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Profiles

Profiles

King-Wai Yau on Night Vision That’s Not “on the Brain”

King-Wai Yau on Night Vision That’s Not “on the Brain”

King-Wai Yau, professor of neuroscience and ophthalmology, investigates sight and smell. He is currently studying how nocturnalnon-primate animals make their pupils constrict without using their brain. 
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Alena Savonenko on Investigating the Role of Aging in the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alena Savonenko on Investigating the Role of Aging in the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alena Savonenko is an associate professor of pathology and neurology. She investigates the neurobiological mechanisms of aging, learning and memory. Her current research studies the mechanism of aging and why it is fundamental in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.
 
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Liz Tucker on Improving Outcomes for Children with Tuberculosis Meningitis.

Liz Tucker on Improving Outcomes for Children with Tuberculosis Meningitis.

Liz Tucker is an assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine and specializes in pediatric critical care in the PICU. Her most current research studies neuroinflammation caused by central nervous system TB, which occurs most commonly in children.
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Ben Larman on a New Method to Measure Gene Expression in Patient Tissues

Ben Larman on a New Method to Measure Gene Expression in Patient Tissues

Ben Larman is an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology, in the Division of Immunology. He spoke with Fundamentals about a new technique for analyzing the RNA content of human tissues.

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Dung Le on the Hard Work Behind a Historic Drug Approval

Dung Le on the Hard Work Behind a Historic Drug Approval

Dung Le is an associate professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and member of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute. She co-led a clinical trial that was instrumental in the Food and Drug Administration’s recent approval of the drug pembrolizumab to treat cancers based on their genetic characteristics.
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Jody Tversky on a New Method to Analyze Skin Testing for Allergies

Jody Tversky on a New Method to Analyze Skin Testing for Allergies

Jody Tversky is an assistant professor and former Clinical Director of the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Here he discusses what scotch tape and drones have to do with allergy testing.

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Jiajia Zhang on her journey back to grad school.

Jiajia Zhang on her journey back to grad school.

Jiajia Zhang was a trained oncologist in China when she read news about former Vice President Joe Biden's visit to Johns Hopkins and the launch of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. She decided to focus the rest of her career on research, and she was accepted into a master of public health program in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. 

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Kathleen Cullen on the Electric Appeal of the Brain

Kathleen Cullen on the Electric Appeal of the Brain

Kathleen Cullen is a professor of biomedical engineering. Here, she talks about the synergy of neuroscience and engineering, and how both come into play in an often-overlooked sixth sense.
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Kathleen Gabrielson on the toxic effects of stress

Kathleen Gabrielson on the toxic effects of stress

Kathleen Gabrielson is an associate professor in the Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology. She investigates the side effects of medications, and the impact of stress on the body.

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Piotr Walczak on Visualizing Stem Cell Treatments

Piotr Walczak on Visualizing Stem Cell Treatments

Piotr Walczak is an associate professor of radiology and radiological science. He develops noninvasive imaging techniques to monitor stem cell therapies for neurological disorders, particularly those that affect the protective myelin sheath around nerves. 

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Albert Lau on the Mechanics of Biological Machines

Albert Lau on the Mechanics of Biological Machines

Albert Lau is an assistant professor of biophysics and biophysical chemistry. He studies the actions and interactions of molecules in atomic detail, focusing on signaling proteins in the brain.

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David Valle on the Johns Hopkins inHealth Initiative

David Valle on the Johns Hopkins inHealth Initiative

David Valle is director of the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine. He works to discover the genetic causes of disease and is part of the Johns Hopkins inHealth steering committee.

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Carol Greider on the Importance of Sharing Results ‘ASAP’

Carol Greider on the Importance of Sharing Results ‘ASAP’

Carol Greider, a self-proclaimed rogue scientist and ASAPbio activist, talks about the initiative to change scientific publishing to better promote the free flow of ideas.

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Jordan Green on LEGOS and Nanoparticles

Jordan Green on LEGOS and Nanoparticles

Jordan Green is an associate professor of biomedical engineering. He designs sophisticated molecules with specialized tasks, such as delivering therapeutics to help the body heal.

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Kristina Nielsen on How the Brain Turns Pixels into Objects

Kristina Nielsen on How the Brain Turns Pixels into Objects

Kristina Nielsen is an assistant professor of neuroscience with the Zanvyl Krieger/Mind Brain Institute. She studies how nerve cells are organized in the brain’s visual areas to enable object recognition. 

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Sergi Regot on Seeing Cells as Individuals

Sergi Regot on Seeing Cells as Individuals

Sergi Regot is an assistant professor of molecular biology and genetics. He designs ways to study protein activity in real time, in living cells, one at a time.

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Kelly Metcalf Pate on Being Both a Vet and a Biomedical Researcher

Kelly Metcalf Pate on Being Both a Vet and a Biomedical Researcher

Kelly Metcalf Pate is an assistant professor of molecular and comparative pathobiology who uses her veterinary training to study HIV with mice and monkeys.

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Mario Amzel on Protein Structure and Drug Design

Mario Amzel on Protein Structure and Drug Design

Mario Amzel directs the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry. He studies the physical characteristics of biological molecules.

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Adam Sylvester on Bones, Movement and Rock Climbing

Adam Sylvester on Bones, Movement and Rock Climbing

Adam Sylvester is an assistant professor at the Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution who strives to better understand how the shapes of bones and joints influence animal movement. 

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Taekjip Ha on Discovering Molecules’ Personalities

Taekjip Ha on Discovering Molecules’ Personalities

Taekjip “T.J.” Ha is a professor of biophysics and biophysical chemistry and of biomedical engineering. He brings the perspective of a physicist to the study of individual biological molecules, especially DNA and the enzymes that work on it.

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Patrick Cahan on the Algorithms Behind Tomorrow’s Stem Cell Therapies

Patrick Cahan on the Algorithms Behind Tomorrow’s Stem Cell Therapies

Patrick Cahan is an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and a member of the Institute for Cell Engineering. He devises ways to find out whether lab-grown stem cells have differentiated into the desired cell type.

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Ryuya Fukunaga on Small Silencing RNAs

Ryuya Fukunaga on Small Silencing RNAs

Ryuya Fukunaga is an assistant professor of biological chemistry. He studies small RNA molecules that help control which proteins get made and when.

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Rong Li on Cell Dynamics and Cellular Evolution

Rong Li on Cell Dynamics and Cellular Evolution

Rong Li is a professor of cell biology and of chemical and biomolecular engineering. She uses microscopy to see how cells work. 

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Kathleen Burns on Mobile DNA and Cancer

Kathleen Burns on Mobile DNA and Cancer

Kathleen Burns is an associate professor of pathology and oncology. She studies mobile sequences of DNA that account for most of the genome and seem to play a role in cancer. 

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