Skip Navigation

COVID-19 Update

We continue to monitor COVID-19 cases in our area and providers will notify you if there are scheduling changes. Please continue to call your providers with health concerns. We are providing in-person care and telemedicine appointments.

Learn about our expanded patient care options and visitor guidelines.

General Information | Self-Checker | Donate and Lend Support | Staff Appreciation | Get Email Alerts

Find a Doctor

Find a Researcher

Researchers

Sarah Berth, M.D., Ph.D.

Sarah Lynn Hatch Berth, M.D., Ph.D.

Photo of Dr. Sarah Berth, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Neurology
Female

Expertise

Motor Neuron Diseases, Neurology, Neuromuscular Medicine

Request an Appointment

Insurance Information

Maryland

410-614-4641

Outside of Maryland

410-464-6641
Request Appointment

International Patients

+1-410-502-7683
Request Appointment

Locations

Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center

Appointment Phone: 410-614-4641
601 N. Caroline St.
Baltimore, MD 21287 map
Phone: 410-614-4641

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

4940 Eastern Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21224 map
Phone: 410-550-0100 | Fax: 410-550-0539

Background

Sarah Berth, M.D., Ph.D., is a neurologist with expertise in neuromuscular disorders who sees patients in the Baltimore area. She specializes in neuromuscular medicine, motor neuron diseases and muscle diseases.

Dr. Berth earned her M.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois-Chicago. She then came to The Johns Hopkins Hospital for her neurology residency, where she also completed a fellowship in neuromuscular medicine. 

Dr. Berth’s research interests include understanding cellular mechanisms for degeneration in neuromuscular disease.  She is particularly interested in understanding how transport of organelles and autophagy (clearance of damaged proteins) is disrupted in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

...read more

Titles

  • Assistant Professor of Neurology

Departments / Divisions

Education

Degrees

  • MD PhD, University of Illinois College of Medicine (2015)

Residencies

  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine / Neurology (2019)

Fellowships

  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine / Neurology (2020)

Board Certifications

  • American Board of Psychiatry And Neurology / Neurology (2019)
  • Pending/Scheduled / Neuromuscular Medicine

Research & Publications

Selected Publications

View all on Pubmed

Berth, S.H., Mesnard-Hoaglin N., Wang, B., Kim, H., Song, Y., Sapar, M., Morfini, G., Brady, S.T. HIV Glycoprotein gp120 Impairs Fast Axonal Transport by Activating Tak1 Signaling Pathways ASN Neuro 2016: 8(6): pii: 1759091416679073

Berth, S., Morfini, G., Sarma T., Caicedo, H. Brady, S.T. Internalization and Axonal Transport of the HIV Glycoprotein gp120. ASN Neuro 2015; 7(1): pii: 1759091414568186

Knezevic, N., Candido, K., Cokic, I., Krbanjevic, A., Berth, S., Knezevic, I. Cytotoxic effects of commercially available methylprednisolone acetate with and without reduced preservatives on dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in rats. Pain Physician 2014; 17(5): E609-18.

Morfini GA, Bosco DA, Brown H, Gatto R, Kaminska A, Song Y, Molla L, Baker L, Marangoni MN, Berth S., Tavassoli E, Bagnato C, Tiwari A, Hayward LJ, Pigino GF, Watterson DM, Huang CF, Banker G, Brown RH Jr, Brady ST. Inhibition of fast axonal transport by pathogenic SOD1 involves activation of p38 MAP kinase. PLOS One 2013; 8(6): e65235.

Hennigan, R.F., Moon, C.A., Parysek, L.M., Monk, K.R., Morfini, G., Berth, S., Brady S., Ratner, N. The NF2 tumor suppressor regulates microtubule-based vesicle trafficking via a novel Rac, MLK and p38 SAPK pathway. Oncogene 2012; 32(9): 1135-43.

Patient Ratings & Comments

The Patient Rating score is an average of all responses to physician related questions on the national CG-CAHPS Medical Practice patient experience survey through Press Ganey. Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best score. Comments are also gathered from our CG-CAHPS Medical Practice Survey through Press Ganey and displayed in their entirety. Patients are de-identified for confidentiality and patient privacy.

  • ...Loading ratings...
  • ... 
  • ... 
  • ... 
  • ... 
  • ... 

Comments

Loading...
Is this you? Edit Profile
back to top button