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Meaghan O'Malley Morris, M.D., Ph.D.

Headshot of Meaghan O'Malley Morris
  • Assistant Professor of Pathology
Female

Background

Dr. Meaghan Morris is an Assistant Professor in the Divisions of Bayview Surgical Pathology and Neuropathology. In addition to her clinical practice in pathology, she leads a basic research program focusing on understanding the molecular basis for Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related dementias, with the ultimate goal of identifying new therapeutic targets for Alzheimer’s disease treatment. These investigations combine insights from brain tissue donated by patients with age-related neurodegenerative diseases, studies in cell culture models, and cutting edge molecular techniques to uncover new pathways involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, her research is focused on how neuronal function and neuronal synapses are regulated by the microtubule-associated protein tau, a key pathologic protein which aggregates in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

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Titles

  • Assistant Professor of Pathology

Departments / Divisions

Education

Degrees

  • MD PhD; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (2016)

Residencies

  • Anatomic Pathology; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (2020)

Board Certifications

  • American Board of Pathology (Anatomic Pathology) (2020)
  • American Board of Pathology (Neuropathology) (2020)

Research & Publications

Lab

Lab Website: Morris Laboratory

Patient Ratings & Comments

The Patient Rating score is an average of all responses to physician related questions on the national CG-CAHPS Medical Practice patient experience survey through Press Ganey. Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best score. Comments are also gathered from our CG-CAHPS Medical Practice Survey through Press Ganey and displayed in their entirety. Patients are de-identified for confidentiality and patient privacy.

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