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Displaying 31 to 35 of 35 results for biochemistry

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  • Structural Enzymology and Thermodynamics Group

    The Structural Enzymology and Thermodynamics Group uses a combination of molecular biology, biochemistry and structural biology to understand the catalytic mechanisms of several enzyme families. Additionally, researchers in the group are studying protein-ligand interactions using structural dynamics. They are able to apply their knowledge of the mechanisms of these enzymes and of binding energetics to develop targets for drug design.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, enzymes, structural biology, molecular biology

  • Susan Michaelis Lab

    The Michaelis Laboratory's research goal is to dissect fundamental cellular processes relevant to human health and disease, using yeast and mammalian cell biology, biochemistry and high-throughput genomic approaches. Our team studies the cell biology of lamin A and its role in the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Other research focuses on the core cellular machinery involved in recognition of misfolded proteins. Understanding cellular protein quality control machinery will ultimately help researchers devise treatments for protein misfolding diseases in which degradation is too efficient or not enough.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, protein folding, lamin A, aging, genomics, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, yeast

    Principal Investigator

    Susan Michaelis, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory

    The research in the Svetlana Lutsenko Laboratory is focused on the molecular mechanisms that regulate copper concentration in normal and diseased human cells. Copper is essential for human cell homeostasis. It is required for embryonic development and neuronal function, and the disruption of copper transport in human cells results in severe multisystem disorders, such as Menkes disease and Wilson's disease. To understand the molecular mechanisms of copper homeostasis in normal and diseased human cells, we utilize a multidisciplinary approach involving biochemical and biophysical studies of molecules involved in copper transport, cell biological studies of copper signaling, and analysis of copper-induced pathologies using Wilson's disease gene knock-out mice.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, menkes disease, Wilson's disease, cell biology, multisystem disorders, physiology, copper, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Svetlana Lutsenko, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Xiao Group

    The objective of the Xiao Group's research is to study the dynamics of cellular processes as they occur in real time at the single-molecule and single-cell level. The depth and breadth of our research requires an interdisciplinary approach, combining biological, biochemical and biophysical methods to address compelling biological problems quantitatively. We currently are focused on dynamics of the E. coli cell division complex assembly and the molecular mechanism in gene regulation.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, E. coli, cell biology, genomics, molecular biology

  • Zhaozhu Qiu Laboratory

    Ion channels are pore-forming membrane proteins gating the flow of ions across the cell membrane. Among their many functions, ion channels regulate cell volume, control epithelial fluid secretion, and generate the electrical impulses in our brain. The Qiu Lab employs a multi-disciplinary approach including high-throughput functional genomics, electrophysiology, biochemistry, and mouse genetics to discover novel ion channels and to elucidate their role in health and disease.

    Research Areas: ion channel, neurological disease, electrophysiology, functional genomics, sensory neuroscience

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Zhaozhu Qiu, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience
    Physiology

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