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Displaying 1 to 3 of 3 results for autoantigens

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  • Antony Rosen Lab

    Research in the Antony Rosen Lab investigates the mechanisms shared by the autoimmune rheumatic diseases such as lupus, myositis, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and SjogrenÕs syndrome. We focus on the fate of autoantigens in target cells during various circumstances, such as viral infection, relevant immune effector pathways and exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Our recent research has sought to define the traits of autoantibodies that enable them to induce cellular or molecular dysfunction. We also work to better understand the mechanisms that form the striking connections between autoimmunity and cancer.

    Research Areas: myositis, lupus, rheumatology, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, autoimmune rheumatic diseases, rheumatoid arthritis

    Principal Investigator

    Antony Rosen, M.B.Ch.B., M.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Felipe Andrade Laboratory

    Research in the laboratory of Felipe Andrade, M.D., Ph.D., focuses on the mechanisms of systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly as they relate to the role of cytotoxic granule proteases in autoimmunity and viral clearance, mechanisms of autoantigen citrullination and pathways that control immune effector functions in autoimmune diseases. We currently focus on two principal areas: (1) defining the mechanisms that generate citrullinated autoantigens in vivo in rheumatoid arthritis and (2) understanding the pathways that control the activity of the peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes in human neutrophils.

    Research Areas: autoantigens, autoimmune diseases, cytotoxic granule proteases, peptidylarginine deiminase enzymes, rheumatoid arthritis

    Principal Investigator

    Felipe Andrade, M.D., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab

    Work in the Livia Casciola-Rosen Lab explores the shared mechanisms present in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome and myositis. We use disease-specific autoantibodies to identify the factors that cause the autoimmune response in such diseases. Our current research involves identifying the antigen targets of autoimmune diseases, investigating the autoantigens targeted in cancers associated with rheumatic diseases and finding unique clinical biomarkers, such as the anti-HMGCR antibody specificity.

    Research Areas: autoantibodies, myositis, rheumatology, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Livia Casciola-Rosen, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

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