Skip Navigation

COVID-19: We are vaccinating patients ages 12+. Learn more:

Vaccines, Boosters & Additional Doses | Testing | Patient Care | Visitor Guidelines | Coronavirus | Self-Checker | Email Alerts

 

Philips Respironics issued a recall for some CPAP and BiLevel PAP devices and mechanical ventilators. Learn more.

Find a Research Lab

Research Lab Results for autoimmune

Displaying 1 to 10 of 20 results
Results per page:
  • Alan Baer Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Alan Baer, M.D.
    Medicine

    Research in the Alan Baer Lab focuses on Sjogren's syndrome. Previously, we conducted the Sjogren's International Registry (SICCA), enrolling 300 patients and creating a valuable source of clinical data and biospecimens for research we're conducting with colleagues at Johns Hopkins and the University of California-San Francisco. Currently, we're conducting a longitudinal observational study of patients with Sjogren's syndrome. We're also collaborating with Dr. Ben Larman in the Department of Pathology, using phage immuno-precipation sequencing to work on a characterization of the complete autoantibody repertoire in Sjogren's syndrome patients.

    Research Areas: autoantibodies, Sjogren's syndrome, autoimmune rheumatic diseases, observational data
  • Ana-Marie Orbai Lab

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Ana-Maria Orbai, M.D., M.H.S.
    Medicine

    The Ana-Marie Orbai Lab focuses on inflammatory arthritis. Current clinical research projects in the lab examine patient symptoms and experiences in rheumatic diseases and inflammatory arthritis. We focus on stiffness in rheumatoid arthritis and patient-reported outcomes. Previous research in the lab focused on systemic lupus erythemaous (SLE).

    Research Areas: autoimmune rheumatic diseases, arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis
  • Antony Rosen Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Antony Rosen, M.B.Ch.B., M.S.
    Medicine

    Research in the Antony Rosen Lab investigates the mechanisms shared by the autoimmune rheumatic diseases such as lupus, myositis, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and SjogrenÕs syndrome. We focus on the fate of autoantigens in target cells during various circumstances, such as viral infection, relevant immune effector pathways and exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Our recent research has sought to define the traits of autoantibodies that enable them to induce cellular or molecular dysfunction. We also work to better understand the mechanisms that form the striking connections between autoimmunity and cancer.

    Research Areas: myositis, lupus, rheumatology, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, autoimmune rheumatic diseases, rheumatoid arthritis
  • Erika Darrah Lab

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Erika Darrah, Ph.D.
    Medicine

    The Erika Darrah Lab is primarily interested in the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with a particular focus on the peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes. We’re focused on understanding the development of PAD4-activating autoantibodies over time and how they contribute to the development of erosive disease. Studies are underway to determine if the newly discovered antibody is mimicking a naturally occurring PAD4 binding partner and to identify potentially pro-inflammatory effects of citrullinated proteins on effector cells of the immune system.

    Research Areas: antibodies, autoimmune diseases, peptidylarginine deiminase enzymes, rheumatoid arthritis
  • Felipe Andrade Laboratory

    Principal Investigator:
    Felipe Andrade, M.D., Ph.D.
    Medicine

    Research in the laboratory of Felipe Andrade, M.D., Ph.D., focuses on the mechanisms of systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly as they relate to the role of cytotoxic granule proteases in autoimmunity and viral clearance, mechanisms of autoantigen citrullination and pathways that control immune effector functions in autoimmune diseases. We currently focus on two principal areas: (1) defining the mechanisms that generate citrullinated autoantigens in vivo in rheumatoid arthritis and (2) understanding the pathways that control the activity of the peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes in human neutrophils.

    Research Areas: autoantigens, autoimmune diseases, cytotoxic granule proteases, peptidylarginine deiminase enzymes, rheumatoid arthritis
  • Fredrick Wigley Lab

    Principal Investigator:
    Fredrick Wigley, M.D.
    Medicine

    The Frederick Wigley Lab is interested in the signs, symptoms and causes of scleroderma. We are testing new treatments for RaynaudÕs phenomenon and scleroderma. Understanding the treatment approach to Raynaud's phenomenon and associated ischemia and how to prevent digital ulcers is important for clinicians caring for these patients. Work in our lab has provided guidance in the management of Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischemic ulcers, including options for the practical pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions.

