Preventive Cardiology

Preventive Cardiology

Genetics play a big role in your risk of developing heart disease, but so does your lifestyle. Johns Hopkins cardiologists are leaders in preventive cardiology research. With preventive cardiology, the goal is to reduce risk factors and prevent any signs of disease from getting worse.

Preventive cardiology researchers at the Ciccarone Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease work to better prevent heart disease and stroke through research, education and the highest level of clinical care for people at risk for developing cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease. They study topics such as hypertension (high blood pressure), cholesterol/lipids, diabetes, cigarette smoking, e-cigarettes, physical activity/exercise, diet, overweight and obesity, genetics, inflammation, aging, frailty, racial/ethnic disparities, gender differences, novel biomarkers, subclinical disease imaging, risk prediction, stress/depression, vitamin D and mobile health. The center publishes a robust database of original basic and clinical research findings by Johns Hopkins cardiologists.

A study through the GeneSTAR Research Center looks at heart disease and related risk factors in families where heart disease is prevalent. They research novel risk interventions, cerebrovascular disease risk and attendant metabolic and thrombosis phenotypic risk factors. The study has had a long-term interest in African-American families and disparities in the cardiovascular disease substrate.

Once a patient has been treated for heart disease, speeding recovery and preventing further disease is vital. The Johns Hopkins Corrie mobile health solution promotes skill-building for preventive measures such as diet, exercise and medication habits. The app connects patients with resources to help recovery, and uses mindfulness techniques to improve patient awareness and emotional strength. Patients track data analytics and biofeedback on steps, heart rate and blood pressure with smart tools including an Apple Watch and Bluetooth blood pressure monitor. Using emerging technology in this way, researchers are exploring new options for preventive care. 

Researchers