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Early Psychosis Intervention Clinic – Recovery After Initial Schizophrenia Episode (EPIC-RAISE)

EPIC-RAISE
Community Psychiatry Program
Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
5500 E. Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21224

Program and Services

EPIC-RAISE is a grant-based, time-limited program to assist individuals experiencing a first episode of psychosis. Similar to its sister program, EPIC, this team is focused on assisting young people and their families to get back on track and achieve their goals using evidence-based interventions. This team differs from the original EPIC program in that it is more intensive and time-limited. The multidisciplinary team model is based on Coordinated Specialty Care, which is the gold-standard for treatment of first episode psychosis and includes five separate specialties:

  • individual/family therapy
  • psychiatry/med management
  • recovery coaching/behavioral interventions
  • peer support
  • supported employment/education

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Our Patients

EPIC treats adolescents and young adults, ages 13 to 30, with diagnoses of:

  • Schizophrenia
  • Schizoaffective disorder
  • Schizophreniform disorder
  • Delusional disorder
  • Psychotic disorder unspecified
  • Have an IQ of 70 or greater
  • No history of Autism or Pervasive Developmental Disorder 
  • None or only mild substance abuse
  • No unmanaged major medical illness
  • Our patients are typically referred directly from hospitals but can also be referrals from current outpatient providers, self or family referred.

Recognizing the early signs of psychoses is important in order to get appropriate treatment as early as possible. Early symptoms of psychosis may include, but are not limited to:

  • odd or bizarre behavior
  • changes  in thinking  or speech  
  • decrease in personal hygiene  
  • social withdrawal 
  • preoccupation with a particular topic
  • marked changes in emotion
  • Other, more obvious symptoms may include suspiciousness or paranoia, auditory or visual hallucinations, delusions or odd, irrational beliefs.

Contact Us

For more information, or to make an appointment, contact Katy Rinehimer, LCPC, at 410-550-8241 or ksander5@jhmi.edu.

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