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  • Aniket Sidhaye Lab

    Investigators in the Aniket Sidhaye Lab focus on the mechanism of nuclear hormone receptor action—with an emphasis on thyroid hormone receptors and PPAR-gamma obesity—and transitional care of patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, obesity, hormones, diabetes, transitional care, endocrinology, thyroid

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Aniket Sidhaye, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Berger Lab

    The Berger Lab's research is focused on understanding how multi-subunit assemblies use ATP for overcoming topological challenges within the chromosome and controlling the flow of genetic information. A long-term goal is to develop mechanistic models that explain in atomic level detail how macromolecular machines transduce chemical energy into force and motion, and to determine how cells exploit and control these complexes and their activities for initiating DNA replication, shaping chromosome superstructure and executing myriad other essential nucleic-acid transactions.

    Our principal approaches include a blend of structural (X-ray crystallography, single-particle EM, SAXS) and solution biochemical methods to define the architecture, function, evolution and regulation of biological complexes. We also have extensive interests in mechanistic enzymology and the study of small-molecule inhibitors of therapeutic potential, the development of chemical approaches to trapping weak protein/p...rotein and protein/nucleic acid interactions, and in using microfluidics and single-molecule approaches for biochemical investigations of protein dynamics. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, proteomics, ATP, DNA, genomics

  • Bradley Undem Lab

    Research in the Bradley Undem Lab centers around the hypothesis that the peripheral nervous system is directly involved in the processes of inflammation. This hypothesis is being studied primarily in the central airways and sympathetic ganglia. We are addressing this in a multidisciplinary fashion, using pharmacological, electrophysiological, biochemical and anatomical methodologies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, electrophysiology, inflammation, pharmacology, nervous system

    Principal Investigator

    Bradley Undem, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory

    The long-term goal of the Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory is to develop novel approaches to kill human pathogens, including bacterial pathogens and malaria parasites, with the ultimate objective of developing potential therapeutic agents.

    Toward this goal, we are pursuing studies of bacterial isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes comprising the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway essential in many human pathogens. Studies focus on understanding mechanism and regulation in the pathway toward the development of selective inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Our strategies for creating new anti-infective agents involve interdisciplinary research in the continuum of organic, biological and medicinal chemistry. Molecular biology, protein expression and biochemistry, and synthetic chemistry are key tools for our research.

    Research Areas: bacterial pathogens, biochemistry, enzymes, infectious disease, protein expression, synthetic chemistry, isoprenoid biosynthesis, malaria, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

  • Clifton O. Bingham III Lab

    Research in the Clifton O. Bingham III Lab focuses on defining clinical and biochemical disease phenotypes related to therapeutic responses in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; developing rational clinical trial designs to test new treatments; improving patient-reported outcome measures; evaluating novel imaging modalities for arthritis; and examining the role of oral health in inflammatory arthritis.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, imaging, osteoarthritis, clinical trials, inflammation, oral health, rheumatoid arthritis

    Principal Investigator

    Clifton O. Bingham, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Daniel Raben Laboratory

    The Raben Laboratory is focused on understanding the biochemistry and chemistry underlying the molecular aspects involved in regulating lipid metabolizing signaling enzymes and the physiological roles of this regulation. Controlling lipid-metabolizing enzymes involves modulating their sub-cellular distribution and their intrinsic enzymatic activity. Researchers in the Raben laboratory examine three families of lipid-metabolizing signaling enzymes: diacylglycerol kinases, phospholipases D, and phospholipases C.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, cellular signaling, chemistry

    Principal Investigator

    Daniel Raben, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • David Shortle Lab

    The principal research interest of the Shortle Lab is protein folding--how amino acid sequence information encodes three-dimensional structure. We are taking a combined experimental and computational approach to this longstanding puzzle of fundamental biochemistry. In addition, the laboratory is working to predict protein structure from sequence in ways that make the underlying physical chemistry transparent and the relative contributions of different interactions quantifiable.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, computational biology, protein folding, protein structure

  • Devreotes Laboratory

    The Devreotes Laboratory is engaged in genetic analysis of chemotaxis in eukaryotic cells. Our long-term goal is a complete description of the network controlling chemotactic behavior. We are analyzing combinations of deficiencies to understand interactions among network components and carrying out additional genetic screens to identify new pathways involved in chemotaxis. A comprehensive understanding of this fascinating process should lead to control of pathological conditions such as inflammation and cancer metastasis.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, genomics, inflammation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Devreotes, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Foster Lab

    The Foster Lab uses the tools of protein biochemistry and proteomics to tackle fundamental problems in the fields of cardiac preconditioning and heart failure. Protein networks are perturbed in heart disease in a manner that correlates only weakly with changes in mRNA transcripts. Moreover, proteomic techniques afford the systematic assessment of post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of proteins responsible for every aspect of heart function from electrical excitation to contraction and metabolism. Understanding the status of protein networks in the diseased state is, therefore, key to discovering new therapies.

