Find a Research Lab

Enter a research interest, principal investigator or keyword

Displaying 1 to 28 of 28 results for behavior

Show: 10 · 20 · 50

  1. 1
  • Adam D. Sylvester Lab

    Research in the Adam D. Sylvester Lab primarily focuses on the way in which humans and primates move through the environment, with the aim of reconstructing the locomotor repertoire of extinct hominins and other primates. We use a quantitative approach that involves the statistical analysis of three-dimensional biological shapes, specifically musculoskeletal structures, and then link the anatomy to function and function to locomotor behavior.

    Research Areas: anatomy, biomechanics, locomotion, evolution, skeletal morphology

  • Ashikaga Lab

    We specialize in unconventional, multi-disciplinary approaches to studying the heart at the intersection of applied mathematics, physics and computer science. We focus on theory development that leads to new technology and value delivery to the society. Currently we have three research programs:

    1. Precision Medicine
    To develop a quantitative approach to personalized risk assessment for stroke and dementia based on patent-specific heart anatomy, function and blood flow.
    Disciplines: Cardiac Hemodynamics; Medical Imaging Physics; Continuum Mechanics; Computational Fluid Dynamics

    2. Information Theory
    To quantify and perturb cardiac fibrillation that emerges as a macro-scale behavior of the heart from micro-scale behaviors of inter-dependent components.
    Disciplines: Cardiac Electrophysiology; Spiral Wave; Information Theory; Complex Networks

    3. Artificial Intelligence
    To develop artificial intelligence algorithms to predict the future risk of heart attack, stroke and sudden... death, and to assist surgical interventions to prevent these outcomes.
    Disciplines: Medical Imaging Physics; Artificial Intelligence; Robotically Assisted Interventions
    view more

    Research Areas: complex systems, Computational Fluid Dynamics, spiral wave, artificial intelligence, informational theory

  • Cheryl Dennison Himmelfarb Lab

    Research in the Cheryl Dennison Lab aims to improve cardiovascular care for high-risk groups through multidisciplinary and health information technology-based methods. Our studies focus on reducing system and provider obstacles to implementing cardiovascular guidelines in various health care environments. Additional research interests include chronic illness management, quality of care, interdisciplinary teamwork and provider behavior.

    Research Areas: cardiovascular diseases, quality of care, information technology, health disparities

  • Cohen Lab

    The Cohen Lab studies neural circuits underlying reward, mood and decision making. We seek to understand how neural circuits control fundamental mammalian behaviors. Many disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, drug addiction and Parkinson's disease, appear to involve dysfunction of monoaminergic signaling. Using cell-type-specific tools and well-controlled behavioral tasks in mice, we aim to understand the function of monoaminergic circuits in behavior. We hope these basic discoveries will lead to an understanding of the biology of the brain and better treatments for disorders of the brain.

    Research Areas: neural circuits, brain, schizophrenia, mental illness, neuroscience, Parkinson's disease

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jeremiah Cohen, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Computational Neuroscience Laboratory

    In the computational neuroscience Laboratory, we construct quantitative models of biological nervous systems that are firmly based on their neurophysiology, neuroanatomy and behavior, and that are developed in close interaction with experimentalists. Our main interest is neuronal function at the system level, reflecting the interaction of subsystems to generate useful behavior. Modeling is particularly important for understanding this and other system-level functions, since it requires the interaction of several pathways and neural functions.

    One of the functions we study is selective attention--that is, the capability of higher animals to scan sensory input for the most important information and to discard all other. Models of the neuronal basis of visual selective attention are constructed by simulating them on digital computers and comparing the results with data obtained from the visual and somatosensory systems of primates. We pay particular attention to the mechanisms involvi...ng the implementation of neural mechanisms that make use of the temporal structure of neuronal firing, rather than just the average firing rate. view more

    Research Areas: neuronal function, neuroanatomy, selective attention, neurophysiology, nervous system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Ernst Niebur, M.Sc., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Daniel Kuespert Lab

    The Daniel Kuespert Lab conducts research on a range of topics within bioengineering. Past studies include exploring microscale behavior in amphiphilic fluid mixtures predicted by the SAFT equation as well as local order and microphase formation in fluids containing asymmetric molecules.

