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Displaying 1 to 20 of 39 results for biochemistry

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  • Aniket Sidhaye Lab

    Investigators in the Aniket Sidhaye Lab focus on the mechanism of nuclear hormone receptor action—with an emphasis on thyroid hormone receptors and PPAR-gamma obesity—and transitional care of patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, obesity, hormones, diabetes, transitional care, endocrinology, thyroid

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Aniket Sidhaye, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Berger Lab

    The Berger Lab's research is focused on understanding how multi-subunit assemblies use ATP for overcoming topological challenges within the chromosome and controlling the flow of genetic information. A long-term goal is to develop mechanistic models that explain in atomic level detail how macromolecular machines transduce chemical energy into force and motion, and to determine how cells exploit and control these complexes and their activities for initiating DNA replication, shaping chromosome superstructure and executing myriad other essential nucleic-acid transactions.

    Our principal approaches include a blend of structural (X-ray crystallography, single-particle EM, SAXS) and solution biochemical methods to define the architecture, function, evolution and regulation of biological complexes. We also have extensive interests in mechanistic enzymology and the study of small-molecule inhibitors of therapeutic potential, the development of chemical approaches to trapping weak protein/p...rotein and protein/nucleic acid interactions, and in using microfluidics and single-molecule approaches for biochemical investigations of protein dynamics. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, proteomics, ATP, DNA, genomics

  • Bradley Undem Lab

    Research in the Bradley Undem Lab centers around the hypothesis that the peripheral nervous system is directly involved in the processes of inflammation. This hypothesis is being studied primarily in the central airways and sympathetic ganglia. We are addressing this in a multidisciplinary fashion, using pharmacological, electrophysiological, biochemical and anatomical methodologies.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, electrophysiology, inflammation, pharmacology, nervous system

    Principal Investigator

    Bradley Undem, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory

    The long-term goal of the Caren L. Freel Meyers Laboratory is to develop novel approaches to kill human pathogens, including bacterial pathogens and malaria parasites, with the ultimate objective of developing potential therapeutic agents.

    Toward this goal, we are pursuing studies of bacterial isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes comprising the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway essential in many human pathogens. Studies focus on understanding mechanism and regulation in the pathway toward the development of selective inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Our strategies for creating new anti-infective agents involve interdisciplinary research in the continuum of organic, biological and medicinal chemistry. Molecular biology, protein expression and biochemistry, and synthetic chemistry are key tools for our research.

    Research Areas: bacterial pathogens, biochemistry, enzymes, infectious disease, protein expression, synthetic chemistry, isoprenoid biosynthesis, malaria, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

  • Clifton O. Bingham III Lab

    Research in the Clifton O. Bingham III Lab focuses on defining clinical and biochemical disease phenotypes related to therapeutic responses in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; developing rational clinical trial designs to test new treatments; improving patient-reported outcome measures; evaluating novel imaging modalities for arthritis; and examining the role of oral health in inflammatory arthritis.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, imaging, osteoarthritis, clinical trials, inflammation, oral health, rheumatoid arthritis

    Principal Investigator

    Clifton O. Bingham, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Daniel Raben Laboratory

    The Raben Laboratory is focused on understanding the biochemistry and chemistry underlying the molecular aspects involved in regulating lipid metabolizing signaling enzymes and the physiological roles of this regulation. Controlling lipid-metabolizing enzymes involves modulating their sub-cellular distribution and their intrinsic enzymatic activity. Researchers in the Raben laboratory examine three families of lipid-metabolizing signaling enzymes: diacylglycerol kinases, phospholipases D, and phospholipases C.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, cellular signaling, chemistry

    Principal Investigator

    Daniel Raben, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • David Shortle Lab

    The principal research interest of the Shortle Lab is protein folding--how amino acid sequence information encodes three-dimensional structure. We are taking a combined experimental and computational approach to this longstanding puzzle of fundamental biochemistry. In addition, the laboratory is working to predict protein structure from sequence in ways that make the underlying physical chemistry transparent and the relative contributions of different interactions quantifiable.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, computational biology, protein folding, protein structure

  • Devreotes Laboratory

    The Devreotes Laboratory is engaged in genetic analysis of chemotaxis in eukaryotic cells. Our long-term goal is a complete description of the network controlling chemotactic behavior. We are analyzing combinations of deficiencies to understand interactions among network components and carrying out additional genetic screens to identify new pathways involved in chemotaxis. A comprehensive understanding of this fascinating process should lead to control of pathological conditions such as inflammation and cancer metastasis.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, genomics, inflammation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Devreotes, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Foster Lab

    The Foster Lab uses the tools of protein biochemistry and proteomics to tackle fundamental problems in the fields of cardiac preconditioning and heart failure. Protein networks are perturbed in heart disease in a manner that correlates only weakly with changes in mRNA transcripts. Moreover, proteomic techniques afford the systematic assessment of post-translational modifications that regulate the activity of proteins responsible for every aspect of heart function from electrical excitation to contraction and metabolism. Understanding the status of protein networks in the diseased state is, therefore, key to discovering new therapies.

