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Martin B. Brodsky, M.A., Ph.D., Sc.M.

Photo of Dr. Martin B. Brodsky, M.A., Ph.D., Sc.M.

Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Expertise: Dysphagia, Laryngeal Dysplasia, Neurologic Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Swallowing Disorders

Research Interests: Larynx; Pharynx; Respiration; Dysphagia after oral intubation; Impact of critical care medicine on swallowing; Swallowing disorders (dysphagia); Swallowing; Dysphagia ...read more

Background

Dr. Martin B. Brodsky is an Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. His peer-reviewed research publications and book chapters focus on swallowing and swallowing disorders and he is a member of the Editorial Board for Dysphagia. 

Dr. Brodsky’s clinical research is funded by the National Institutes of Health; he studies the effects of critical illness and critical care medicine on swallowing and the airway and their long-term outcomes. His clinical practice specializes in adult swallowing and communication disorders.

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Titles

  • Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Education

Degrees

  • B.A., Michigan State University (Michigan) (1992)
  • M.A., Michigan State University (Michigan) (1995)
  • Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) (2006)
  • Sc.M., Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) (2013)

Additional Training

  • Trainee, Research associate; VA Health Care System of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 1998 - 2001
  • Trainee, Veterans Research Foundation of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 2001
  • Trainee, Medical University of South Carolina, Evelyn Trammell Institute for Voice and Swallowing, Charleston, SC, 2001 - 2006
  • Scholar, Johns Hopkins Clinical Research Scholars Program, 2011 - 2014

Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Brodsky’s research focus is the effects and long-term outcomes of critical care medicine on swallowing. He is conducting research related to swallowing disorders after oral intubation with mechanical ventilation.

View Dr. Brodsky's ORCiD profile.

Lab

Dr. Brodsky works closely with his colleagues throughout Johns Hopkins to investigate a variety of topics related to swallowing impairments after critical illness. His research areas include understanding swallowing impairments and laryngeal injury after oral endotracheal intubation, and understanding of swallowing physiology, formal assessment and bedside screening. Learn more about his research.

Clinical Trials

PReventing the EffectS of Intubation on DEglutition (PRESIDE) Safety/Efficacy Study

Selected Publications

View all on Pubmed

Brodsky MB, De I, Chilukuri K, Huang M, Palmer JB, Needham DM. Coordination of pharyngeal and laryngeal swallowing events during single liquid swallows after oral endotracheal intubation for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dysphagia. 2018. PubMed citation. Journal site.

Brodsky MB, Huang M, Shanholtz C, Mendez-Tellez PA, Palmer JB, Colantuoni E, Needham DM. Recovery of dysphagia symptoms after oral endotracheal intubation in ARDS Survivors: A 5-year longitudinal study. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2016. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201606-455OC. PubMed Citation. Journal Site.

Brodsky MB, Suiter DM, Gonzalez-Fernandez M, Michtalik HJ, Frymark TB, Venediktov R, Schooling T. Screening accuracy for aspiration using bedside water swallow tests: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Chest. 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.chest.2016.03.059. PubMed citation. Journal site.

Brodsky MB, Gonzalez-Fernandez M, Mendez-Tellez PA, Shanholtz C, Palmer JB, Needham DM. Factors associated with swallowing assessment after oral endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation for acute lung injury. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2014;11(10):1545-1552. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201406-274OC. PubMed citation. Journal site.

Brodsky MB, Gellar JE, Dinglas VD, Colantuoni E, Mendez-Tellez PA, Shanholtz C, Palmer JB, Needham DM. Duration of oral endotracheal intubation is associated with dysphagia symptoms in acute lung injury patients. J Crit Care. 2014;29(4):574-579. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2014.02.015. PubMed citation. Journal site.

Contact for Research Inquiries

Johns Hopkins Hospital
600 N. Wolfe St.
Phipps Building, Suite 181
Baltimore, MD 21287 map

Activities & Honors

Honors

  • Fellow, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2017
  • Clinical Research Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 2011 - 2014
  • Presidential Scholar, Medical University of South Carolina, 2003 - 2004
  • New Investigator Award, ASHA Special Interest Division 13: Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders in partnership with the Yul Brynner Head and Neck Cancer Foundation, Inc., 2003
  • Research Development Award, University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 2000

Memberships

  • American Psychological Association
  • American Speech-Language Hearing Association
  • Dysphagia Research Society
  • Maryland Speech-Language Hearing Association

Professional Activities

  • Member, Speech-Language Pathology Advisory Council, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
  • Editorial Board Member, Dysphagia Journal

Videos & Media

Recent News Articles and Media Coverage

Difficulty Swallowing After Being on a Breathing Machine Can Most Often be Improved | Health Newsfeed Podcast (April 2018)

Trouble Swallowing is Common Following Use of a Breathing Tube | Health Newsfeed Podcast (April 2018)

Ending the 24-Hour Wait Time for Post-Extubation Assessment | The Swallow Your Pride Podcast (December 2017)

My Critical Care Patient Can’t Swallow! Why? | Critical Care Practitioner Podcast (March 2017)

Bite, Chew, Swallow: How to Deal With Dysphagia When You Have MS | Everyday Health (February 2017)

Water Swallow Test Proves to be Most Sensitive for Dysphagia | Restore (Winter 2017) 

Reducing Dysphagia Risk Before Extubation | Restore (Summer 2014)

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