    Research Areas: bioengineering, engineering

    Principal Investigator

    Daniel Kuespert, M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • David Holtgrave Lab

    Work in the David Holtgrave Lab primarily assesses the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention and care interventions in an effort to apply our findings to HIV prevention policy making. Our team also conducts research on the intersection of infectious disease rates, risk behavior prevalence and social capital measures. We have also studied the economic effectiveness of smoking interventions.

    Research Areas: smoking cessation, infectious disease, AIDS, HIV, economics, public policy

    Principal Investigator

    David Holtgrave, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine
    Oncology

  • Devreotes Laboratory

    The Devreotes Laboratory is engaged in genetic analysis of chemotaxis in eukaryotic cells. Our long-term goal is a complete description of the network controlling chemotactic behavior. We are analyzing combinations of deficiencies to understand interactions among network components and carrying out additional genetic screens to identify new pathways involved in chemotaxis. A comprehensive understanding of this fascinating process should lead to control of pathological conditions such as inflammation and cancer metastasis.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, cell biology, chemotaxis, cancer, genomics, inflammation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Peter Devreotes, Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Dölen Lab

    The Dölen lab studies the synaptic and circuit mechanisms that enable social behaviors. We use a variety of techniques including whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology, viral mediated gene transfer, optogenetics, and behavior. We are also interested in understanding how these synaptic and circuit mechanisms are disrupted in autism and schizophrenia, diseases which are characterized by social cognition deficits. More recently we have become interested in the therapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs for diseases like addiction and PTSD that respond to social influence or are aggravated by social injury, We are currently using both transgenic mouse and octopus to model disease.

    Research Areas: autism, PTSD, LSD, social behavior, Oxytocin, MDMA, neuroscience, psychedelics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Gul Dolen, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Dong Laboratory

    The Dong Laboratory has identified many genes specifically expressed in primary sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Our lab uses multiple approaches, including molecular biology, mouse genetics, mouse behavior and electrophysiology, to study the function of these genes in pain and itch sensation. Other research in the lab examines the molecular mechanism of how skin mast cells sensitize sensory nerves under inflammatory states.

    Research Areas: skin cells, electrophysiology, genetics, itch, neuroscience, pain, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Xinzhong Dong, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Felicia Hill-Briggs Lab

    Research in the Felicia Hill-Briggs Lab focuses on assessment methods and clinical intervention in behavioral medicine, with an emphasis on patient self-management and outcomes in ethnic minorities with chronic diseases. We are interested in the application of problem-solving and decision-making models to self-management and health behavior change. Our recent research involves examining problem-solving training for cardiovascular disease risk self-management in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. We also have a long-standing interest in cognitive/neuropsychological processes in chronic diseases, translation of research to clinical practice settings and community-based settings, and evidence-based behavioral medicine.

    Research Areas: neuropsychology, psychology, African Americans, diabetes, self-management, behavioral medicine, evidence-based medicine

    Principal Investigator

    Felicia Hill-Briggs, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Haig Kazazian Lab

    The Kazazian Lab focuses on the biology of LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. Retrotransposons are pieces of genomic DNA that have the ability to duplicate themselves and insert into a new genomic location. Current studies use innovative DNA sequencing to locate all human-specific L1s in any genome. By understanding L1 biology, we hope to better understand the role of these genomes and their behavior in complex human disease, such as cancer and mental disorders. The lab is also examining how to carry out gene therapy of hemophilia A using AAV vectors.

    Research Areas: cell biology, cancer, retrotransposons, DNA, genomics, mental disorders

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Haig Kazazian, M.D.

