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Research Lab Results for biochemistry

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  • Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory

    Lab Website

    The long-term goal of the Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory is to develop novel approaches to ki...ll human pathogens, including bacterial pathogens and malaria parasites, with the ultimate objective of developing potential therapeutic agents.

    Toward this goal, we are pursuing studies of bacterial isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes comprising the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway essential in many human pathogens. Studies focus on understanding mechanism and regulation in the pathway toward the development of selective inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Our strategies for creating new anti-infective agents involve interdisciplinary research in the continuum of organic, biological and medicinal chemistry. Molecular biology, protein expression and biochemistry, and synthetic chemistry are key tools for our research.
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    Research Areas: bacterial pathogens, biochemistry, enzymes, infectious disease, protein expression, synthetic chemistry, isoprenoid biosynthesis, malaria, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology
  • Daniel Raben Laboratory

    Principal Investigator:
    Daniel Raben, Ph.D.
    Biological Chemistry

    The Raben Laboratory is focused on understanding the biochemistry and chemistry underlying the ...molecular aspects involved in regulating lipid metabolizing signaling enzymes and the physiological roles of this regulation. Controlling lipid-metabolizing enzymes involves modulating their sub-cellular distribution and their intrinsic enzymatic activity. Researchers in the Raben laboratory examine three families of lipid-metabolizing signaling enzymes: diacylglycerol kinases, phospholipases D, and phospholipases C. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, cellular signaling, chemistry
  • Foster Lab

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., M.Sc.
    Medicine

    The Foster Lab uses the tools of protein biochemistry and proteomics to tackle fundamental prob...lems in the fields of cardiac preconditioning and heart failure. Protein networks are perturbed in heart disease in a manner that correlates only weakly with changes in mRNA transcripts. Moreover, proteomic techniques afford the systematic assessment of post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of proteins responsible for every aspect of heart function from electrical excitation to contraction and metabolism. Understanding the status of protein networks in the diseased state is, therefore, key to discovering new therapies.

    D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, and serves as Director of the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


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    Research Areas: proteomics, protein biochemistry, heart failure, cardiology, cardiac preconditioning, cardiomyopathy
  • Green Lab

    Lab Website

    Work in the Green Lab is centered on the ribosome. The overall fidelity of protein synthesis ap...pears to be limited by the action of the ribosome, which is the two-subunit macromolecular machine responsible for decoding and translating messenger RNAs (mRNAs) into protein in all organisms. Our work is divided into four general project areas. The longest-standing research area concerns the interactions of eubacterial ribosomes and release factors. The goal is to understand the mechanism of action of release factors on the ribosome. A second research area involves biochemical and structure/function studies of the miRNA pathway, particularly the mechanism of action of the Argonaute proteins and their interacting factors. A third area of work in the lab is centered around regulation of eukaryotic translation, specifically in understanding the mechanism behind various mRNA quality control pathways and the interactions of proteins therein, as well as with the ribosome. The newest area of research in the lab extends our strengths in ribosome biochemistry to characterize the translation status of the cell using the ribosome profiling. We are using this technique to better understand the role of several factors involved in eukaryotic and prokaryotic translation fidelity. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, genomics, ribosome, RNA
  • Greider Lab

    Lab Website

    The Greider lab uses biochemistry to study telomerase and cellular and organismal consequences ...of telomere dysfunction. Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage and chromosomal rearrangements. Conventional replication leads to telomere shortening, but telomere length is maintained by the enzyme telomerase. Telomerase is required for cells that undergo many rounds of divisions, especially tumor cells and some stem cells. The lab has generated telomerase null mice that are viable and show progressive telomere shortening for up to six generations. In the later generations, when telomeres are short, cells die via apoptosis or senescence. Crosses of these telomerase null mice to other tumor prone mice show that tumor formation can be greatly reduced by short telomeres. The lab also is using the telomerase null mice to explore the essential role of telomerase stem cell viability. Telomerase mutations cause autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita. People with this disease die of bone marrow failure, likely due to stem cell loss. The lab has developed a mouse model to study this disease. Future work in the lab will focus on identifying genes that induce DNA damage in response to short telomeres, identifying how telomeres are processed and how telomere elongation is regulated. view more

    Research Areas: telomerase, biochemistry, stem cells, cell biology, DNA
  • Holland Lab

    Lab Website

    Research in the Holland Lab focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control accurate chromosom...e distribution and the role that mitotic errors play in human health and disease. We use a combination of chemical biology, biochemistry, cell biology and genetically engineered mice to study pathways involved in mitosis and their effect on cell and organism physiology. One of our major goals is to develop cell and animal-based models to study the role of cell-division defects in genome instability and tumorigenesis. view more

    Research Areas: cancer, genomics, molecular biology
  • Krishnan Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Mohan Krishnan, Ph.D., M.S.
    Pediatrics

    Dr. Krishnan, Assistant Professor, received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry-Biotechnology from the Un...iversity of Madras in 2008. He completed his postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois at Chicago. After he worked as Research Associate in Department of Pediatrics at the University of South Florida, Dr. Krishnan joined the faculty at JHU in May 2018. His lab investigates the pathophysiology of Transfusion-associated Necrotizing Enterocolitis (TANEC) and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) in premature infants who are at high risk of anemia and heavily transfused. Dr. Krishnan is dedicated to understanding the role of monocyte/macrophage in the neonate and investigating their inflammatory phenotype, function during anemia and/or RBC-transfusion associated NEC and SIRS. view more

    Research Areas: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Transfusion-associated Necrotizing Enterocolitis (TANEC), pediatrics
  • Michael Caterina Lab

