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Displaying 1 to 10 of 28 results for aging

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  • Adrian Dobs Lab

    Researchers in the Adrian Dobs Lab study topics that include gonadal dysfunction, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and the relationship between sex hormones and heart disease. We currently are investigating male gonadal function—with particular interest in new forms of male hormone replacement therapy—and hormonal changes related to aging.

    Research Areas: diabetes mellitus, hormones, hyperlipidemia, male gonadal function, cardiovascular diseases, endocrinology

    Principal Investigator

    Adrian Dobs, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Agrawal Lab

    The Agrawal Lab is focused on the medical and surgical treatment of otologic and neurotologic conditions. Research is focused on the vestibular system (the inner ear balance system), and how the function of the vestibular system changes with aging. Particular focus is given to study how age-related changes in vestibular function influence mobility disability and fall risk in older individuals.

    Research Areas: cognition, visuospatial ability, vertigo, aging, balance, vestibular system

  • Andrew Feinberg Laboratory

    The Feinberg Laboratory studies the epigenetic basis of normal development and disease, including cancer, aging and neuropsychiatric illness. Early work from our group involved the discovery of altered DNA methylation in cancer as well as common epigenetic (methylation and imprinting) variants in the population that may be responsible for a significant population-attributable risk of cancer.

    Over the last few years, we have pioneered the field of epigenomics (i.e., epigenetics at a genome-scale level), founding the first NIH-supported NIH epigenome center in the country and developing many novel tools for molecular and statistical analysis. Current research examines the mechanisms of epigenetic modification, the epigenetic basis of cancer, the invention of new molecular, statistical, and epidemiological tools for genome-scale epigenetics and the epigenetic basis of neuropsychiatric disease, including schizophrenia and autism.

    Research Areas: autism, cancer, epigenetics, schizophrenia, human development, aging, DNA, genomics, neuropsychiatric disease

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Andrew Feinberg, M.D., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Bakker Memory Lab

    Research in the Bakker Memory Laboratory is focused on understanding the mechanisms and brain networks underlying human cognition with a specific focus on the mechanisms underlying learning and memory and the changes in memory that occur with aging and disease. We use a variety of techniques including neuropsychological assessments, experimental behavioral assessments and particularly advanced neuroimaging methods to study these questions in young and older adults and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.

    Through our collaborations with investigators in both basic science and clinical departments, including the departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Psychological and Brain Sciences, Neurology and Public Health, our research also focuses on brain systems involved in spatial navigation and decision-making as well as cognitive impairment in neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, eating disorders, obsessiv...e-compulsive disorders, depression and anxiety. view more

    Research Areas: epilepsy, depression, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease

  • Center on Aging and Health

    The Center on Aging and Health pursues creative approaches to solve the important health and health care problems for an aging population. Research in our center involves population-based and clinical studies of the causes, correlates, and consequences of aging-related conditions, including frailty, disability, and social isolation. We house four distinct research working groups: the Frailty and Multisystem Dysregulation Working Group; the Family and Social Resources Working Group; the Cognitive and Sensory Functions Working Group; and the Biostatistics, Design and Analysis Working Group. We provide key infrastructure, such as the statistical data core, that supports clinical- and population-based research and education with expertise in research with older adults.

    Research Areas: cognition, disabilities, behavioral research, stroke, frailty, biostatistics, dementia, gerontology

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    David Roth, M.A., Ph.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Clemens Lab

    Research in the Clemens Lab focuses on identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate bone formation and repair. Currently, we are studying the role of sensory nerves in bone and the coupling of bone cell metabolic activity to the sensory nerves' development and function.

    The skeleton is one of the most important structures in our bodies. Bones allow us to stand, walk and move from one place to another, and they serve as protectors of our vital organs. With aging, our skeleton both loses its bone mineral and the structure (micro-architecture). The fine trabecular bone is organized into plates and rods, and these structures develop cracks and discontinuity. As we age, bone is lost and its structure compromised. This degradation of our bone structure — osteoporosis — is a global health problem. Thomas Clemens, M.D. is the director of the Clemens lab. He is the Lewis Cass Spencer professor of orthopaedic surgery and the vice chair for research in the Department of... Orthopaedic Surgery at Johns Hopkins. view more

    Research Areas: osteoporosis, orthopaedics, sensory nerves, osteopenia, bone disease, bone repair

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Thomas Clemens, Ph.D.