    Department

    Pediatrics

  • Hoffmann Lab

    The Hoffmann Lab is focused on reducing TB and HIV morbidity and mortality in the low and middle income settings through behavioral and implementation science approaches. Work has focused on understanding individual-level behavior towards linkage to care and continued care engagement for HIV and TB and using this knowledge to develop approaches to increase HIV testing, linkage to care, HIV viral load suppression, and retention in care. Other work has focused on health system strategies to improve service delivery and improve adherence to best practice to guidelines-based care. The group's research includes work on the general population, corrections inmates and ex-inmates, men at risk for HIV, and recently hospitalized individuals. Most of the research has been in South Africa and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Research Areas: care continuum, HIV, behavioral health, implementation science, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    Christopher Hoffmann, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jonathan Zenilman Lab

    The Jonathan Zenilman lab conducts research related to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). We are working to develop biological markers for sexual behavior to use in other research. The lab studies sexual risk behaviors in highly vulnerable populations and studies datasets from the Baltimore City Health Department to understand STD trends and behaviors. Additionally, we study nosocomial infections at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, with a focus on developing an antimicrobial control program. We also conduct clinical research related to the natural history and microbiology of chronic wounds in the outpatient setting.

    Research Areas: behavioral research, biomarkers, sexually transmitted diseases, nosocomial infections

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Zenilman, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kathleen Cullen Lab

    We are continually in motion. This self-motion is sensed by the vestibular system, which contributes to an impressive range of brain functions, from the most automatic reflexes to spatial perception and motor coordination. The objective of Dr. Cullen's lab's research program is to understand the mechanisms by which self-motion (vestibular) information is encoded and then integrated with signals from other modalities to ensure accurate perception and control of gaze and posture. Our studies investigate the sensorimotor transformations required for the control of movement, by tracing the coding of vestibular stimuli from peripheral afferents, to behaviorally-contingent responses in central pathways, to the readout of accurate perception and behavior. Our experimental approach is multidisciplinary and includes a combination of behavioral, neurophysiological and computational approaches in alert behaving non-human primates and mice. Funding for the laboratory has been and is provided by th...e Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), The National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), FQRNT / FQRSC (Quebec). view more

    Research Areas: otolaryngology, biomedical engineering, surgery, neuroscience

  • Keri Martinowich Laboratory

    Neural plasticity allows for physiological changes in the brain during both development and in adulthood. The Keri Martinowich Laboratory studies how specific forms of plasticity contribute to regulation of circuits that mediate complex brain function and behavior in order to define how deficits in these processes lead to psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. Current projects focus on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family implicated in survival, maturation and differentiation of numerous cell types, synaptogenesis and regulation of dendritic morphology. BDNF is a key regulator of synaptic plasticity both in the developing and adult brain. These studies aim to contribute to the long-term goal of understanding how neural plasticity contributes to the function of circuits mediating complex brain function and behavior.

    Research Areas: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurodevelopment, brain, neural plasticity, mental illness

  • Marshall Shuler Laboratory

    The Marshall Shuler Laboratory aims to understand the means by which brain reward systems convey reward value, expectancy, quality, probability and utility, and the rules by which such activity is used to affect synaptic weight within brain networks to encode stimulus-action associations. We use an interdisciplinary approach combining multisite recordings of neural activity, targeted pharmacological manipulation, viral-mediated gene transfer and behavior to study the neural mechanisms of reward-based interval learning in the primary visual cortex.

    Research Areas: neural circuits, reward-based systems, brain, vision, pharmacology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Marshall Shuler, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Michael Caterina Lab

    The Caterina lab is focused on dissecting mechanisms underlying acute and chronic pain sensation. We use a wide range of approaches, including mouse genetics, imaging, electrophysiology, behavior, cell culture, biochemistry and neuroanatomy to tease apart the molecular and cellular contributors to pathological pain sensation. A few of the current projects in the lab focus on defining the roles of specific subpopulations of neuronal and non-neuronal cells to pain sensation, defining the role of RNA binding proteins in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, and understanding how rare skin diseases known as palmoplantar keratodermas lead to severe pain in the hands and feet.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, inflammation, pain

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Caterina, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurosurgery

  • Michael Wolfgang Laboratory

    The Wolfgang Laboratory is interested in understanding the metabolic properties of neurons and glia at a mechanistic level in situ. Some of the most interesting, enigmatic and understudied cells in metabolic biochemistry are those of the nervous system. Defects in these pathways can lead to devastating neurological disease. Conversely, altering the metabolic properties of the nervous system can have surprisingly beneficial effects on the progression of some diseases. However, the mechanisms of these interactions are largely unknown.