    The Caterina lab is focused on dissecting mechanisms underlying acute and chronic pain sensatio...n. We use a wide range of approaches, including mouse genetics, imaging, electrophysiology, behavior, cell culture, biochemistry and neuroanatomy to tease apart the molecular and cellular contributors to pathological pain sensation. A few of the current projects in the lab focus on defining the roles of specific subpopulations of neuronal and non-neuronal cells to pain sensation, defining the role of RNA binding proteins in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, and understanding how rare skin diseases known as palmoplantar keratodermas lead to severe pain in the hands and feet. view more

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, inflammation, pain
  • Michael Wolfgang Laboratory

    The Wolfgang Laboratory is interested in understanding the metabolic properties of neurons and ...glia at a mechanistic level in situ. Some of the most interesting, enigmatic and understudied cells in metabolic biochemistry are those of the nervous system. Defects in these pathways can lead to devastating neurological disease. Conversely, altering the metabolic properties of the nervous system can have surprisingly beneficial effects on the progression of some diseases. However, the mechanisms of these interactions are largely unknown.

    We use biochemical and molecular genetic techniques to study the molecular mechanisms that the nervous system uses to sense and respond to metabolic cues. We seek to understand the neurometabolic regulation of behavior and physiology in obesity, diabetes and neurological disease.

    Current areas of study include deconstructing neurometabolic pathways to understand the biochemistry of the nervous system and how these metabolic pathways impact animal behavior and physiology, metabolic heterogeneity and the evolution of metabolic adaptation.
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    Research Areas: metabolic biochemistry, obesity, diabetes, genomics, neurology, nervous system, molecular biology
  • Nicola Heller Lab

    Lab Website

    Research in the Nicola Heller Lab focuses on the immunobiology of macrophages. Our team explore...s how these cells impact diseases with an inflammatory element, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity. Using a variety of techniques, including molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, mouse models and more, we study the role of IL-4/IL-13 signaling in asthma and allergic disease, as well as the role of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. Currently, we are researching the links between asthma and obesity, with a focus on the roles of gender and race. view more

    Research Areas: asthma, allergies, immunobiology, inflammation, macrophages
  • Ryuya Fukunaga Lab

    The Fukunaga Lab uses multidisciplinary approaches to understand the cell biology, biogenesis a...nd function of small silencing RNAs from the atomic to the organismal level.

    The lab studies how small silencing RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), are produced and how they function. Mutations in the small RNA genes or in the genes involved in the RNA pathways cause many diseases, including cancers. We use a combination of biochemistry, biophysics, fly genetics, cell culture, X-ray crystallography and next-generation sequencing to answer fundamental biological questions and also potentially lead to therapeutic applications to human diseases.
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    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology, cell culture, genomics, RNA
  • Sean Taverna Laboratory

    The Taverna Laboratory studies histone marks, such as lysine methylation and acetylation, and h...ow they contribute to an epigenetic/histone code that dictates chromatin-templated functions like transcriptional activation and gene silencing. Our lab uses biochemistry and cell biology in a variety of model organisms to explore connections between gene regulation and proteins that write and read histone marks, many of which have clear links to human diseases like leukemia and other cancers. We also investigate links between small RNAs and histone marks involved in gene silencing. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, histone marks, cell biology, leukemia, cancer, epigenetics, eukaryotic cells, gene silencing, RNA
  • Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory

    Lab Website

    The Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory uses the developing spinal cord as our major paradigm to d...efine the mechanisms that maintain an undifferentiated progenitor state and the molecular pathways that trigger their differentiation into neurons and glia. The major focus of the lab is the study of a new family of six-transmembrane proteins (6-TM GDEs) that play key roles in regulating neuronal and glial differentiation in the spinal cord. We recently discovered that the 6-TM GDEs release GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface through cleavage of the GPI-anchor. This discovery identifies 6-TM GDEs as the first vertebrate membrane bound GPI-cleaving enzymes that work at the cell surface to regulate GPI-anchored protein function. Current work in the lab involves defining how the 6-TM GDEs regulate cellular signaling events that control neuronal and glial differentiation and function, with a major focus on how GDE dysfunction relates to the onset and progression of disease. To solve these questions, we use an integrated approach that includes in vivo models, imaging, molecular biology, biochemistry, developmental biology, genetics and behavior. view more

    Research Areas: glia, biochemistry, neurons, imaging, developmental biology, genomics, spinal cord, behavior, molecular biology
  • Susan Michaelis Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Susan Michaelis, Ph.D.
    Cell Biology

    The Michaelis Laboratory's research goal is to dissect fundamental cellular processes relevant ...to human health and disease, using yeast and mammalian cell biology, biochemistry and high-throughput genomic approaches. Our team studies the cell biology of lamin A and its role in the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Other research focuses on the core cellular machinery involved in recognition of misfolded proteins. Understanding cellular protein quality control machinery will ultimately help researchers devise treatments for protein misfolding diseases in which degradation is too efficient or not enough. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, protein folding, lamin A, aging, genomics, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, yeast
  • Zhaozhu Qiu Laboratory

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Zhaozhu Qiu, Ph.D.
    Neuroscience
    Physiology

    Ion channels are pore-forming membrane proteins gating the flow of ions across the cell membran...e. Among their many functions, ion channels regulate cell volume, control epithelial fluid secretion, and generate the electrical impulses in our brain. The Qiu Lab employs a multi-disciplinary approach including high-throughput functional genomics, electrophysiology, biochemistry, and mouse genetics to discover novel ion channels and to elucidate their role in health and disease. view more

    Research Areas: ion channel, neurological disease, electrophysiology, functional genomics, sensory neuroscience
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