    D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, and serves as Director of the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


    Research Areas: proteomics, protein biochemistry, heart failure, cardiology, cardiac preconditioning, cardiomyopathy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    D. Brian Foster, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • George Rose Lab

    The George Rose Lab investigates protein folding, the spontaneous disorder transition that takes place under physiological conditions. The protein polymer is flexible in its unfolded state but takes on a unique native, three-dimensional form when folded. We propose that the folded state is selected from a set number of structural possibilities, each corresponding to either a distinct hydrogen-bonded arrangement of ??helices or a strand of ??sheet.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, protein folding, protein structure

  • Green Lab

    Work in the Green Lab is centered on the ribosome. The overall fidelity of protein synthesis appears to be limited by the action of the ribosome, which is the two-subunit macromolecular machine responsible for decoding and translating messenger RNAs (mRNAs) into protein in all organisms. Our work is divided into four general project areas. The longest-standing research area concerns the interactions of eubacterial ribosomes and release factors. The goal is to understand the mechanism of action of release factors on the ribosome. A second research area involves biochemical and structure/function studies of the miRNA pathway, particularly the mechanism of action of the Argonaute proteins and their interacting factors. A third area of work in the lab is centered around regulation of eukaryotic translation, specifically in understanding the mechanism behind various mRNA quality control pathways and the interactions of proteins therein, as well as with the ribosome. The newest area of rese...arch in the lab extends our strengths in ribosome biochemistry to characterize the translation status of the cell using the ribosome profiling. We are using this technique to better understand the role of several factors involved in eukaryotic and prokaryotic translation fidelity. view less

    Research Areas: biochemistry, genomics, ribosome, RNA

  • Greider Lab

    The Greider lab uses biochemistry to study telomerase and cellular and organismal consequences of telomere dysfunction. Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage and chromosomal rearrangements. Conventional replication leads to telomere shortening, but telomere length is maintained by the enzyme telomerase. Telomerase is required for cells that undergo many rounds of divisions, especially tumor cells and some stem cells. The lab has generated telomerase null mice that are viable and show progressive telomere shortening for up to six generations. In the later generations, when telomeres are short, cells die via apoptosis or senescence. Crosses of these telomerase null mice to other tumor prone mice show that tumor formation can be greatly reduced by short telomeres. The lab also is using the telomerase null mice to explore the essential role of telomerase stem cell viability. Telomerase mutations cause autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita. People with ...this disease die of bone marrow failure, likely due to stem cell loss. The lab has developed a mouse model to study this disease. Future work in the lab will focus on identifying genes that induce DNA damage in response to short telomeres, identifying how telomeres are processed and how telomere elongation is regulated. view more

    Research Areas: telomerase, biochemistry, stem cells, cell biology, DNA

  • Herschel Wade Lab

    The emergence of structural genomics, proteomics and the large-scale sequencing of many genomes provides experimental access to regions of protein sequence-structure-function landscapes which have not been explored through traditional biochemical methods. Protein structure-function relationships can now be examined rigorously through the characterization of protein ensembles, which display structurally convergent--divergent solutions to analogous or very similar functional properties.

    In this modern biochemical context, the Herschel Wade Lab will use protein libraries, chemistry, biophysics, molecular biology and structural methods to examine the basis of molecular recognition in the context of several important biological problems, including structural and mechanistic aspects of multi-drug resistance, ligand-dependent molecular switches and metal ion homeostasis.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, genomics, drugs, molecular biology

  • Hey-Kyoung Lee Lab

    The Hey-Kyoung Lee Lab is interested in exploring the cellular and molecular changes that happen at synapses to allow memory storage. We use various techniques, including electrophysiological recording, biochemical and molecular analysis, and imaging, to understand the cellular and molecular changes that happen during synaptic plasticity.