    Department

    Orthopaedic Surgery

  • Daniel Berkowitz Lab

    The primary focus of the Daniel Berkowitz Lab is understanding the role of nitroso-redox regulation and dysregulation in vascular biology and pathobiology, particularly as it relates to aging, atherosclerosis, and radiation-induced vascular endothelial function. Other focuses of the lab include understanding how basic cellular processes are altered in disease states, developing therapies for vascular diseases and helping lead space research team.

    As an integrated cardiovascular biology lab, The Berkowitz Lab has ongoing funding from the National Institute of Health, NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI).

    Dan Berkowitz, MD, is a professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine and biomedical engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Berkowitz serves as the director of the Cardiac Anesthesia Division at the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and director of the Integrated Vascular Biology Laboratory.

    Research Areas: vascular diseases

    Principal Investigator

    Dan Berkowitz, M.B.B.Ch., M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Daniel Nyhan Lab

    The Daniel Nyhan Lab studies vascular changes that accompany aging to determine the underlying causes and find ways to reverse the process. One goal of our research is to identify the factors that cause vascular stiffness. Our hope is that our work in vascular biology will lead to new ways to improve vascular compliance and thereby improve cardiovascular function and perioperative risk.

    Research Areas: hypertension, cardiovascular, vascular biology, vascular diseases

  • Healthy Brain Program

    The Brain Health Program is a multidisciplinary team of faculty from the departments of neurology, psychiatry, epidemiology, and radiology lead by Leah Rubin and Jennifer Coughlin. In the hope of revealing new directions for therapies, the group studies molecular biomarkers identified from tissue and brain imaging that are associated with memory problems related to HIV infection, aging, dementia, mental illness and traumatic brain injury. The team seeks to advance policies and practices to optimize brain health in vulnerable populations while destigmatizing these brain disorders.

    Current and future projects include research on: the roles of the stress response, glucocorticoids, and inflammation in conditions that affect memory and the related factors that make people protected or or vulnerable to memory decline; new mobile apps that use iPads to improve our detection of memory deficits; clinical trials looking at short-term effects of low dose hydrocortisone and randomized to 28 day...s of treatment; imaging brain injury and repair in NFL players to guide players and the game; and the role of inflammation in memory deterioration in healthy aging, patients with HIV, and other neurodegenerative conditions. view less

    Research Areas: HIV infection, mental illness, aging, traumatic brain injury, dementia

  • J. Marie Hardwick Laboratory

    Our research is focused on understanding the basic mechanisms of programmed cell death in disease pathogenesis. Billions of cells die per day in the human body. Like cell division and differentiation, cell death is also critical for normal development and maintenance of healthy tissues. Apoptosis and other forms of cell death are required for trimming excess, expired and damaged cells. Therefore, many genetically programmed cell suicide pathways have evolved to promote long-term survival of species from yeast to humans. Defective cell death programs cause disease states. Insufficient cell death underlies human cancer and autoimmune disease, while excessive cell death underlies human neurological disorders and aging. Of particular interest to our group are the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 family proteins and other factors regulate programmed cell death, particularly in the nervous system, in cancer and in virus infections. Interestingly, cell death regulators also regulate many other cel...lular processes prior to a death stimulus, including neuronal activity, mitochondrial dynamics and energetics. We study these unknown mechanisms.

    We have reported that many insults can trigger cells to activate a cellular death pathway (Nature, 361:739-742, 1993), that several viruses encode proteins to block attempted cell suicide (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 94: 690-694, 1997), that cellular anti-death genes can alter the pathogenesis of virus infections (Nature Med. 5:832-835, 1999) and of genetic diseases (PNAS. 97:13312-7, 2000) reflective of many human disorders. We have shown that anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins can be converted into killer molecules (Science 278:1966-8, 1997), that Bcl-2 family proteins interact with regulators of caspases and regulators of cell cycle check point activation (Molecular Cell 6:31-40, 2000). In addition, Bcl-2 family proteins have normal physiological roles in regulating mitochondrial fission/fusion and mitochondrial energetics to facilitate neuronal activity in healthy brains.
    view more

    Research Areas: cell death

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