    We use biochemical and molecular genetic techniques to study the molecular mechanisms that the nervous system uses to sense and respond to metabolic cues. We seek to understand the neurometabolic regulation of behavior and physiology in obesity, diabetes and neurological disease.

    Current areas of study include deconstructing neurometabolic pathways to understand the biochemistry of the nervous system and how these metabolic pathways impact animal beh...avior and physiology, metabolic heterogeneity and the evolution of metabolic adaptation. view more

    Research Areas: metabolic biochemistry, obesity, diabetes, genomics, neurology, nervous system, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Michael J. Wolfgang, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory

    The Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory is interested in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental diseases such as schizophrenia and autism. The major focus of our laboratory is to evaluate how adverse environmental factors and vulnerable genes interact to affect brain and behavior development. We address these experimental questions by using methods of cell and molecular biology, neuroimmunology, neurochemistry, psychopharmacology and developmental psychobiology. The current projects in our laboratory are: (1) Genetic risk factors in neuron-astrocyte interaction during neurodevelopment, (2) Gene-environment interplay in the pathogenesis of psychiatric conditions, and (3) The neuroimmune interactions in abnormal neurodevelopment

    Research Areas: autism, immunology, neurobiology, cell biology, neurodevelopment, developmental psychobiology, schizophrenia, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

  • Molecular Mechanisms of Cellular Mechanosensing (Robinson Lab)

    The Robinson Lab studies the way in which mechanical stress guide and direct the behavior of cells, including when they are part of tissues, organs and organ systems.

    Research Areas: cellular mechanosensing, tissues, organs, molecular biology

  • Neuroimaging and Modulation Laboratory (NIMLAB)

    The neuroimaging and Modulation Laboratory (NIMLAB) investigates neural correlates of cognition and behavior using neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and neuromodulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We are looking in depth at the contributions of the cerebellum and cerebro-cerebellar circuits to cognition; the effects of chronic heavy alcohol consumption on cognition and brain activation underlying cognitive function; how aging in humans affects neural systems that are important for associative learning and stimulus awareness; and the integration of transcranial magnetic stimulation with functional MRI.

    Research Areas: cognition, alcohol, functional magnetic resonance imaging, imaging, aging, neuroscience, neuroimaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    John Desmond, M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurology

  • O'Connor Lab

    How do brain dynamics give rise to our sensory experience of the world? The O'Connor lab works to answer this question by taking advantage of the fact that key architectural features of the mammalian brain are similar across species. This allows us to leverage the power of mouse genetics to monitor and manipulate genetically and functionally defined brain circuits during perception. We train mice to perform simple perceptual tasks. By using quantitative behavior, optogenetic and chemical-genetic gain- and loss-of-function perturbations, in vivo two-photon imaging, and electrophysiology, we assemble a description of the relationship between neural circuit function and perception. We work in the mouse tactile system to capitalize on an accessible mammalian circuit with a precise mapping between the sensory periphery and multiple brain areas. Our mission is to reveal the neural circuit foundations of sensory perception; to provide a framework to understand how circuit dysfunction causes ...mental and behavioral aspects of neuropsychiatric illness; and to help others fulfill creative potential and contribute to human knowledge. view less

    Research Areas: brain, mental illness, neuroscience, perception

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Daniel O'Connor, M.A., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Rong Li Lab

    Research in the Rong Li Lab aims to better understand the fundamental laws that regulate the behavior and interactions of cellular systems. Our team is currently examining how cells consolidate their damaged proteins and prevent them from spreading freely — work aimed at understanding how to better treat diseases such as Alzheimer’s and ALS. We are also applying insights gained through basic research to better understand diseases such as cancer and polycystic kidney disease.