    Currently, we are examining the molecular and cellular mechanisms of global homeostatic synaptic plasticity using sensory cortices as model systems. In particular, we found that loss of vision elicits global changes in excitatory synaptic transmission in the primary visual cortex. Vision loss also triggers specific synaptic changes in other primary sensory cortices, which we postulate underlies sensory compensation in the blind. One of our main research goals is to understand the mechanisms underlying such cross-modal synaptic plasticity.

    We are also interested in elucidating the events that occur in diseased brains. In collaboration with othe...r researchers, we are analyzing various mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, especially focusing on the possible alterations in synaptic plasticity mechanisms.
    view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, synaptic plasticity, memory, imaging, vision, molecular biology, Alzheimer's disease

    Principal Investigator

    Hey-Kyoung Lee, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Holland Lab

    Research in the Holland Lab focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control accurate chromosome distribution and the role that mitotic errors play in human health and disease. We use a combination of chemical biology, biochemistry, cell biology and genetically engineered mice to study pathways involved in mitosis and their effect on cell and organism physiology. One of our major goals is to develop cell and animal-based models to study the role of cell-division defects in genome instability and tumorigenesis.

    Research Areas: cancer, genomics, molecular biology

  • Inoue Lab

    Complexity in signaling networks is often derived from co-opting one set of molecules for multiple operations. Understanding how cells achieve such sophisticated processing using a finite set of molecules within a confined space--what we call the "signaling paradox"--is critical to biology and engineering as well as the emerging field of synthetic biology.

    In the Inoue Lab, we have recently developed a series of chemical-molecular tools that allow for inducible, quick-onset and specific perturbation of various signaling molecules. Using this novel technique in conjunction with fluorescence imaging, microfabricated devices, quantitative analysis and computational modeling, we are dissecting intricate signaling networks.

    In particular, we investigate positive-feedback mechanisms underlying the initiation of neutrophil chemotaxis (known as symmetry breaking), as well as spatio-temporally compartmentalized signaling of Ras and membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides. In parallel,... we also try to understand how cell morphology affects biochemical pathways inside cells. Ultimately, we will generate completely orthogonal machinery in cells to achieve existing, as well as novel, cellular functions. Our synthetic, multidisciplinary approach will elucidate the signaling paradox created by nature. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, signaling paradox, signaling networks, molecular biology, synthetic biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Takanari Inoue, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Jeffry Corden Laboratory

    Jeffry Corden's lab is using genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate the functional role of the C-terminal domain (CTD) in the biogenesis of mRNA. We use both yeast and mammalian systems to conduct research.

    A major effort in the lab is directed at studies of proteins that bind the CTD. Using the yeast two-hybrid approach, we've identified a family of proteins that interact with the CTD. These proteins are similar to the serine/arginine-rich proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing. A current focus of the laboratory is to determine how these proteins function in mRNA biogenesis and how CTD phosphorylation regulates this function. Other research in our lab investigates the mechanism by which RNA sequences in the nascent transcript trigger Pol II termination.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, C-terminal domain (CTD), genomics, yeast, RNA

    Principal Investigator

    Jeffry Corden, Ph.D.

    Department

    Molecular Biology and Genetics

  • Jeremy Nathans Laboratory

    The Jeremy Nathans Laboratory is focused on neural and vascular development, and the role of Frizzled receptors in mammalian development. We use gene manipulation in the mouse, cell culture models, and biochemical reconstitution to investigate the relevant molecular events underlying these processes, and to genetically mark and manipulate cells and tissues. Current experiments are aimed at defining additional Frizzled-regulated processes and elucidating the molecular mechanisms and cell biologic results of Frizzled signaling within these various contexts. Complementing these areas of biologic interest, we have ongoing technology development projects related to genetically manipulating and visualizing defined cell populations in the mouse, and quantitative analysis of mouse visual system function.

    Research Areas: vascular development, biochemistry, cell biology, neurodevelopment, genomics, Frizzled receptors, neuroscience

  • Lamichhane Lab

    The Lamichhane Lab strives to understand the fundamental mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to survive, grow and cause disease. Although our lab uses genetic and biochemical approaches to study this organism, we pursue questions irrespective of the expertise required to answer those questions. We work to identify the essential components of the peptidoglycan layer and how the physiology of this layer is maintained. We also explore what non-coding RNAs exist in M. tuberculosis and investigate what their relevance is to the physiology and virulence of this pathogen.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, infectious disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, genomics, tuberculosis, RNA

    Principal Investigator

    Gyanu Lamichhane, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Michael Caterina Lab