    D. Brian Foster, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, and serves as Director of the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


    Research Areas: proteomics, protein biochemistry, heart failure, cardiology, cardiac preconditioning, cardiomyopathy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    D. Brian Foster, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • George Rose Lab

    The George Rose Lab investigates protein folding, the spontaneous disorder transition that takes place under physiological conditions. The protein polymer is flexible in its unfolded state but takes on a unique native, three-dimensional form when folded. We propose that the folded state is selected from a set number of structural possibilities, each corresponding to either a distinct hydrogen-bonded arrangement of ??helices or a strand of ??sheet.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, protein folding, protein structure

  • Green Lab

    Work in the Green Lab is centered on the ribosome. The overall fidelity of protein synthesis appears to be limited by the action of the ribosome, which is the two-subunit macromolecular machine responsible for decoding and translating messenger RNAs (mRNAs) into protein in all organisms. Our work is divided into four general project areas. The longest-standing research area concerns the interactions of eubacterial ribosomes and release factors. The goal is to understand the mechanism of action of release factors on the ribosome. A second research area involves biochemical and structure/function studies of the miRNA pathway, particularly the mechanism of action of the Argonaute proteins and their interacting factors. A third area of work in the lab is centered around regulation of eukaryotic translation, specifically in understanding the mechanism behind various mRNA quality control pathways and the interactions of proteins therein, as well as with the ribosome. The newest area of rese...arch in the lab extends our strengths in ribosome biochemistry to characterize the translation status of the cell using the ribosome profiling. We are using this technique to better understand the role of several factors involved in eukaryotic and prokaryotic translation fidelity. view less

    Research Areas: biochemistry, genomics, ribosome, RNA

  • Greider Lab

    The Greider lab uses biochemistry to study telomerase and cellular and organismal consequences of telomere dysfunction. Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage and chromosomal rearrangements. Conventional replication leads to telomere shortening, but telomere length is maintained by the enzyme telomerase. Telomerase is required for cells that undergo many rounds of divisions, especially tumor cells and some stem cells. The lab has generated telomerase null mice that are viable and show progressive telomere shortening for up to six generations. In the later generations, when telomeres are short, cells die via apoptosis or senescence. Crosses of these telomerase null mice to other tumor prone mice show that tumor formation can be greatly reduced by short telomeres. The lab also is using the telomerase null mice to explore the essential role of telomerase stem cell viability. Telomerase mutations cause autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita. People with ...this disease die of bone marrow failure, likely due to stem cell loss. The lab has developed a mouse model to study this disease. Future work in the lab will focus on identifying genes that induce DNA damage in response to short telomeres, identifying how telomeres are processed and how telomere elongation is regulated. view more

    Research Areas: telomerase, biochemistry, stem cells, cell biology, DNA

  • Herschel Wade Lab

    The emergence of structural genomics, proteomics and the large-scale sequencing of many genomes provides experimental access to regions of protein sequence-structure-function landscapes which have not been explored through traditional biochemical methods. Protein structure-function relationships can now be examined rigorously through the characterization of protein ensembles, which display structurally convergent--divergent solutions to analogous or very similar functional properties.

    In this modern biochemical context, the Herschel Wade Lab will use protein libraries, chemistry, biophysics, molecular biology and structural methods to examine the basis of molecular recognition in the context of several important biological problems, including structural and mechanistic aspects of multi-drug resistance, ligand-dependent molecular switches and metal ion homeostasis.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, genomics, drugs, molecular biology

  • Hey-Kyoung Lee Lab

    The Hey-Kyoung Lee Lab is interested in exploring the cellular and molecular changes that happen at synapses to allow memory storage. We use various techniques, including electrophysiological recording, biochemical and molecular analysis, and imaging, to understand the cellular and molecular changes that happen during synaptic plasticity.

    Currently, we are examining the molecular and cellular mechanisms of global homeostatic synaptic plasticity using sensory cortices as model systems. In particular, we found that loss of vision elicits global changes in excitatory synaptic transmission in the primary visual cortex. Vision loss also triggers specific synaptic changes in other primary sensory cortices, which we postulate underlies sensory compensation in the blind. One of our main research goals is to understand the mechanisms underlying such cross-modal synaptic plasticity.