    Research Areas: cell biology, ALS, kidney diseases, cancer, cellular dynamics, molecular biology, Alzheimer's disease

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Rong Li, M.S., Ph.D.

    Department

    Cell Biology

  • Sarah Clever Lab

    Work in the Sarah Clever Lab focuses on medical education, patient-provider communication and the role of shared decision-making in patient recovery. We recently examined the ethical dilemmas of caring for “influential” patients whose attributes and characteristics (for example, social status, occupation, or position), coupled with their behavior, have the potential to significantly affect a clinician's judgment or actions.

    Research Areas: medical education, medical decision making, patient-provider relationships

    Principal Investigator

    Sarah Clever, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory

    The Shanthini Sockanathan Laboratory uses the developing spinal cord as our major paradigm to define the mechanisms that maintain an undifferentiated progenitor state and the molecular pathways that trigger their differentiation into neurons and glia. The major focus of the lab is the study of a new family of six-transmembrane proteins (6-TM GDEs) that play key roles in regulating neuronal and glial differentiation in the spinal cord. We recently discovered that the 6-TM GDEs release GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface through cleavage of the GPI-anchor. This discovery identifies 6-TM GDEs as the first vertebrate membrane bound GPI-cleaving enzymes that work at the cell surface to regulate GPI-anchored protein function. Current work in the lab involves defining how the 6-TM GDEs regulate cellular signaling events that control neuronal and glial differentiation and function, with a major focus on how GDE dysfunction relates to the onset and progression of disease. To solve the...se questions, we use an integrated approach that includes in vivo models, imaging, molecular biology, biochemistry, developmental biology, genetics and behavior. view less

    Research Areas: glia, biochemistry, neurons, imaging, developmental biology, genomics, spinal cord, behavior, molecular biology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Shanthini Sockanathan, D.Phil.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • William Agnew Laboratory

    The Agnew Laboratory examines the structure, mechanism and regulation of ion channels that mediate the action potential in nerve and muscle, as well as intracellular calcium concentrations. Much of our work has centered on voltage-activated sodium channels responsible for the inward currents of the action potential. These studies encompass biochemical, molecular biological and biophysical studies of Na channel structure, gating and conductance mechanisms, the stages of channel biosynthesis and assembly, and mechanisms linked to channel neuromodulation.

    In recent molecular cloning and expression studies, we have characterized mutations in the human muscle sodium channel that appear to underlie certain inherited myopathies. New studies being pursued in our group also address the questions of structure, receptor properties, and biophysical behavior of intracellular calcium release channels activated by inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate. These channels are expressed at extremely high levels ...in selected cells of the central nervous system, and may play a role in modulating neuronal excitability. view more

    Research Areas: central nervous system, neuronal excitability, biophysiology, biochemistry, sodium channels, ion channels, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    William Agnew, Ph.D.

    Department

    Physiology

  • Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute

    The Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute is dedicated to the study of the neural mechanisms of higher brain functions using modern neurophysiological, anatomical and computational techniques. Our researchers use various approaches to understand information processing and its influence on perception, memory, abstract thought, complex behavior and consciousness. Systems and cognitive laboratories use neurophysiology, brain imaging and psychophysics to develop a quantitative, network-level understanding of cognitive information processing. Other researchers use analytical approaches such as system identification, dimensionality reduction, information theory and network modeling to understand information processing. Other areas of research in the Institute include the study of how visual and tactile information processing leads to perception and understanding of two- and three-dimensional objects. Another focus is on neural processing and recognition of speech and other complex sounds. St...ill other laboratories study neural mechanisms of attention, memory formation, motor learning, decision-making and executive control of behavior. view less

    Research Areas: brain, neurophysiology, consciousness, neuroscience, perception

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Charles Connor, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  1. 1