    Research Areas: Raynaud's phenomenon, rheumatology, scleroderma, autoimmune diseases, systemic sclerosis, ischemic ulcers
  • IBD and Autoimmune Liver Diseases Laboratory

    Lab Website
    Principal Investigator:
    Xu Li, Ph.D.
    Medicine

    Investigators in the IBD and Autoimmune Liver Diseases Laboratory conduct basic and translational research in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and autoimmune liver diseases. One area of focus is discovering and developing biomarkers for diagnosing and prognosticating IBD and other autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). We also are exploring the molecular pathogenesis of—and developing novel therapies for—IBD. In addition, we are working to understand the molecular reason why many IBD patients fail to respond to mainstay drug therapies—and to develop diagnostic assays that can predict non-responders before starting them on those therapies. These biomarker studies have led to our application for four U.S. and international patents.

    Research Areas: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, gastrointestinal system, colitis, autoimmune diseases, pathogenesis, celiac disease, liver diseases
  • J. Marie Hardwick Laboratory

    Lab Website

    Our research is focused on understanding the basic mechanisms of programmed cell death in disease pathogenesis. Billions of cells die per day in the human body. Like cell division and differentiation, cell death is also critical for normal development and maintenance of healthy tissues. Apoptosis and other forms of cell death are required for trimming excess, expired and damaged cells. Therefore, many genetically programmed cell suicide pathways have evolved to promote long-term survival of species from yeast to humans. Defective cell death programs cause disease states. Insufficient cell death underlies human cancer and autoimmune disease, while excessive cell death underlies human neurological disorders and aging. Of particular interest to our group are the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 family proteins and other factors regulate programmed cell death, particularly in the nervous system, in cancer and in virus infections. Interestingly, cell death regulators also regulate many other cel...lular processes prior to a death stimulus, including neuronal activity, mitochondrial dynamics and energetics. We study these unknown mechanisms.

    We have reported that many insults can trigger cells to activate a cellular death pathway (Nature, 361:739-742, 1993), that several viruses encode proteins to block attempted cell suicide (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 94: 690-694, 1997), that cellular anti-death genes can alter the pathogenesis of virus infections (Nature Med. 5:832-835, 1999) and of genetic diseases (PNAS. 97:13312-7, 2000) reflective of many human disorders. We have shown that anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins can be converted into killer molecules (Science 278:1966-8, 1997), that Bcl-2 family proteins interact with regulators of caspases and regulators of cell cycle check point activation (Molecular Cell 6:31-40, 2000). In addition, Bcl-2 family proteins have normal physiological roles in regulating mitochondrial fission/fusion and mitochondrial energetics to facilitate neuronal activity in healthy brains.
    view more

    Research Areas: cell death
  • Jean Kim Lab

    The Jean Kim Laboratory performs translational research in the
    area of chronic rhinosinusitis, with a niche interest in the pathogenesis of hyperplastic nasal
    polyposis. Studies encompass clinical research to basic wet laboratory research in
    studying the underlying immune and autoimmune mediated mechanism of polyp growth and
    perpetuation of disease. Human cell and tissue culture models are used. Techniques in the
    laboratory include cell and tissue culture, real time PCR, immunoblot, ELISA, flow cytometry,
    immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, gene array analysis, and other molecular
    approaches including genetic knockdowns. Approaches used in Dr. Kim’s clinical study
    designs include prospective and retrospective analysis of patient outcomes and clinical
    biomarkers, as wells controlled clinical trials.

    Research Areas: nasal polyps, chronic rhinosinusitis, hyperplastic nasal polyposis
  • Joel Pomerantz Laboratory

    The Pomerantz Laboratory studies the molecular machinery used by cells to interpret extracellular signals and transduce them to the nucleus to affect changes in gene expression. The accurate response to extracellular signals results in a cell's decision to proliferate, differentiate or die, and it's critical for normal development and physiology. The dysregulation of this machinery underlies the unwarranted expansion or destruction of cell numbers that occurs in human diseases like cancer, autoimmunity, hyperinflammatory states and neurodegenerative disease.

    Current studies in the lab focus on signaling pathways that are important in innate immunity, adaptive immunity and cancer, with particular focus on pathways that regulate the activity of the pleiotropic transcription factor NF-kB.

    Research Areas: immunology, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, autoimmune, hyperinflammatory states, molecular biology
  1. 1
  2. 2
Create lab profile
Edit lab profile
back to top button