    The Caterina lab is focused on dissecting mechanisms underlying acute and chronic pain sensation. We use a wide range of approaches, including mouse genetics, imaging, electrophysiology, behavior, cell culture, biochemistry and neuroanatomy to tease apart the molecular and cellular contributors to pathological pain sensation. A few of the current projects in the lab focus on defining the roles of specific subpopulations of neuronal and non-neuronal cells to pain sensation, defining the role of RNA binding proteins in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, and understanding how rare skin diseases known as palmoplantar keratodermas lead to severe pain in the hands and feet.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, inflammation, pain

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Caterina, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurosurgery

  • Michael Edidin Lab

    The Michael Edidin Lab studies membrane dynamics and organization in cells from lymphocytes to epithelial cells using biochemistry, biophysics (especially fluorescence methods), cell biology, biochemistry and immunology. We are interested in transplantation immunology, particularly in the cell biology of class I MHC molecules, and are working to understand the relationship between plasma membrane biophysics and antigen presentation by MHC molecules. We are currently studying the clustering of T cell receptors for the antigen TCR.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, membrane biophysics, MHC molecules, antigens, T cells

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Edidin, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Michael Wolfgang Laboratory

    The Wolfgang Laboratory is interested in understanding the metabolic properties of neurons and glia at a mechanistic level in situ. Some of the most interesting, enigmatic and understudied cells in metabolic biochemistry are those of the nervous system. Defects in these pathways can lead to devastating neurological disease. Conversely, altering the metabolic properties of the nervous system can have surprisingly beneficial effects on the progression of some diseases. However, the mechanisms of these interactions are largely unknown.

    We use biochemical and molecular genetic techniques to study the molecular mechanisms that the nervous system uses to sense and respond to metabolic cues. We seek to understand the neurometabolic regulation of behavior and physiology in obesity, diabetes and neurological disease.

    Current areas of study include deconstructing neurometabolic pathways to understand the biochemistry of the nervous system and how these metabolic pathways impact animal beh...avior and physiology, metabolic heterogeneity and the evolution of metabolic adaptation. view more

    Research Areas: metabolic biochemistry, obesity, diabetes, genomics, neurology, nervous system, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Michael J. Wolfgang, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Nicholas Flavahan Lab

    The Nicholas Flavahan Lab primarily researches the cellular interactions and subcellular signaling pathways that control normal vascular function and regulate the initiation of vascular disease. We use biochemical and molecular analyses of cellular mediators and cell signaling mechanisms in cultured vascular cells, while also conducting physiological assessments and fluorescent microscopic imaging of signaling systems in isolated blood vessels. A major component of our research involves aterioles, tiny blood vessles that are responsible for controlling the peripheral resistance of the cardiovascular system, which help determine organ blood flow.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, Raynaud's phenomenon, vascular biology, vasospasms

  • Nicola Heller Lab

    Research in the Nicola Heller Lab focuses on the immunobiology of macrophages. Our team explores how these cells impact diseases with an inflammatory element, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity. Using a variety of techniques, including molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, mouse models and more, we study the role of IL-4/IL-13 signaling in asthma and allergic disease, as well as the role of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. Currently, we are researching the links between asthma and obesity, with a focus on the roles of gender and race.

    Research Areas: asthma, allergies, immunobiology, inflammation, macrophages

  • Photini Sinnis Lab

    Research in the Photini Sinnis Lab explores the fundamental biology of the pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria. Our team is focused on the sporozoite stage of Plasmodium, which is the infective stage of the malaria parasite, and the liver stages into which they develop. We use classic biochemistry, mutational analysis, and in vitro and in vivo assays to better understand the molecular interactions between the parasite and its mosquito and mammalian hosts. Our goal is to translate our findings to help develop treatments and a vaccine that target the malaria parasite.

    Research Areas: microbiology, biochemistry, infectious disease, parasites, malaria

    Principal Investigator

    Photini Sinnis, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Ryuya Fukunaga Lab

    The Fukunaga Lab uses multidisciplinary approaches to understand the cell biology, biogenesis and function of small silencing RNAs from the atomic to the organismal level.

