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Displaying 1 to 7 of 7 results for angiogenesis

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  • Dmitri Artemov Lab

    The Artemov lab is within the Division of Cancer Imaging Research in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. The lab focuses on 1) Use of advanced dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI and activated dual-contrast MRI to perform image-guided combination therapy of triple negative breast cancer and to assess therapeutic response. 2) Development of noninvasive MR markers of cell viability based on a dual-contrast technique that enables simultaneous tracking and monitoring of viability of transplanted stems cells in vivo. 3) Development of Tc-99m and Ga-68 angiogenic SPECT/PET tracers to image expression of VEGF receptors that are involved in tumor angiogenesis and can be important therapeutic targets. 4) Development of the concept of “click therapy” that combines advantages of multi-component targeting, bio-orthogonal conjugation and image guidance and preclinical validation in breast and prostate cancer models.

    Research Areas: VEGF receptors image expression, SPECT/PET tracers, tracking stem cells in vivo, triple-negative breast cancer, image-guided combination therapy, MRI, noninvasive MR markers, cancer imaging

  • Elizabeth Wagner Lab

    The Elizabeth Wagner Lab conducts research on several topics within the field of pulmonary medicine. Our key areas of investigation include angiogenesis of the lung and its dependence upon systemic vascularization to regions without pulmonary perfusion as well as the role of bronchial circulation in the uptake of hydrophilic particles that are delivered to the airway surface. In addition, we are conducting several specific studies that examine the relationship between the bronchial vasculature and the influx of inflammatory cells to a patientÕs airways.

    Research Areas: lung ischemia, pulmonary medicine, vascular remodeling, vascular biology, angiogenesis

    Principal Investigator

    Elizabeth Wagner, Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jun O. Liu Laboratory

    The Jun O. Liu Laboratory tests small molecules to see if they react in our bodies to find potential drugs to treat disease. We employ high-throughput screening to identify modulators of various cellular processes and pathways that have been implicated in human diseases from cancer to autoimmune diseases. Once biologically active inhibitors are identified, they will serve both as probes of the biological processes of interest and as leads for the development of new drugs for treating human diseases. Among the biological processes of interest are cancer cell growth and apoptosis, angiogenesis, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, eukaryotic transcription and translation.

    Research Areas: cancer, autoimmune, eukaryotic cells, drugs, cellular signaling, pharmacology, calcium-dependent signaling pathways, molecular biology, angiogenesis

  • Kazuyo Yamaji-Kegan Lab

    Research in the Kazuyo Yamaji-Kegan Lab seeks to better understand the mechanisms, regulation and functional outcomes of a patient’s Th2 immune response during the development of pulmonary hypertension. Our team has demonstrated a direct connection between Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 and pulmonary vascular growth response; we’re now exploring the mechanisms of endothelial cell injury and subsequent Th2 immune response as it relates to cardiopulmonary diseases. In addition, we are researching pulmonary vascular angiogenesis, vasculogenesis and inflammation using in vivo physiology, in vitro cell biology, and genetic and biochemical methodology.

    Research Areas: pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary medicine, cardiopulmonary diseases, immune system

  • Ocular Vasculogenesis and Angiogenesis Lab (OVAL)

    The lab studies the development of blood vessels in the eye and how they change in diseases like retinopathy of prematurity, sickle cell and diabetic retinopathies, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The ultimate goal of the lab is to develop a new generation of therapies that, when delivered to the eye, allow the tissues of the eye to essentially treat themselves only when needed. The goal is to have the tissues generate their own therapeutics when needed, and stop production when the condition is resolved. These therapies will help reduce the need for repeated treatment and provide focused therapy, rather than treating the body with chemicals.

    Research Areas: vascular development, age-related mascular degeneration, sickle cell diseases, nanotechnology, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Gerard Lutty, Ph.D.

    Department

    Ophthalmology

  • Systems Biology Laboratory

    The Systems Biology Lab applies methods of multiscale modeling to problems of cancer and cardiovascular disease, and examines the systems biology of angiogenesis, breast cancer and peripheral artery disease (PAD).

    Using coordinated computational and experimental approaches, the lab studies the mechanisms of breast cancer tumor growth and metastasis to find ways to inhibit those processes.

    We use bioinformatics to discover novel agents that affect angiogenesis and perform in vitro and in vivo experiments to test these predictions. In addition we study protein networks that determine processes of angiogenesis, arteriogenesis and inflammation in PAD. The lab also investigates drug repurposing for potential applications as stimulators of therapeutic angiogenesis, examines signal transduction pathways and builds 3D models of angiogenesis.

    The lab has discovered over a hundred novel anti-angiogenic peptides, and has undertaken in vitro and in vivo studies testing their activity unde...r different conditions. We have investigated structure-activity relationship (SAR) doing point mutations and amino acid substitutions and constructed biomimetic peptides derived from their endogenous progenitors. They have demonstrated the efficacy of selected peptides in mouse models of breast, lung and brain cancers, and in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Research Areas: peripheral artery disease, breast cancer, systems biology, computational biology, cancer, cardiovascular, age-related macular degeneration, bioinformatics, angiogenesis, microcirculation

    Principal Investigator

    Aleksander Popel, Ph.D.

    Department

    Biomedical Engineering

  • The Pathak Lab

    The Pathak lab is within the Division of Cancer Imaging Research in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. We develop novel imaging methods, computational models and visualization tools to ‘make visible’ critical aspects of cancer, stroke and neurobiology. Our research broadly encompasses the following areas: Functional and Molecular Imaging; Clinical Biomarker Development; Image-based Systems Biology and Visualization and Computational Tools. We are dedicated to mentoring the next generation of imagers, biomedical engineers and visualizers. Additional information can be found at www.pathaklab.org or by emailing Dr. Pathak.

    Research Areas: microscopy, vasculature, tumors, systems biology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, 3D imaging, biomarkers, optical imaging, angiogenesis, cancer imaging

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