    We are also interested in elucidating the events that occur in diseased brains. In collaboration with othe...r researchers, we are analyzing various mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, especially focusing on the possible alterations in synaptic plasticity mechanisms.
    view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, synaptic plasticity, memory, imaging, vision, molecular biology, Alzheimer's disease

    Principal Investigator

    Hey-Kyoung Lee, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Holland Lab

    Research in the Holland Lab focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control accurate chromosome distribution and the role that mitotic errors play in human health and disease. We use a combination of chemical biology, biochemistry, cell biology and genetically engineered mice to study pathways involved in mitosis and their effect on cell and organism physiology. One of our major goals is to develop cell and animal-based models to study the role of cell-division defects in genome instability and tumorigenesis.

    Research Areas: cancer, genomics, molecular biology

  • Inoue Lab

    Complexity in signaling networks is often derived from co-opting one set of molecules for multiple operations. Understanding how cells achieve such sophisticated processing using a finite set of molecules within a confined space--what we call the "signaling paradox"--is critical to biology and engineering as well as the emerging field of synthetic biology.

    In the Inoue Lab, we have recently developed a series of chemical-molecular tools that allow for inducible, quick-onset and specific perturbation of various signaling molecules. Using this novel technique in conjunction with fluorescence imaging, microfabricated devices, quantitative analysis and computational modeling, we are dissecting intricate signaling networks.

    In particular, we investigate positive-feedback mechanisms underlying the initiation of neutrophil chemotaxis (known as symmetry breaking), as well as spatio-temporally compartmentalized signaling of Ras and membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides. In parallel,... we also try to understand how cell morphology affects biochemical pathways inside cells. Ultimately, we will generate completely orthogonal machinery in cells to achieve existing, as well as novel, cellular functions. Our synthetic, multidisciplinary approach will elucidate the signaling paradox created by nature. view more

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, signaling paradox, signaling networks, molecular biology, synthetic biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Takanari Inoue, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Jeffry Corden Laboratory

    Jeffry Corden's lab is using genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate the functional role of the C-terminal domain (CTD) in the biogenesis of mRNA. We use both yeast and mammalian systems to conduct research.

    A major effort in the lab is directed at studies of proteins that bind the CTD. Using the yeast two-hybrid approach, we've identified a family of proteins that interact with the CTD. These proteins are similar to the serine/arginine-rich proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing. A current focus of the laboratory is to determine how these proteins function in mRNA biogenesis and how CTD phosphorylation regulates this function. Other research in our lab investigates the mechanism by which RNA sequences in the nascent transcript trigger Pol II termination.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, C-terminal domain (CTD), genomics, yeast, RNA

    Principal Investigator

    Jeffry Corden, Ph.D.

    Department

    Molecular Biology and Genetics

  • Jeremy Nathans Laboratory

    The Jeremy Nathans Laboratory is focused on neural and vascular development, and the role of Frizzled receptors in mammalian development. We use gene manipulation in the mouse, cell culture models, and biochemical reconstitution to investigate the relevant molecular events underlying these processes, and to genetically mark and manipulate cells and tissues. Current experiments are aimed at defining additional Frizzled-regulated processes and elucidating the molecular mechanisms and cell biologic results of Frizzled signaling within these various contexts. Complementing these areas of biologic interest, we have ongoing technology development projects related to genetically manipulating and visualizing defined cell populations in the mouse, and quantitative analysis of mouse visual system function.

    Research Areas: vascular development, biochemistry, cell biology, neurodevelopment, genomics, Frizzled receptors, neuroscience

  • Lamichhane Lab

    The Lamichhane Lab strives to understand the fundamental mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to survive, grow and cause disease. Although our lab uses genetic and biochemical approaches to study this organism, we pursue questions irrespective of the expertise required to answer those questions. We work to identify the essential components of the peptidoglycan layer and how the physiology of this layer is maintained. We also explore what non-coding RNAs exist in M. tuberculosis and investigate what their relevance is to the physiology and virulence of this pathogen.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, infectious disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, genomics, tuberculosis, RNA

    Principal Investigator

    Gyanu Lamichhane, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Michael Caterina Lab

    The Michael Caterina Lab studies the biological functions and biophysical characteristics of a group of ion channel proteins of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family--TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3 and TRPV4.

    These channels can be activated by warm or painfully hot temperatures, as well as by many nonthermal stimuli. Our lab is dissecting the biological contributions of these channels to thermosensory and nonthermosensory processes in both neuronal and nonneuronal cells. The goal of their research is to more broadly understand the biological and pathophysiological basis of chronic pain.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, inflammation, pain

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Caterina, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurosurgery

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