    The lab studies how small silencing RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), are produced and how they function. Mutations in the small RNA genes or in the genes involved in the RNA pathways cause many diseases, including cancers. We use a combination of biochemistry, biophysics, fly genetics, cell culture, X-ray crystallography and next-generation sequencing to answer fundamental biological questions and also potentially lead to therapeutic applications to human diseases.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology, cell culture, genomics, RNA

    Principal Investigator

    Ryuya Fukunaga, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Sandra Gabelli Lab

    The Gabelli lab research is focused on structural, mechanistic and functional aspects of enzyme activation that play a role in the biology of human diseases such as cancer, parasitic infection and cardiovascular disease. Their work seeks to:

    1. Understand how molecular events at the recognition level coordinate and trigger events in the cells
    2. Translate structural and mechanistic information on protein:protein interactions at the cytoplasmic level into preventive and therapeutic treatment for human disease.

    To achieve a comprehensive understanding, they are studying cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions involved in regulation of pathways such as PI3K and Sodium Voltage gated channels. Their research integrates structural biology and chemical biology and it is focused on drug discovery for targeted therapies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, chemical biology, cell biology, structural biology, proteomics, cancer, diarrhea, diabetes, drugs, cellular signaling, inflammation, pharmacology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Sandra Gabelli, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sean T. Prigge Lab

    Current research in the Sean T. Prigge Lab explores the biochemical pathways found in the apicoplast, an essential organelle found in malaria parasites, using a combination of cell biology and genetic, biophysical and biochemical techniques. We are particularly focused on the pathways used for the biosynthesis and modification of fatty acids and associated enzyme cofactors, including pantothenate, lipoic acid, biotin and iron-sulfur clusters. We want to better understand how the cofactors are acquired and used, and whether they are essential for the growth of blood-stage malaria parasites.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, enzymes, immunology, apicoplasts, malaria, molecular microbiology

  • Sean Taverna Laboratory

    The Taverna Laboratory studies histone marks, such as lysine methylation and acetylation, and how they contribute to an epigenetic/histone code that dictates chromatin-templated functions like transcriptional activation and gene silencing. Our lab uses biochemistry and cell biology in a variety of model organisms to explore connections between gene regulation and proteins that write and read histone marks, many of which have clear links to human diseases like leukemia and other cancers. We also investigate links between small RNAs and histone marks involved in gene silencing.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, histone marks, cell biology, leukemia, cancer, epigenetics, eukaryotic cells, gene silencing, RNA

  • Seth Blackshaw Lab

    The Seth Blackshaw Lab uses functional genomics and proteomics to rapidly identify the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell specification and survival in both the retina and hypothalamus. We have profiled gene expression in both these tissues, from the start to the end of neurogenesis, characterizing the cellular expression patterns of more than 1,800 differentially expressed transcripts in both tissues. Working together with the lab of Heng Zhu in the Department of Pharmacology, we have also generated a protein microarray comprised of nearly 20,000 unique full-length human proteins, which we use to identify biochemical targets of developmentally important genes of interest.

    Research Areas: retina, central nervous system, biochemistry, hypothalamus, proteomics, genomics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory

    The Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory uses the developing spinal cord as our major paradigm to define the mechanisms that maintain an undifferentiated progenitor state and the molecular pathways that trigger their differentiation into neurons and glia. The major focus of the lab is the study of a new family of six-transmembrane proteins (6-TM GDEs) that play key roles in regulating neuronal and glial differentiation in the spinal cord. We recently discovered that the 6-TM GDEs release GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface through cleavage of the GPI-anchor. This discovery identifies 6-TM GDEs as the first vertebrate membrane bound GPI-cleaving enzymes that work at the cell surface to regulate GPI-anchored protein function. Current work in the lab involves defining how the 6-TM GDEs regulate cellular signaling events that control neuronal and glial differentiation and function, with a major focus on how GDE dysfunction relates to the onset and progression of disease. To solve the...se questions, we use an integrated approach that includes in vivo models, imaging, molecular biology, biochemistry, developmental biology, genetics and behavior. view less

    Research Areas: glia, biochemistry, neurons, imaging, developmental biology, genomics, spinal cord, behavior, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Shanthini Sockanathan, D.Phil.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Stephen Gould Laboratory

    The Gould Laboratory studies vesicles, known as exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs), that can be taken up by neighboring cells, completing a pathway of intercellular vesicle traffic.

    Our laboratory studies the molecular mechanisms of EMV biogenesis and uptake, and their contributions to cell polarity, cell-to-cell interactions, and intercellular signaling. We also examine the ways in which HIV and other retroviruses use the exosome biogenesis pathway for the formation of infectious virions, and the consequences of their EMV origin.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, EMV, HIV, vesicles, retroviruses

    Principal Investigator

    Stephen Gould, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Steven Claypool Lab

    Research in the Claypool Lab is focused on defining how lipids and membrane proteins interact to establish and maintain normal mitochondrial function and how derangements in this complex relationship result in pathophysiology. We have demonstrated that yeast lacking tafazzin recapitulates all of the phospholipid abnormalities observed in human patients and many of the mitochondrial defects.

