1) handling the truncation of information on underlying or unobservable outcomes (e.g., disability) as a result of screening, (2) missing data, including outcome (e.g., frailty) censoring by a competing risk (e.g., mortality) and (3) trajectory analysis of multivariate outcomes. Other areas of methodologic research interests include multivariate, latent variable models. In Women's Health and Aging Studies, we have closely collaborated with scientific investigators on the design and analysis of longitudinal data relating biomarkers of inflammation, hormonal dysregulation and micronutrient deficiencies to the development and progression of frailty and disability, as well as characterizing the natural history of change in cognitive and physical function over time.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, disabilities, longitudinal data, hormonal dysregulation, women's health, inflammation, frailty, biostatistics, gerontology, latent variables

    Principal Investigator

    Qian-Li Xue, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Richard F. Ambinder Lab

    Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus are found in association with a variety of cancers. Our laboratory studies are aimed at better defining the role(s) of the virus in the pathogenesis of these diseases and the development of strategies to prevent, diagnose or treat them. We have become particularly interested in the unfolded protein response in activation of latent viral infection. Among the notions that we are exploring is the possibility that activation of virus-encoded enzymes will allow the targeted delivery of radation. In addition, we are investigating a variety of virus-related biomarkers including viral DNA, antibody responses, and cytokine measurements that may be clinically relevant.

    Research Areas: virology, antiviral therapy

  • Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian Lab

    Dr. Yegnasubramanian directs a Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics and Epigenetics at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (SKCCC), and is also the Director of the SKCCC Next Generation Sequencing Center.


    Our lab research is focused on understanding the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in carcinogenesis and disease progression, and to exploit this understanding in developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and risk stratification as well as in identifying targets for therapeutic intervention.

    Research Areas: cancer therapies, biomarkers, genetics, cancer, epigenetics

  • Steven Menez Lab

    Dr. Menez and his laboratory are interested in clinical and translational acute kidney injury (AKI) research, specifically with a focus on the transition between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Dr. Menez has investigated novel approaches to evaluate AKI using biomarkers of kidney injury, inflammation, and repair in the multi-center TRIBE-AKI and ASSESS-AKI Studies. Dr. Menez collaborates nationwide through the NIDDK-sponsored Kidney Precision Medicine Project, with a goal to improve the global understanding of kidney disease subgroups and identify new pathways and targets for novel therapies.



    Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, he has additionally investigated the impact of COVID19 on kidney health, including short-term outcomes including need for dialysis or in-hospital mortality, as well as longer-term outcomes post-hospital discharge.

    Research Areas: acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease

    Principal Investigator

    Steven Menez, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

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