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Displaying 11 to 20 of 26 results for behavior

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  • Haig Kazazian Lab

    The Kazazian Lab focuses on the biology of LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. Retrotransposons are pieces of genomic DNA that have the ability to duplicate themselves and insert into a new genomic location. Current studies use innovative DNA sequencing to locate all human-specific L1s in any genome. By understanding L1 biology, we hope to better understand the role of these genomes and their behavior in complex human disease, such as cancer and mental disorders. The lab is also examining how to carry out gene therapy of hemophilia A using AAV vectors.

    Research Areas: cell biology, cancer, retrotransposons, DNA, genomics, mental disorders

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Haig Kazazian, M.D.

    Department

    Pediatrics

  • Hoffmann Lab

    The Hoffmann Lab is focused on reducing TB and HIV morbidity and mortality in the low and middle income settings through behavioral and implementation science approaches. Work has focused on understanding individual-level behavior towards linkage to care and continued care engagement for HIV and TB and using this knowledge to develop approaches to increase HIV testing, linkage to care, HIV viral load suppression, and retention in care. Other work has focused on health system strategies to improve service delivery and improve adherence to best practice to guidelines-based care. The group's research includes work on the general population, corrections inmates and ex-inmates, men at risk for HIV, and recently hospitalized individuals. Most of the research has been in South Africa and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Research Areas: care continuum, HIV, behavioral health, implementation science, tuberculosis

    Principal Investigator

    Christopher Hoffmann, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jonathan Zenilman Lab

    The Jonathan Zenilman lab conducts research related to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). We are working to develop biological markers for sexual behavior to use in other research. The lab studies sexual risk behaviors in highly vulnerable populations and studies datasets from the Baltimore City Health Department to understand STD trends and behaviors. Additionally, we study nosocomial infections at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, with a focus on developing an antimicrobial control program. We also conduct clinical research related to the natural history and microbiology of chronic wounds in the outpatient setting.

    Research Areas: behavioral research, biomarkers, sexually transmitted diseases, nosocomial infections

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Zenilman, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Kathleen Cullen Lab

    We are continually in motion. This self-motion is sensed by the vestibular system, which contributes to an impressive range of brain functions, from the most automatic reflexes to spatial perception and motor coordination. The objective of Dr. Cullen's lab's research program is to understand the mechanisms by which self-motion (vestibular) information is encoded and then integrated with signals from other modalities to ensure accurate perception and control of gaze and posture. Our studies investigate the sensorimotor transformations required for the control of movement, by tracing the coding of vestibular stimuli from peripheral afferents, to behaviorally-contingent responses in central pathways, to the readout of accurate perception and behavior. Our experimental approach is multidisciplinary and includes a combination of behavioral, neurophysiological and computational approaches in alert behaving non-human primates and mice. Funding for the laboratory has been and is provided by th...e Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), The National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), FQRNT / FQRSC (Quebec). view more

    Research Areas: otolaryngology, biomedical engineering, surgery, neuroscience

  • Keri Martinowich Laboratory

    Neural plasticity allows for physiological changes in the brain during both development and in adulthood. The Keri Martinowich Laboratory studies how specific forms of plasticity contribute to regulation of circuits that mediate complex brain function and behavior in order to define how deficits in these processes lead to psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. Current projects focus on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family implicated in survival, maturation and differentiation of numerous cell types, synaptogenesis and regulation of dendritic morphology. BDNF is a key regulator of synaptic plasticity both in the developing and adult brain. These studies aim to contribute to the long-term goal of understanding how neural plasticity contributes to the function of circuits mediating complex brain function and behavior.

    Research Areas: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurodevelopment, brain, neural plasticity, mental illness

  • Marshall Shuler Laboratory

    The Marshall Shuler Laboratory aims to understand the means by which brain reward systems convey reward value, expectancy, quality, probability and utility, and the rules by which such activity is used to affect synaptic weight within brain networks to encode stimulus-action associations. We use an interdisciplinary approach combining multisite recordings of neural activity, targeted pharmacological manipulation, viral-mediated gene transfer and behavior to study the neural mechanisms of reward-based interval learning in the primary visual cortex.

    Research Areas: neural circuits, reward-based systems, brain, vision, pharmacology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Marshall Shuler, Ph.D.

    Department

    Neuroscience

  • Michael Caterina Lab

    The Caterina lab is focused on dissecting mechanisms underlying acute and chronic pain sensation. We use a wide range of approaches, including mouse genetics, imaging, electrophysiology, behavior, cell culture, biochemistry and neuroanatomy to tease apart the molecular and cellular contributors to pathological pain sensation. A few of the current projects in the lab focus on defining the roles of specific subpopulations of neuronal and non-neuronal cells to pain sensation, defining the role of RNA binding proteins in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, and understanding how rare skin diseases known as palmoplantar keratodermas lead to severe pain in the hands and feet.

    Research Areas: biophysics, biochemistry, proteomics, inflammation, pain

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Caterina, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Neurosurgery

  • Michael Wolfgang Laboratory

    The Wolfgang Laboratory is interested in understanding the metabolic properties of neurons and glia at a mechanistic level in situ. Some of the most interesting, enigmatic and understudied cells in metabolic biochemistry are those of the nervous system. Defects in these pathways can lead to devastating neurological disease. Conversely, altering the metabolic properties of the nervous system can have surprisingly beneficial effects on the progression of some diseases. However, the mechanisms of these interactions are largely unknown.

    We use biochemical and molecular genetic techniques to study the molecular mechanisms that the nervous system uses to sense and respond to metabolic cues. We seek to understand the neurometabolic regulation of behavior and physiology in obesity, diabetes and neurological disease.

    Current areas of study include deconstructing neurometabolic pathways to understand the biochemistry of the nervous system and how these metabolic pathways impact animal beh...avior and physiology, metabolic heterogeneity and the evolution of metabolic adaptation. view more

    Research Areas: metabolic biochemistry, obesity, diabetes, genomics, neurology, nervous system, molecular biology

    Principal Investigator

    Michael J. Wolfgang, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biological Chemistry

  • Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory

    The Mikhail Pletnikov Laboratory is interested in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental diseases such as schizophrenia and autism. The major focus of our laboratory is to evaluate how adverse environmental factors and vulnerable genes interact to affect brain and behavior development. We address these experimental questions by using methods of cell and molecular biology, neuroimmunology, neurochemistry, psychopharmacology and developmental psychobiology. The current projects in our laboratory are: (1) Genetic risk factors in neuron-astrocyte interaction during neurodevelopment, (2) Gene-environment interplay in the pathogenesis of psychiatric conditions, and (3) The neuroimmune interactions in abnormal neurodevelopment

    Research Areas: autism, immunology, neurobiology, cell biology, neurodevelopment, developmental psychobiology, schizophrenia, pharmacology, chemistry, molecular biology

  • Molecular Mechanisms of Cellular Mechanosensing (Robinson Lab)

    The Robinson Lab studies the way in which mechanical stress guide and direct the behavior of cells, including when they are part of tissues, organs and organ systems.

    Research Areas: cellular mechanosensing, tissues, organs, molecular biology

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