Find a Research Lab

Enter a research interest, principal investigator or keyword

Displaying 1 to 3 of 3 results for Raynaud's phenomenon

Show: 10 · 20 · 50

  1. 1
  • Ami Shah Lab

    Researchers in the Ami Shah Lab study scleroderma and Raynaud’s phenomenon. We examine the relationship between cancer and scleroderma, with a focus on how and if cancer causes scleroderma to develop in some patients. We are currently conducting clinical research to study ways to detect cardiopulmonary complications in patients with scleroderma, biological and imaging markers of Raynaud’s phenomenon, and drugs that improve aspects of scleroderma.

    Research Areas: Raynaud's phenomenon, cancer, scleroderma, drugs, cardiovascular diseases

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Ami Shah, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Fredrick Wigley Lab

    The Frederick Wigley Lab is interested in the signs, symptoms and causes of scleroderma. We are testing new treatments for RaynaudÕs phenomenon and scleroderma. Understanding the treatment approach to Raynaud's phenomenon and associated ischemia and how to prevent digital ulcers is important for clinicians caring for these patients. Work in our lab has provided guidance in the management of Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischemic ulcers, including options for the practical pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions.

    Research Areas: Raynaud's phenomenon, rheumatology, scleroderma, autoimmune diseases, systemic sclerosis, ischemic ulcers

    Principal Investigator

    Fredrick Wigley, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Nicholas Flavahan Lab

    The Nicholas Flavahan Lab primarily researches the cellular interactions and subcellular signaling pathways that control normal vascular function and regulate the initiation of vascular disease. We use biochemical and molecular analyses of cellular mediators and cell signaling mechanisms in cultured vascular cells, while also conducting physiological assessments and fluorescent microscopic imaging of signaling systems in isolated blood vessels. A major component of our research involves aterioles, tiny blood vessles that are responsible for controlling the peripheral resistance of the cardiovascular system, which help determine organ blood flow.

    Research Areas: biochemistry, Raynaud's phenomenon, vascular biology, vasospasms

  1. 1