    Another major project in our lab focuses on the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier that is required for oxidative phosphorylation. Researchers are studying how these novel interactions help establish normal mitochondrial function, the biochemical details of these associations, and whether disturbances in these assemblies can contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, proteomics, lipids, yeast, mitochondria, oxidative phosphorylation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Steven Claypool, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Structural Enzymology and Thermodynamics Group

    The Structural Enzymology and Thermodynamics Group uses a combination of molecular biology, biochemistry and structural biology to understand the catalytic mechanisms of several enzyme families. Additionally, researchers in the group are studying protein-ligand interactions using structural dynamics. They are able to apply their knowledge of the mechanisms of these enzymes and of binding energetics to develop targets for drug design.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, enzymes, structural biology, molecular biology

  • Susan Michaelis Lab

    The Michaelis Laboratory's research goal is to dissect fundamental cellular processes relevant to human health and disease, using yeast and mammalian cell biology, biochemistry and high-throughput genomic approaches. Our team studies the cell biology of lamin A and its role in the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Other research focuses on the core cellular machinery involved in recognition of misfolded proteins. Understanding cellular protein quality control machinery will ultimately help researchers devise treatments for protein misfolding diseases in which degradation is too efficient or not enough.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, protein folding, lamin A, aging, genomics, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, yeast

    Principal Investigator

    Susan Michaelis, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory

    The research in the Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory is focused on the molecular mechanisms that regulate copper concentration in normal and diseased human cells. Copper is essential for human cell homeostasis. It is required for embryonic development and neuronal function, and the disruption of copper transport in human cells results in severe multisystem disorders, such as Menkes disease and Wilson's disease. To understand the molecular mechanisms of copper homeostasis in normal and diseased human cells, we utilize a multidisciplinary approach involving biochemical and biophysical studies of molecules involved in copper transport, cell biological studies of copper signaling, and analysis of copper-induced pathologies using Wilson's disease gene knock-out mice.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, menkes disease, Wilson's disease, cell biology, multisystem disorders, physiology, copper, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Svetlana Lutsenko, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • William Agnew Laboratory

    The Agnew Laboratory examines the structure, mechanism and regulation of ion channels that mediate the action potential in nerve and muscle, as well as intracellular calcium concentrations. Much of our work has centered on voltage-activated sodium channels responsible for the inward currents of the action potential. These studies encompass biochemical, molecular biological and biophysical studies of Na channel structure, gating and conductance mechanisms, the stages of channel biosynthesis and assembly, and mechanisms linked to channel neuromodulation.

    In recent molecular cloning and expression studies, we have characterized mutations in the human muscle sodium channel that appear to underlie certain inherited myopathies. New studies being pursued in our group also address the questions of structure, receptor properties, and biophysical behavior of intracellular calcium release channels activated by inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate. These channels are expressed at extremely high levels ...in selected cells of the central nervous system, and may play a role in modulating neuronal excitability. view more

    Research Areas: central nervous system, neuronal excitability, biophysiology, biochemistry, sodium channels, ion channels, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    William Agnew, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Xiao Group

    The objective of the Xiao Group's research is to study the dynamics of cellular processes as they occur in real time at the single-molecule and single-cell level. The depth and breadth of our research requires an interdisciplinary approach, combining biological, biochemical and biophysical methods to address compelling biological problems quantitatively. We currently are focused on dynamics of the E. coli cell division complex assembly and the molecular mechanism in gene regulation.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, E. coli, cell biology, genomics, molecular biology

  • Zhaozhu Qiu Laboratory

    Ion channels are pore-forming membrane proteins gating the flow of ions across the cell membrane. Among their many functions, ion channels regulate cell volume, control epithelial fluid secretion, and generate the electrical impulses in our brain. The Qiu Lab employs a multi-disciplinary approach including high-throughput functional genomics, electrophysiology, biochemistry, and mouse genetics to discover novel ion channels and to elucidate their role in health and disease.

    Research Areas: ion channel, neurological disease, electrophysiology, functional genomics, sensory neuroscience

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Zhaozhu Qiu, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience
    Physiology

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