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Displaying 1 to 10 of 14 results for autoimmune diseases

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  • Erika Darrah Lab

    The Erika Darrah Lab is primarily interested in the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with a particular focus on the peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes. We’re focused on understanding the development of PAD4-activating autoantibodies over time and how they contribute to the development of erosive disease. Studies are underway to determine if the newly discovered antibody is mimicking a naturally occurring PAD4 binding partner and to identify potentially pro-inflammatory effects of citrullinated proteins on effector cells of the immune system.

    Research Areas: antibodies, autoimmune diseases, peptidylarginine deiminase enzymes, rheumatoid arthritis

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Erika Darrah, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Fan Pan Lab

    The Fan Pan Lab uses molecular, biochemical and mouse genetic approaches to explore the molecular mechanisms controlling the development, lineage stability and function of T cell subsets. The team currently focuses on regulatory and effector T cells, which are important for immune control or immune activation. Research in the lab will help scientists better understand the mechanisms behind immune regulation and will aid in the development of new immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

    Research Areas: cancer, immunotherapy, T cells

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Fan Pan, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Oncology

  • Felipe Andrade Laboratory

    Research in the laboratory of Felipe Andrade, M.D., Ph.D., focuses on the mechanisms of systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly as they relate to the role of cytotoxic granule proteases in autoimmunity and viral clearance, mechanisms of autoantigen citrullination and pathways that control immune effector functions in autoimmune diseases. We currently focus on two principal areas: (1) defining the mechanisms that generate citrullinated autoantigens in vivo in rheumatoid arthritis and (2) understanding the pathways that control the activity of the peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes in human neutrophils.

    Research Areas: autoantigens, autoimmune diseases, cytotoxic granule proteases, peptidylarginine deiminase enzymes, rheumatoid arthritis

    Principal Investigator

    Felipe Andrade, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Fredrick Wigley Lab

    The Frederick Wigley Lab is interested in the signs, symptoms and causes of scleroderma. We are testing new treatments for RaynaudÕs phenomenon and scleroderma. Understanding the treatment approach to Raynaud's phenomenon and associated ischemia and how to prevent digital ulcers is important for clinicians caring for these patients. Work in our lab has provided guidance in the management of Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischemic ulcers, including options for the practical pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions.

    Research Areas: Raynaud's phenomenon, rheumatology, scleroderma, autoimmune diseases, systemic sclerosis, ischemic ulcers

    Principal Investigator

    Fredrick Wigley, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • IBD and Autoimmune Liver Diseases Laboratory

    Investigators in the IBD and Autoimmune Liver Diseases Laboratory conduct basic and translational research in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and autoimmune liver diseases. One area of focus is discovering and developing biomarkers for diagnosing and prognosticating IBD and other autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). We also are exploring the molecular pathogenesis of—and developing novel therapies for—IBD. In addition, we are working to understand the molecular reason why many IBD patients fail to respond to mainstay drug therapies—and to develop diagnostic assays that can predict non-responders before starting them on those therapies. These biomarker studies have led to our application for four U.S. and international patents.

    Research Areas: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, gastrointestinal system, colitis, autoimmune diseases, pathogenesis, celiac disease, liver diseases

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Xu Li, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jun O. Liu Laboratory

    The Jun O. Liu Laboratory tests small molecules to see if they react in our bodies to find potential drugs to treat disease. We employ high-throughput screening to identify modulators of various cellular processes and pathways that have been implicated in human diseases from cancer to autoimmune diseases. Once biologically active inhibitors are identified, they will serve both as probes of the biological processes of interest and as leads for the development of new drugs for treating human diseases. Among the biological processes of interest are cancer cell growth and apoptosis, angiogenesis, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, eukaryotic transcription and translation.

    Research Areas: cancer, autoimmune, eukaryotic cells, drugs, cellular signaling, pharmacology, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, molecular biology, angiogenesis

  • Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab

    Work in the Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab explores the shared mechanisms present in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome and myositis. We use disease-specific autoantibodies to identify the factors that cause the autoimmune response in such diseases. Our current research involves identifying the antigen targets of autoimmune diseases, investigating the autoantigens targeted in cancers associated with rheumatic diseases and finding unique clinical biomarkers, such as the anti-HMGCR antibody specificity.

    Research Areas: autoantibodies, myositis, rheumatology, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Livia Casciola-Rosen, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Maureen Horton Lab

    The Maureen Horton Lab conducts research on pulmonary fibrosis through the use of both preclinical models and human trials. Our studies have helped to develop novel, genetic, tissue-specific models of immune dysfunction, which have aided in defining the immune regulation of fibrosis and in the development of treatment strategies. We have used T-cell skewing immunotherapy to prevent and reverse chemical-induced lung fibrosis and have conducted clinical trials for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which led to one of the first treatments that helped to improve quality of life in IPF patients.

    Research Areas: interstitial lung diseases, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary fibrosis, autoimmune diseases, occupational lung diseases, T cells

    Principal Investigator

    Maureen Horton, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Philip Seo Lab

    Research interests in the Philip Seo Lab include the assessment and treatment of ANCA-associated vasculitides, particularly Churg-Strauss syndrome, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis.

    Research Areas: microscopic polyangiitis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, autoimmune diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Philip Seo, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Schneck Lab

    Effective immune responses are critical for control of a variety of infectious disease including bacterial, viral and protozoan infections as well as in protection from development of tumors. Central to the development of an effective immune response is the T lymphocyte which, as part of the adaptive immune system, is central in achieving sterilization and long lasting immunity. While the normal immune responses is tightly regulated there are also notable defects leading to pathologic diseases. Inactivity of tumor antigen-specific T cells, either by suppression or passive ignorance allows tumors to grow and eventually actively suppress the immune response. Conversely, hyperactivation of antigen-specific T cells to self antigens is the underlying basis for many autoimmune diseases including: multiple sclerosis; arthritis; and diabetes. Secondary to their central role in a wide variety of physiologic and pathophysiologic responses my lab takes a broad-based approach to studying T cell re...sponses. view more

    Research Areas: t-cell responses, pathologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, pathology, immune system

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Pathology

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